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The History of Troup Factory 



As taken from, 



"Brooks of Honey and Butter, 
Plantations and People of Meriwether County, Georgia" 



by 



William H. Davidson 



1971 



Pages 310-399 



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Robertson, Leslie & Company 

Troup Factory, Georgia 

"Very Safe, Prudent Firm" 

Cane Point was the nearest post office to the Indian and pioneer ford on Flat Shoals Creek Tmuo 

^ISZ^S:^^ FaCt< " y - J ° h * C - » ™ ** *« "-— « a„d T C^ 

1850 Wmiam E ' MaFCUS WaE named P° stmast ^ January 22, 1345 and William G. Marcus on March 11, 

ruarv f^U^fZ^tZ^A ^ ^Z* °^ 1 ( im ' m ^ was ™ned postmaster there Feb- 
ruary 27, 1850. The mills were downstream from Troup Factory on Flat Shoals Creek 

that date . P ° St ° fflCe W ^ discontinued Dec ^b^r 23, 1852 and its mail sent to O'Neal's Mills after 

^Jf^wf^^f nCy \ ° f , New Y0rk had re JP° rts for clients inquiring about the new cotton 
manufactory of Robertson, Leslie & Company built in 134647 on Flat Shoals Creek Thev showed 

££ ^it^ffiSSi Troup Factory was the name of the new water ^ Si^Sit^SS 

a T 1 ? 1 ??^ 1 ^ 1 * 6 T as a PP° inted Postmaster of the newly established Troup Factory oost office on 
April 5, 1847, From that time until 1902 there was a post office at the village of Troup P Factory 

J. ,M. (I. l40lti;HTH(JS. __ . *****.«... ♦ ■m-^tw— *«» 




n . T fj. j •.- '•'- T. L£«Ut 



MERCHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 




^cmj, <5ttfloii<fli^ ami firi^ ^J^ atitl ^faijd <f>h<m gams, 

EiSAW AKD UGttT Q5Ni*B.Ufl.GS, MATTRESSES, &<>„ £ Cl| 



A ^ 






tM f t tf 



Robertson, Leslie & Company, in which Thomas Leslie was a partner, was organized to build 
operate and manage Troup Factory. The members of the company, "men of character & property^ 

*saac t_. iceman Thomas Leslie Alexander M, Ragland 

The new company was first recorded in The Mercantile Agency's credit ledger "C Book July 1847 » 

^addTtrThev^ ^f T nS ° f $4 °'° 00 ' ° r mm - " With which the ^ esta ™ th * mandatory. 
In addition, they opened a store or commissary in connection with the factory for the trade of the 
operatives. J ^n UC m «i«r 

•also R G^ Dun & Company, New York, a predecessor of Dim & Bradstreet Inc New York 
formed of R, G. Dun & Company and the Bradstreet Company in 1933 ' ' 

[310] 



At this time, Maxey Brooks, proprietor of Brooks' Mill, and his family, were among the few who 
lived in the vicinity of the new Troup Factory, built practically alongside his mill. Brooks' Mill was 
a grist mill to which had been added wool carding machines, 

James Madison Creed Robertson and Thomas Leslie lived in Greenville, Meriwether County. The 
others were citizens living in Troup or Meriwether. 

Mercantile Agency said of the men in Robertson, Leslie & Company that they were ''not over 
prompt [in payment] but always good for their debts," 

Thomas Leslie was the manager of the business, "his credit and capacity good." For several years 
he had been in partnership with James M. C. Robertson. As Robertson & Leslie, they operated a 
mercantile store and hotel in Greenville. They were early settlers of the county, formed from Troup 
County in 1827. 

Mercantile Agency abbreviations, some listed below, have been spelled out in the quotations from 
their ledgers for ease of reading. 

bus business E/W estimated worth ppty property 

dg doing gd good w worth 

ef efficient G S general store 

Terse comments and remarks of the entries made in the ledgers are brief, concise and meaningful 

March 28, 1848 
Concern said to be worth 60 M S [$60,000.]. 

February 24, 1849 
Very safe, prudent firm, worth 40 or SO M $. 
June 9 f 1849 
"L" [Leslie] resides at a new factory owned by the firm & others & said to be very valuable. 
They [Leslie and Robertson] are men of good character, business habits and responsibility, 
each married, 30 <ff 35 years old, 

H< L" gave in for tax this year town lots in Greenville, Si, 400., 3 slaves & 480 acres of land- 
Firm [Robertson, Leslie & Company] reputed strong and solvent, prompt, not speculative, 
deemed safe, done business here 12 or 13 months. 
From July, 1849 to March, 1853 the entry on Robertson, Leslie & Company was "No change." 

March J, 1853 
We learn that "A. M. Ragland," one of the Co., has sold his interest to David E. Beeman who 
is married, aged about 40, steady business habits, worth about 50 © 60 M $, largely interested in 
line of [stage] coaches which we learn are profitable, firm good- 
The census of Meriwether County in 1850 listed David E. Beeman as age 40. His occupation was 
staging and he lived near Greenville on the La Grange Road. He was born in New Jersey. 
Value of real estate owned by Beeman was $13,157., and he had thirteen slaves. 
Six men, whose occupation was staging, were listed with him in the census. 
From July, 1853 to January, 1857, the entry was "No change, good, perhaps worth $100,000." 

February 5, 1858 
Good. Not sued. 

September 13, 1859 
The Co. now consists of the Estates of "David E. Beeman" & 'Thos, C. Evans," joint prop- 
erty 1 slave, $1,100.; Money & solvent debts $25,000.; Merchandise $5,000.; Capital invested in stock, 
manufactories, &c, $65,548. 

David E, Beeman was evidently deceased between February 5, 1858 and September 13, 1859. 
Thomas Crenshaw Evans was born in South Carolina on August 22, 1306. A colorful early settler 
of Troup County, he was a captain in the Indian War of 1836 and became a general of state militia. 
During the Indian removal from Georgia, he headed troops escorting them westward. Elected ordi- 
nary of Troup County, he served 1856-58. 

Mr. Evans married Rhoda B. Swanson of a pioneer Troup County family on December 16, 1330, 
She was bom October 15, 1813 and died March 4, 1862. He died May 5, 1858. They are buried at 
Hillview Cemetery, LaGrange. 

Other items of the entry for September 13, 1359 were: 

Robertson resides in Meriwether Co. Gives and pays tax there, don't know what amount, 
but learn credibly he is very wealthy. 

L's [Leslie's] individual property consists of 500 acres of land in Cherokee Co, f Georgia] 
SI ,000., 3 slaves $3,000., other property $800. 

B & E's [Beeman's and Evans 1 ] Estates will each be distributed- "B" left a large estate & 
"E" moderate, no suits or judgment Vs. them that we know of. 

[311] 







October 13, IS59 
The firm is good beyond doubt. They run Cotton Mills and keep goods of all sorts for the bene- 
fit of their operatives [in the store or comissary]. 

November 3, 1859 

[Firm] composed of Thos. Leslie, Estates of D, E. Beeman & Thos. C. Evans & many other 
wealthy men, in business 10 or 12 years. 

The Co. owns 1 slave worth £1,000. Money & solvent debts $25,200.; merchandise $5,000,; 
Capital invested in Stocks $65,543., whole property $96,848. Are doing a splendid business and 
good for any amount they wish. 

December 7, 1859 
No Change. Neither of the Estates withdrawn. 

July 1, 1860 
In business 12 years. Good for any amount they may want, 
Firm owns 1 slave, $1,100., name of Sam. 
[Money & solvent debts] 325,200.; Mdse. S 5,000.: Capital invested in stock $65,548. 

The entry of July 1, I860 ended the record of Robertson, Leslie & Company prior to the Civil 
War. 

Troup Factory engaged in manufacturing goods for the Confederate States of America. Some of 
its key operatives were deferred from military service to keep it running. 

A new grist mill for wheat and corn grinding was installed in 1861. Mention of this improve- 
ment in the property is made in a business letter of Thomas Leslie to James M. C. Robertson, Green- 
ville, dated at Troup Factory on April 4, 1861: 

Your last was rec'd, and cotton priced as per your instructions. The day you instructed to 
price, I bought 21 bales of A. [Abner] Glanton [pioneer of Troup County, whose plantation was 
between Troup Factory and the west boundary cf Meriwether County], all goo<i Middling at 1134* 
lb. Yours I thought to price at ll£. 

Since then h fine grades have gone as high as Htt£ to 11%£, and one lot at 120. 
I write now more particularly to say that our new [grist] mill is complete & ready for 
all work. At present we cannot get wheat for the obvious reason that there is none in the 
country & in the West it is too high to ship. 

Suppose you send a load down [from the Robertson plantation in Meriwether County], mixed 
of corn & wheat. We will put it through in a night. 

If you want Linseed Oil, I will order it from the West for you. The only difficulty now 
is in getting it along as soon as you need. 

Mr. Leslie closed his letter to Mr. Robertson by saying, "Beeman [Isaac C] not come yet." Mr. 
Beeman was handling the interests of the deceased David E. Beeman. They were probably brothers. 

After the Civil War 

The first entry on the ledger sheet of Robertson, Leslie & Company after the Civil War was 
dated February 27, 1866: 

Same parties still carry on business. They are doing a good business. 

"Beeman," one of the parties, is living in the City of New York & understand he pro- 
poses to remain there. Think the three partners [Robertson, Leslie and Beeman] are worth 

some 300 M $, 

"L !t [Leslie] manages the concern alone. The factory property is worth some 100 M $. 

December, 1866 
Under efficient management of Thomas Leslie. Worth 50 M $, Doing efficient and success- 
ful business. 

January 8, 1867 
Robertson, Greenville, Planter, worth about 20 M $. 
Thos. Leslie, Troup Factory, General Agent, worth about 150 M S, 

Isaac C. Beeman, who lives in one of the Northern States, owns R. R. [railroad] Stocks 
largely & is probably worth 60 M S. 

The factory is in pretty good working order, management prudent & usually punctual [in 
payment]. A good risk. 

October 26, 1867 
Wealthy. Consists of Thos. Leslie, Robertson and Isaac C. Beeman, worth collectively 100 M 
$. Deal punctual and successfully. 

July 21 f 186S 

This is a strong firm, worth 75 M $. 

July ll t 1870 

All right, 

[312] 



4, 0. TBHBELL, 
W. H. HUNTLEY, 






DlkLCTOIM: 
A. D. AGll.MiAJI, President, 






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ft. 7- BMITH, 










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BEeavj aadl ktgtot O'saafeftiffge, Mattresses, Etc* 



OHc's and WHMS-reoin*. LnGrnnge, Oa. 



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fl/fru^ lisZU^b 4W„ tfL&L^O */ 







TROUP FACTORY LETTERHEAD - From a letter written February 10, 1882 by John L. Robertson to his father 
fames M. C. Robertson. 




January 1, 1871 

All right. 

May 24, 1S71 

All right. Plenty of means &c. Wealthy and successful. 

January 29, IS 72 
All right in all respects. Good, moneyed men, H L" [Leslie] has plenty of means. 

July, 1S72 

Same. 
March, 1873 
Capital 75 to 100 M $. Making money. Very careful & correct Good for their obligations. 

June, 1873 
No change. 
December, 1S73 
No change. 
Robertson, Leslie & Company survived the Civil War and operated successfully thereafter. It is 
a credit to their business acumen that they ably managed the business through the Panic of 1873 
and subsequent depression years. 

"No change" was recorded for June, 1874 and December, 1874. The entry for June, 1875 was 
"No change. Strong firm" 

December, 1875 
Good for any amount. Means ample. They are regarded as wealthy, 
"No change" was entered in June and December, 1876; June and December, 1377 and June, 1878. 

December 187 S 
Careful and correct men. Good for obligations. Estimated worth 75 M to 100 M $. 

June, 1879 
No change. 
August 25, 1S79 
(In reply to special enquiry). Has this party ever been burnt out? Never. General repu- 
tation good. General worth & standing excellent. No reason to believe that he is seeking an 
excessive insurance. 

December, 1X79 
No change. 
M&rch, 1SS0 
Own and run the Troup Cotton Factory, also keep General Store. 
Successful men in good standing and credit. Regarded responsible for engagements. 

Estimated worth 75 to 100 M $. 

Author's Note: 

Quotations in this article from the early credit ledgers of Dun & Bradstreet Collection, Manu- 
script Division, Baker Library, Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration, 
Boston, Massachusetts, are used by permission of Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. New York granted 
June 13, 1969. 

As required, the manuscript was submitted to the Librarian of Baker Library and forward- 
ed to Dun & Bradstreet for review. 

The early credit ledgers in the Dun & Bradstreet Collection at Harvard are those of B. G. 
Dun & Company, also known as "The Mercantile Agency," a predecessor of Dun & Bradstreet 

Troup Factory 

Troup County, Georgia 

James Madison Creed Robertson and Thomas Leslie, early settlers of Meriwether County, Georgia, 
were the partners longest identified with Troup Factory. Leslie moved to Troup County and lived at 
Troup Factory village after the predecessor mill, Brooks' Mill, was bought by Robertson, Leslie & Com- 
pany in 1846 and their new cotton factory began operations in 1847. 

Brooks' Mill was a well established grist mill in which wool carding machinery was installed 
in 1&43, or earlier. Troup Factory, owned and operated by Robertson, Leslie & Company, was a pio- 
neer textile manufactory in Western Georgia. 

Maxey Brooks built the grist mill in 1829, the cotton factory building in 1846 and a dye house 
building in 1847. He was a pioneer Troup County settler, listed in the 1830 census as a male of 30 
and under 40 years of age and head of a family. He also appeared in the 1840 census of Troup County 
as head of a family. 



[314] 



An expert millwright, Maxey Brooks built another Brooks 1 Mill on Cane Creek, near Raleigh, in 
Meriwether County. Wool carding was also done at this mill* 

Brooks' Mill in Troup County was built in Land 
Lot No. 239, Third District, on Flat Shoals Creek. 
It derived power from water of a pond behind a 
dam oi virgin logs erected in 1329. The dam was 
several hundred yards upstream. For the new cot- 
ton factory and continuing grist mill operations 
a new dam was needed. The log dam was replaced 
by a rock dam built below it in 1846. A large por- 
tion of the rock dam built in 1883 is still in place 
on each side of the stream bed. 

About where the log dam was built, the shoals 
in Flat Shoals Creek were one of the few depend- 
able fording places on the creek handy to the 
Indians, traders and pioneers. The route was an 
offshoot of the main thoroughfare, the famous Oak- 
fuskee Indian Trail, crossing Meriwether and Troup 
counties westward, thence across the Chattahoochee 
River into East Alabama. 

Maxey Brooks owned lands of the Troup Factory 
property at his death in 1861, shown by the follow- 
ing extract of "Conveyances of Real Estate," Troup 
County records at La Grange, Georgia. All trans- 
actions are covered by warranty deeds and begin 
December 26, 1835 when William W. Carlisle and 
W. W. Graggs, grantors, sold all of fractional Land 
Lot No. 239, 87^ acres, in the Third District of 
Troup County to Maxey Brooks. This land lot was 
an original grant to Carlisle and Graggs by the 
State of Georgia in 1828. According to the indenture, 
it cost Maxey Brooks $432.00. 

Description of Property 
Land Lot 

239 
236 
15 
242 
234 
198 
238 
240 

Some of the Troup Factory lands were sold by Maxey Brooks, grantor, and by the administrator 
of his estate, his son, Thomas J, Brooks, grantor. These conveyances were: 

Maxey Brooks, Grantor 




MAXEY BROOKS (1791-1S6I) 

Built Brooks Mil!, a grist mitt and wool curding 

factory on Flat Skoals Creek, and Troup Factory 

for Robertson, Leslie 6 Co, t 1846-47. From an old 

sk&tch. Charles Warren Cwhtss Collection, Troup 

Factory. 



Grantor 


Acres 


Carlisle & Graggs 


87 M> 


Whatley, Taylor 


90 


Buck, Absalom 


48 


Oliver, James 


202% 


Cook, Thadcus 


202% 


Hall, Elija 


202 ft 


Bryant, Samuel 


87 Ms 


Watts, Reuben J. 


202V4 





Date 


Recorded 


Dist. 


Filed 


Book ^ Page 


3rd 


5- 4-183EJ 


E-303 


3rd 


5- 4-1836 


E-302 


4th 


7-17-1843 


H-438 


3rd 


7-17-1843 


H-43& 


3rd 


9- 2-1845 


J-98 


3rd 


9-11-1845 


J-102 


3rd 


3-27-184S 


K-1S 


3rd 


3-27-1848 


K-14 



Grant&e 














Greer, William 


33 




234 


3rd 


2- 1-1839 


G-224 


Gates, James H. 


20214 




198 


3rd 


6- 4-1844 


H-552 


Universal! st 














Church, Trustees 


2 




238 


3rd 


12- 8-1848 


K-122 


Truitt, James M. 


30 


G 


ranger Place 




1-20-1855 


L-306 



Lands sold by administrator's deeds were: 

Maxey Brooks, by Thomas J. Brooks, Admr. 
Grantee 

Hardy, Thomas 35 234 3rd 

Dallis, V. E, 140 Rough Edge District 

Brooks, S. B. 30 Rough Edge District 

[315] 



Grantor 



9- 4-1866 


M-760 


2- 5-1894 


1-577 


8- 5-1894 


1-576 














The ''Granger Place,' 1 was land sold by Maxey Brooks to James M, Truitt for $300.00 on July 
29, 1354, described in the deed as "all that tract or parcel of land lying and being on the north side 
of Troup Factory mill pond adjoining the lands of said Truitt on the north and the Factory lands 
on the west and the mill pond on the south, known heretofore as the Granger Place, supposed to 
contain thirty acres more or less, on the creek side to the highwater mark." Truitt owned Land 
Lot No. 271, adjoining Land Lot No. 240. 

Maxey Brooks was the son of Simon Brooks (1766-1859), and wife, Mrs. Phoebe Buffington Brooks 
(1769-1840), of Monroe County, Georgia. They were married in South Carolina in 1795, She was the 
daughter of Peter and Sarah Buffington. 

Simon Brooks was a millwright of acknowledged talent. He taught his sons, Maxey and Ivy, his 
profession. The two boys once ran away from home and convinced a man they could build him a 
mill. Swayed by their youth and eagerness to get started on their own careers as millwrights, the 
man agreed to hire them. 

They were not to be paid if the project was a failure! The boys were successful in the endeav- 
or and became partners, a relationship that lasted until they married. 

Maxey Brooks married Lucy Thornton in 1830. She was born September 11, 1812 and was the 
daughter of William Harrison and Diana Griggs Thornton, of Troup County, The couple lived near 
the Brooks' Mill. 

Mrs. Lucy Thornton Brooks died in Meriwether County on October 16, 1879. Maxey Brooks was 
born August 18, 1791 and died August 8, 1861, They are buried in the Brooks Family Cemetery at 
Raleigh, Meriwether County, near the site of their home and the ruins of Brooks' Mill on Cane 
Creek. The grave of Maxey Brooks is unmarked. 

Settlers coming into the newly opened counties of Troup and Meriwether brought sheep and a 
need for wool carding. Cleaning and carding of wool by hand was a tedious process. Maxey Brooks 
installed a wool carding machine at his mill. It stayed so busy that people welcomed the announce- 
ment that he was installing more wool carding machinery at Brooks' Mill in 1843. 

Associated with Maxey Brooks was his father-in-law, William Harrison Thornton and Robert Thorn- 
ton & Co. In the Columbus Enquirer for Wednesday. August 16, 1843 a notice appeared about the 
Brooks facilities: 

WOOL FACTORY 
Wool Carding — The subscribers respectfully inform the citizens of Troup County and the ad- 
joining counties, that they have two Wool Factories going on in the same house at Brooks' Mills, 
and that they are able at any time to dispatch business much better and faster than they have 
formerly been doing. 

They earnestly solicit all those who wish their wool carded to favor them with their custom. 

Maxey Brooks 
Harrison Thornton 
Robert Thornton & Co. 

Grist mills were usually equipped with stones to grind corn for meal and wheat for flour. Often a 
distillery was operated as a side line. There is a strong tradition that Maxey Brooks operated a dis- 
tillery at Brooks' Mill. 

Installation of water power driven machines for carding wool was another way to make a profit. 
Labor costs were not a factor of such importance that with capital a mill could not diversify to this ex- 
tent. 

Plantation owners brought or sent their clipped wool in bags to Brooks' Mill for carding. A toll 
was taken of the wool for the processing, just as a toll was taken by the miller from all grains 
brought to the mill to be ground. 

Products of a sideline distillery were sometimes sold or bartered for grains and wool. "Liquid 
refreshment" drew customers. 

As the practice of combination milling spread, and machinery for spinning yarns was added, as 
happened at Troup Factory, yarn dyeing became a natural outgrowth of the operations. Wool yarns 
and cotton yarns were dyed in a range of colors for an additional toll or price. 

The Brooks family accumulated a large number of woven woolen bedspreads or coverlets, some- 
times called "coverlids/' from tolls. Whenever one of the family married, the couple received use- 
ful and colorful coverlets as part of the wedding trousseau. 

Services such as provided at Brooks' Mill were of great convenience and benefit to the early 
settlers of Troup and Meriwether counties. Pioneers at first were hard pressed to make a living, 

[316] 



although the lands were fertile. Land had to be cleared of growth before a crop could be started. The 
task was easier for those who had slaves. Shelter had to be provided for families and slaves. 

Pioneers noted there were plenty of water power sites. Millwrights and millers were part of the 
migration. A few of the earliest settlers in Meriwether found it necessary to go to a mill on the 
Towaliga Creek in Monroe County, sixty miles away, for grinding a sack of corn! 

One ingenious Meriwether County pioneer, Abner Durham, devised a corn grinding mill of his 

own. The contraption was described in the Meriwether Vindicator for Friday, May 1, 1879: 

He fixed a long pole on a pivot On one end he fastened a maul under which he placed a 
mortar. The other end of the pole he fastened to a little water wheel placed in a branch near his 
house, so that when the water turned the wheel, that end of the pole would go up and down, and 
this would necessarily carry the end with the maul on it up and down likewise 

Abner Durham's mortar was probably a dug out portion of a poplar log. The heavy maul, shaped 
from white oak or hickory, was bulbous at one end, with rounded, rather long handle. 

Before going off to his fields in the morning, Abner Durham would fill the mortar with corn to a 
certain level. He engaged the connection between his water wheel and the pole. The maul pound- 
ed away until he returned! He made crude meal in this manner. It could be sifted and used in corn- 
bread, puddings and in other ways. 

"One day a hen flew up into the mortar to eat the corn," the Vindicator article concluded. "The 
maul came down upon her and that day the owner had bread and meat mixed." 

Awareness of an Industry 

Maxey Brooks, Robertson, Leslie and others associated with them could see that local handling 
of cotton should not cease with cotton picking, ginning, baling and shipping elsewhere to be made 
into yarn and goods. 

The cotton textile manufacturing industry scarcely had begun in Georgia. Near Augusta, Rich- 
mond Factory, established in 1834, had 40 looms and 15,000 spindles in 1849, according to White's 
Statistics of the State of Georgia, 

In 1348, Coweta Falls Manu- 
facturing Company was organized in 
Muscogee County, Georgia and its 
mill built on the Chattahoochee Riv- 
er, near Columbus. 

There may have been a few 
other pioneer factories. 

The mill projects for spinning 
and weaving cotton appealed to some 
as an investment venture for South- 
ern planters, merchants and capital- 
ists. Troup Factory was to take ad- 
vantage of cotton raised nearby, 
heretofore shipped for Eastern and 
English consumption. While section- 
al pride imbued them somewhat, 
chief interest lay in the Southern 
market Here was a demand, prac- 
tically unheeded before, for home- 
land produced textiles, particularly 
of the cheaper and more common 
types. 

Suitable water power sites were 
at a premium. The best were often 
occupied by earlier built grist mills, 
such as Brooks' Mill. Flat Shoals 
Creek was a splendid stream for the 
purpose. 






EARLY LOG DAM AT TROUP FACTORY 

The original dam at Troup Factory \Oai made of Jogt. Codete Col- 
lection, Southepn Views. 



[317] 




The principals in the firm of Robertson, Leslie & Company were Robertson, Leslie, Maxey Brooks. 
T. Molby, Alexander M. Ragland, David E. Beeman and Isaac C. Beeman. 

James Madison Creed Robertson was a planter and early settler of Greenville, Meriwether 
County. Thomas Leslie came to Meriwether from Wilkes County about 1835. He and Robertson were 
partners in Troup Factory and other ventures for about 40 years* 

Robertson, Leslie & Company. "Merchants and Manufacturers/' owned the cotton factory they 
named Troup Factory, George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia 1823-27, and Troup County, also named 
for the governor, were honored by the selection. 

David E. Beeman, born in New Jersey, lived next to the old James Swint place on the LaGrange 
Road, near Greenville. His place was on a well traveled stage coach route and he was interested fi- 
nancially in staging, his occupation. In 1850, his real estate was $13,157, He owned 13 slaves. 

Beeman was apparently unmarried. Six men, stage drivers, were listed, born in as many states! 
They were: J. D. Witham, 35, Maine; John Masden, 40, Kentucky; David Setton, 33, North Caro- 
lina; John Young, 37, Ohio; L. Barker, 27, Tennessee, and D. Gill, 27, Alabama, 

Maxey Brooks BuHds a Factory 

Maxey Brooks built the four story Troup Factory mill building, with the help of carpenters and 
slave labor, for Robertson, Leslie & Company. It was placed on foundations paralleling and about 
twenty feet from the Brooks' Mill, a two story building. Existing works for water power were enlarged. 

The framing of the new factory building was made of heart pine timbers, hand hewn, joints 
mortised, tenoned and pegged. When the framing of the structure was completed, Maxey Brooks put 
on a "stunt 3 ' for the people and workmen. 

He began a climb to the top of the towering frame on the bank of Flat Shoals Creek, He shouted 
for those below to watch. As he reached the top plate, he straddled it and sat for a moment. His 
boots and socks were tossed into the crowd. With the balance of a daredevil, he walked barefoot- 
ed all around the perimeter of the top plates! 




TROUP FACTORY — Middle building h original Brooks Mill for grist milling and wool carding. 
Utter, and at the time of the photograph, Troup Factory "Flouring Mill" Yarn dyeing and drnitig 
was done in foreground building. Cortetf, Collection, Southern Views. 

[316] 




ever saw.'* 



Troup Factory was a successful combination of water power grist milling and cotton spinning 
and weaving. Operations began in August, 1847. Its spinning room had 1,000 spindles. The factory 
employed 35 "hands" and consumed "upwards of 600 pounds of cotton per day," according to an an- 
nouncement in the Columbus Enquirer, for Tuesday morning, September 21, 1847. 

At Troup Factory, the announcement declared, "There will be in a few days an addition of 600 
spindles and 20 looms that will require a super-added force of 15 or 20 hands. The whole will be 
started at a cost of about $30,000." The article continued: 

Our informant mentions a fact highly complimentary to the mechanical skill of our State, 
namely that the concern has been started and put in successful operatic n by Southern men, no one 
but a Georgian having been employed to direct or superintend any of the works. 

The machinery is equal to any in the Southern country, the yarns, a sample of which we have 
before us, is of superior quality and spun from good cotton. Indeed, we are informed that no other 
kind of cotton will be used in the establishment. 

It is the opinion of the proprietors that when they get fairly to work they will consume at 
least 1,000 pounds of cotton per day. 

The same issue of the Enquirer mentions the ceremonies of laying the cornerstone of The Ho- 
ward Manufacturing Company, near Columbus, "at sunrise, the time of day for all such things to 
be done." 

Three miles above Columbus, the Columbus Factory and the Coweta Falls Factory were operating. 
"In the full tide of successful and profitable experiment, they are weekly turning out thousands of 
yards of cloth and thousands of pounds of yarn as good as the country can require, or the world 









They are, as are also the others noticed in this connection, in the hands of men of pecuniary 
ability, of great energy and enterprise, and rapidly growing to a condition at once to supply all 
demands, and bid defiance to all competition from a distance. 

These brave words, of course, were aimed at the New England manufacturing industry. Such 
factories as Troup Factory, a "thriving establishment," Richmond, Coweta, Howard and others were 
indeed bold "experiments" of the cotton raising antebellum era. Nevertheless, when proximity to the 
cotton fields and labor supply was proven, the cotton factories and mills grew rapidly and finally end- 
ed, more than 100 years later, New England domination of cotton manufacturing. 

Robertson Woolen Mill 

A few miles from Troup Factory, near the confluence of Flat Shoals, Turkey and Pole Cat Creeks, 
were O'Neal's Mills and Smith's Mill, These early Troup County grist mills were patronized by 
Troup and Meriwether County residents. The community was known as O'Neal's Mills and a woolen 
mill was built there in 1847. Pioneering this factory was another Robertson. 

Robert Robertson, born in Renfrewshire, Scotland, on January 20, 1810 immigrated to America and 
Georgia, He settled at O'Neal's Mills and bought from James O'Neal prior to 1847 a mill site on 
Flat Shoals Creek. The site was in Land Lot 73, Fourth District of Troup County, a short distance west 
of Smith's Mill, on Turkey Creek, Remains of the Smith's Mill can be seen on the Salem Road. 

The new, water powered woolen manufactory, known as the Robertson Woolen Mill, was in 
business for more than 22 years. Patrons brought their wool to the mill, as they had brought it to 
the Brooks' Mill earlier, for cleaning, scouring and carding. The patron called again for the product 
after it was put up in long rolls or in balls of a loosely twisted roving formed on spindles after card- 
ing. It was then ready to be spun into fine yarn on the spinning wheels by the women at home or 
by the plantation slaves, preparatory to weaving on the hand looms of the time. 

Robert Robertson's Family 

Robert Robertson's age in the 1850 census was 40. He gave his occupation as "manufacturer," 
and place of birth, Scotland. He had SI, 000. of real estate. His wife, Mrs, Elvinia Robertson, was 37, born 
in Georgia. Their children were: Mary, 10; Virginia, 8; Emelia, 6 and Elvira, 3. 

Listed in the Robertson household was J. Kimbrough, 29, a "spinner" by occupation, who tended 
and doffed the spindles of the woolen yarn making machinery. 

[319] 



ssm 





,-ja»: :t> £*- - 

TOMBS OF ROBERT KOBERTSOX AND FAMILY 

O'Neal Cemetery, Burke's Ch&pd Road, Troup County, Gs. The 

tombs are native stone boxes with marble slabs on which are the 

inscriptions. 

Mills and People 

"The accomplishments of Robert Robertson, James Madison Creed Robertson, Thomas Leslie and 
Maxey Brooks were wonders of the era. A pioneered new dimension was added to the economic life 

of a purely agricultural community. 

Mill owners here and elsewhere found that farm and hill people were adaptable to mill village 
living and easily taught to handle the machines. Many of this native labor supply were eager to 



Robert Robertson and his wife, 
Mrs, Elvinia Robertson, are buried 
in the O'Neal Family Cemetery on 
Burke's Chapel Eoad. He died in 
Cobb County, Georgia on February 
23, 1879. Robertsons were early set- 
tlers and prominent in Cobb County 
development, so it is likely that he 
returned there after the Civil War 
to be with kin. Mrs. Robertson was 
born February 29, 1314 and died Feb- 
ruary 3, 1390. Their daughter, M. 
Virginia Robertson, born May 11, 1843 
and died July 7, 1355 is buried by 
their side. 

Another daughter, Elvira, became 
the wife of William P, Roberts. She 
was bom May 25, 1843 and died May 
3, 1872, Mrs. Roberts is buried in the 
Robertson plot 



[320] 



quit the plow and work at the factories as "mill hands," glad for the opportunity to better their lot 
with a little hard money throughout the year. 

A job in the mill, subject to ups and downs of running time, beat the uncertainty of crops raised on 
credit extended by plantation and farm supply merchants. Oftentimes only the barest living was eked 
out under the credit arrangement. Sometimes the mill wages were inadequate, too. 

The mill hours were long, mostly from "dark to dark," children were employed, and wages small, 
comparatively, but the magnificent loyalty of the people extended through generations. 

Development of cotton mills in the antebellum period was significant socially. The industry, 
with very few exceptions, operated almost entirely with labor from the large pool of "poor whites 51 
and "piney woods" folks and did not become another slavery venture. Slaves are not known to have 
been used for manufacturing at Troup Factory and Robertson Woolen Mill Here and elsewhere it 
was felt that the slave was not suitable for the mill tasks. 

Abundant water power, cheap white labor and cotton directly from the fields and cotton gins 
contributed greatly to the rise of the cotton mills in the South. Cotton was of better grade, un- 
spoiled by long shipping time, such as in the journey by rail and ocean to New England and Liver- 
pool, damage from weather or other exposure. 

The Civil War interrupted an industry making much progress prior to I860, It resumed its 
growth in Reconstruction to flower in the decades before 1900 and later. 

Gregg's Paternalism 

In 1846, about the time Troup Factory was being built to operate as a cotton manufactory, the im- 
portant Graniteville Mill of William Gregg was constructed near Augusta, Georgia, The paternalistic 
policies of Gregg's management influenced others during the expansion of the Southern cotton mill 
industry. 

The mill village people grew accustomed to look to mill management for housing, property up- 
keep, schools, churches, physicians, civic guidance and social uplift. R was a system bringing untold 
benefits to generations in many communities of the Southeast. The management of Troup Factory 
was paternalistic in its attitude and practices. 

Demand for a Railroad 

Troup Factory and other cotton mills of the antebellum era turned out Osnaburgs, denims, woolens, 
other fabrics and yarns for a hungry market right in the South. The demand for quicker and better 
transportation arose, 

Robertson, Leslie & Company's management of Troup Factory was so successful a railroad was 
projected from the mill to LaGrange, Georgia. The railroad would connect there with the Atlanta & 
West Point Rail Road. 

The LaGrange & Troup Factory Rail Road was incorporated December 22, 1857 by James M. C. 
Robertson, Thomas Leslie, Jesse McClendon, Thomas J. Thornton, Thomas C. Evans, Orville A. Bull, 
nephew of Robertson, John W. McGehee and James M. Flowers, the latter a prosperous plantation 
owner of nearby Big Springs, whose handsome Greek Revival home still stands. See Vol. I, pages 6-9, 

Troup Factory's Agent 

William A. Redd & Company, of Columbus, Georgia was named agent for the sale of Troup Factory 
goods. An advertisement, or "card" announcing the fact appeared in the Columbus Enquirer for No- 
vember 23, 1847. The firm acted as selling agent for several of the cotton manufactories of the area, 
as well as agent for corn meal and wheat flour made at grist mills. It sold "sideline" production of 
grain products where grinding was continued along with the cotton carding, spinning and weaving 
at the water powered faetories. 

Building a Mill Village 

Robertson, Leslie & Company, owners of Troup Factory, made provision for the housing of their 
"mill hands' 1 before operations began. Slave labor was used to build the small cottages. The housing 
finally covered the hillside across the road from the mill proper, both mill and cottages being on 
the east side of Flat Shoals Creek. The site of the housing was probably a field, as old terraces of 
piled rock may still be seen around the hillside, A narrow road, or street wound around the rath- 
er steep side, from the main thoroughfare. 

There were some springs, but more water for the families had to be obtained for usage and 
convenience. The 1850 census of the Troup Factory settlement lists William H. Day, from New 

[321] 




Hampshire, and L. May berry, from North Carolina, as well diggers by profession. They probably 
worked in the mill also, with some members of their families, 

Troup Factory Census of 1850 

The 1350 Troup County census lists personnel of Troup Factory whose occupations indicate super- 
visory or other capacities in connection with the mill: 



Name 

Adams, Hinion 
Brewer, George 
Brooks, Maxey 
Brooks, Rodum M. 
Crosby, Edmund 
Crosby, James A, 
Griggs, Rodum 
Hill h James 
Holley, T\ J. 
Perry, Thomas A. 
Sellers, H. 
Sharp, Jesse 
Thornton, H. 



Occupation 
Overseer in Factory 
Carpenter 
Millwright 
Millwright 
Machinist 
Superintendent 
Cabinet Maker 
Miller 

Superintendent in Factory 
Mechanic 
Mechanic 
Blacksmith 



Born 
Ga. 



Fla, 
Ga. 



S. C. 

ft 

K. C. 
Ga. 



Millwright 

Maxey Brooks, builder of Brooks' Mill, predecessor mill of Troup Factory, still lived at Troup Fac- 
tory. His occupation was millwright and he had $12,000. of real estate. His age was given as 59 and the 
age of his wife, Lucy Thornton Brooks, 39. 

The children of Maxey and Lucy Thornton Brooks listed in the census were: Ernihne, 19; Rodum 
M., 17, a millwright; Robert H., 15, a farmer; James M., 14; Thomas S., 11; Louisa A. J., 9; Rebecca 
A,, 7; Lazarus B., 3 and ''Babe" aged one month. 

H. Thornton, millwright, probably was a brother of Mrs. Lucy Thornton Brooks. The Thornton 
family were near neighbors of Maxey Brooks. Thornton was 44, with S300.00 real estate, born in Georgia. 
Matilda Thornton, 40, his wife, was born in Georgia and their two sons, Franklin, 19 and John, 15 
were farmers. There were six other children. Also listed in the household were Edmund Crosby, 
machinist, and wife Amanda Crosbv. 

The following persons with occupation of "factory hand" were listed in the 1850 census of Troup 
Factory: 



Age 

22 
19 

50 
23 
16 

21 

in 



Bom 


Name 


Age 


Ga, 


Jones, James 


16 


7? 


Johnson, Auguston 


17 


K. Y, 


Smith, Green W. 


16 


Ga* 


Smith, James J. 


10 


H 


Smith, Lane 


22 


.-; 


Wei born, James 


18 



Bom 



Name 
Buckhamion, B. B, 
Culberson, James 
Da r rah, Willnim 
Hill, Aaron 
HiJI, Berry F. 
Hill, Elijah 
Hill, William 

There were probably other workers in the factory whose occupation is not given. Also, it is likely 
that women, girls and boys were working in the factory to some extent, a trend more marked in the 
I860 census, ten years later, when whole families are shown as "cotton operatives" and "factory op- 
eratives." 

Statistics and Honors 

White's Statistics of Georgia, 1849, gives the capitalization of Troup Factory as $42,000. and the own- 
ers as Robertson, Leslie & Co, The mill then had 1,600 spindles of spinning machinery and 65 op- 
eratives, "all whites." The production of Osnaburgs was 900 yards per day, with 100 bunches or hanks 
of yarn produced each day. 

An Agricultural Fair was held at Stone Mountain, Georgia, in August, 1848. The Southern Cultivator 
for September, 1848, stated: "Several Cotton Mills sent samples of cloth and yarn, all of which were 
excellent goods. No one doubts the success of this branch of home industry," 

In the October, 1848 issue of Southern Cultivator the winners of premiums and prizes were pub- 
lished. Under "Manufactures," the mills with notable "samples" are listed: 

To Troup Factory, for best Osnaburgs . Honor 

To Athens Factory, for best Thread and Ticking , Honor 

To Augusta Factory, for best Shirting .„„._ Honor 

To Princeton Factory, {or new specimens of 

Stripes and improvement in Dyes ___. Honor 



[3.22] 



White, in his Statistics, says that Troup Factory "took the first honor for Osnaburgs" at the Agri- 
cultural Fair and comments on the market for Troup Factory products: 

The goods are sold principally in the adjoining counties, and a considerable quantity sent to 
Philadelphia, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile and New Orleans. The orders for the goods amount 
to double the quantity made, 
William A. Redd & Company, the agents for Troup Factory, found Troup Factory a valuable ac- 
count. Goods sent to the port cities were for export through commission merchants there. 

The paternalistic attitude of Robertson, Leslie & Company is evident in another of White's com- 
ments: 

Great attention is paid to the character of the operatives, and none are received but those 
having testimonials of good and industrious habits. The company are about to erect a building 
for a church and Sunday school. 

No ardent spirits [strong distilled liquors, as whisky] are allowed on the premises, 
"Woolen goods will be made this year [1349]," White stated. He lists the industry of Troup 
County that year as "10 flour mills, 14 grist mills, 11 saw mills and 2 wool carding machines," It is 
evident that Troup Factory had installed wool carding equipment While White does not say where the 
second wool carding machine was located, it would have been at Robertson Woolen Mill. 

Products and Prices 

"Osnaburgs" originally meant a kind of coarse linen, made in Osnaburg, Germany but developed 
in the United States as a stout, coarse cotton fabric. It was useful for slave clothing and was manu- 
factured at Troup Factory for many years. The product was sometimes called "nigger cloth," as was 
"linsey-woolsey," a coarse cloth of cotton and wool mixed, used for clothing. Osnaburgs were made 
into work clothing, sacking, bagging and other general purpose articles. Troup Factory produced "bats" 
of cotton and cotton and wool mixed for quilts, as well as cotton batting for mattresses. Yarns 
were made in "bunches" or hanks. 

In the fall of 1346, new crop cotton sold on the Savannah and Columbus markets at 7*4 e to 8V^ 
lb. Principal sales were at 3£ for middling fair grade in square bales. The "square" packaging was 
preferred to the rope tied round bales of about 400 lbs. each of ginned cotton usually offered. Steel 
cotton ties and buckles for cotton bales did not come into use until the late 1350's, 

Cotton Osnaburgs, such as the product of Troup Factory, sold in Savannah and other Southern 
markets for 8 Vzc to 10 Vs? per yard. In March, 1852, the prices were in the range of 8? to 100 per 
yard, and cotton was selling, middling fair about 7%tf, fair to fully fair 8Ve£ to % l k<£, ordinary to 
good ordinary, SW to 1V^ and middling to good middling IVit to 7%c lb. 

Some of the cotton for Troup Factory was bought at the mill after it was ginned and hauled 
there by the plantation and farm producers. Much of it was bought in La Grange, a market town, 
cotton warehousing and railroad shipping point for Troup Factory products. 

The fortunes of Troup Factory and its people were tied to the cotton market. There were years 
of "peaks and valleys" in their prosperity. Such a tendency persists in the industry to this day! 

Prepared for Yankees 

During the Civil War, Troup Factory produced goods for the Confederacy and home consump- 
tion. After the Battle of West Point, Georgia, on April 16, 1&65 in which Fort Tyler fell, a week after 
General Lee had surrendered at Appomattox, the victorious Union cavalrymen of General Wilson 
headed towards LaGrange. Columbus had been captured by them on the same date and there occurred 
much burning of cotton and manufactories in that Chattahoochee River city. 

It was feared that some of the cavalrymen would visit Troup Factory on their way to rendezvous 
at Macon, Georgia. In their haste, however, they left LaGrange for Greenville in Meriwether County 
and the rather remote Troup Factory community was undisturbed. 

The people of Troup Factory were prepared for the Yankees, had they come. Goods, supplies, 
cotton and vital machinery were removed from the factory and hidden in the swamps of Flat Shoals 
Creek. 

During the Yankee raid at LaGrange, the express office was looted. A shipment of loom pickers 
made of rawhide was broken open and "scattered among the rabble and negroes," In the LaGrange 
Reporter for May 6, 1865, Thomas Leslie, Agent for Robertson, Leslie & Company, offered a reward 
of $100.00 for the return of the loom pickers. He stated they could be of no use to anyone but the factory. 

In the same issue, Robertson, Leslie & Company announced wool carding at Troup Factory. Owing 
to the uncertainty of the currency, they advised that they must fall back upon the old rule of "tolling" 

[323] 



the wool, unless they were paid in specie, or its equivalent in provisions. Their charge for carding was 
10* per pound, "and owners of the wool must furnish the oil or be charged extra." 

Mills Built After the Civil War 

In 1366, cotton factories were built at the sites of grist mills on the Chattahoochee River near 
West Point, Georgia, These were the Alabama & Georgia Manufacturing Company, at River View, 
Alabama, and the Chattahoochee Mill, Langdale, Alabama. 

Chattahoochee Mill was organized as West Point Manufacturing Company in 1880. It is now Lang- 
dale Mill. The Alabama & Georgia company finally became Riverdale Mill. The mills are now part 
of West Point-Fepperell, Inc. West Point Manufacturing Company merged with Pepperell Manufac- 
turing Company in 1965. 

Also in 1866, a cotton factory was built on the Wehadkee Creek near Roanoke, Alabama, called 
the Rock Mills Factory. T. J. Holley, who began as superintendent in the Troup Factory in 1850, 
or earlier, left the Troup Factory and became a principal stockholder in the Rock Mills Factory, 
now known as Wehadkee Yarn Mills. 

Troup Factory Osnaburgs rn 1868 

Frost, Hall & Company, whose large plantation supply house was located on the north side of 
the public square in LaGrange, sold Troup Factory products. An invoice dated November 17, 1868 
to the Allen Richardson plantation at White Sulphur Springs, Meriwether County, shows sale of 65 
yards of Osnaburgs for $14.60, or approximately 22Vfec per yard. 

New Management at Robertson Woolen Mill 

Troup Factory's neighbor, the Robertson Woolen Mill, survived the Civil War, but was under new 
management in 1869. There appeared in the LaGrange Reporter during January and February, 1869 
an advertisement or "card" of the new proprietor, John W. McGee: 

Wool Carding 
The subscriber would respectfully announce that the old and well-known Robertson Wool 
Factory, situated near O'Neal Mills, is now in operation under his proprietorship. 

Tolls will be taken in kind or in currency. Packages properly marked, left at Evans & Ragland, 
at LaGrange, will receive prompt attention. 

I have in charge of the factory, Mr. William Gilbert, a number one Wool Carder. 

How long Robertson Wool Factory continued in operation is not known. Older people recall talk 
about it and knew where it was on Flat Shoals Creek many years ago. The exact site is difficult to 
determine now, 

"Factory Boy's" Troup Factory in 1869 

It is to the everlasting credit of the newspapers of the area during the years of Civil War and 
Reconstruction that they published much to bolster the morale of the people, When manufacturing 
enterprises, such as a cotton factory , wagon, carriage and buggy factories, chair and furniture fac- 
tories, jug factories and other endeavors of an industrial nature came into operation, the editor or 
a reporter visited the places. 

A timely article usually followed, written in an objective, optimistic vein. Where there were local 
reporters in the communities of talent and the yearning to write, the editors enlisted such persons as 
news gatherers and published their periodical reports and news stories about the factories, farming 
and farming methods, cotton and cotton gins, crops, church news, school and social activities. 

At Troup Factory there was a reporter-writer who signed his articles "Factory Boy." Editorial 
comment on him appeared in the LaGrange Reporter for Friday, November 5, 1869. "Factory Boy" 
had written a long article about Troup Factory, entitled "Progress at Troup Factory/* appearing in 
that issue. The editor commented: 

Our readers will find a lively sketch of affairs at Troup Factory signed by 'Factory Boy,' 
who is what he represents, likely to be, and is now. at work in the factory. We say this to 
show what a determined young man can do. 

'Factory Boy' writes with a terseness as do many of our college productions and he shows de- 
cided ability. He ought to be placed in a position where his talents may become better devel- 
oped. No such a young man ought to be 'stripping cards.' 

"We hope to hear from 'Factory Boy* again," the editor concluded. "Let him take pains with 
his composition, give all his spare time to the cultivation of his mind, and he will reflect credit upon 
himself and his parents." 

[324] 



"Factory Boy" began his article by noting that "As progress is a great thing, and everybody 
likes to hear of it f and they like to hear and know the place where things are progressing, editors 
more especially, please turn your attention this way." 

Now, while you [LaGrange Reporter] are doing [articles] upon the things of progress in La- 
Grange, West Point and other places, do you think it anything amiss to take notice of the pros- 
pering events transpiring in our small and seemingly insignificant village? 

Or is it not only seeming ly, but really a place too insignificant for notice? I hope you will 
not think so after a little enlightenment on how things are going on here. 

"Factory Boy" then commented about "one of the chief centers of attraction . . . the Troup Factory 
Store, which is brimful of everything nice. They have got in (and are still receiving) one of the largest, 
nicest stock of goods that was ever imported into a country store." 

Earlier in 1869, in the issue of the Reporter for Friday, January 8, the editor had noted in his 
personal columns 'Tine Smoking Tobacco" from Troup Factory. He wrote; 

Our young and handsome friend, Mr. Anderson Leslie, of Troup Factory, sent us the other 
day samples of smoking tobacco, Lorillard's Yacht Club and Latakia, the latter cultivated and 
manufactured by Mr. Leslie himself at Troup Factory. 

The Latakia is well flavored and is a pure article of Cuba Tobacco raised in Troup County. 

Our friend will please accept our thanks, 
"Anderson Leslie is our clerk and bookkeeper still [at the store]. Everybody in the country, I 
guess, knows him. Therefore it need only be added that he does his business and he does it well," said 
"Factory Boy." 

There is one thing, too, very remarkable about the store, which is this. No oleaginous and 
glib-tongued clerks, for lying and description, are employed. LaGrange t please take notice — no 
hewing down with attempts at equivocation in the eagerness to sell. On the contrary, prices 
are standard and the truth is always told. 

The motto is 'Live and Let Live,' with 'Quick Sales and Small Profits, 1 If a customer comes 
in he is politely told the price of any article he may wish to inspect Then he can either 
buy or let it alone* 

"Factory Boy" thought about the effect of the store's prosperity and offerings on LaGrange trade. 

No doubt this big stock will materially curtail the flow of trade fi'om this section into the 
LaGrange Market. For who is going to wear out teams transporting produce to, and goods from 
there, over such hills, too, as there are between here and there, when they can get the same 
prices for their produce here and, on the other hand, get goods equally as cheap, and if any- 
thing, better, ten miles nearer home? 

The big stock is just what this section has been awaiting a long time, to save them the trouble 
of having to go to LaGrange. 

Reckoning on the uniformity of the sine of the place and population, our town, even now t 
surpasses LaGrange in trade and business. Farmers receive the same prices here for any produce 
which they may bring in to sell, as they are paid in LaGrange. The market here for all produc- 
tion is generally governed by that in LaGrange. 

In his issue of the LaGrange Reporter for December 10, 1869 the editor commented on the "Im- 
ported Guns at Troup Factory Store," and referred the readers to an advertisement in another 
column, "We warrant they are good, as no other kind would be allowed in that market." 

The advertisement featured a cut of a pistol and the following notice; 

We are just receiving two dozen imported shotguns, many of them very superior. Prices 
ranging from $10,00 to $50.00. Persons wanting something of extra quality can now be sup- 
plied. Cartridges, pouches, etc., to suit. — Robertson, Leslie & Co., Troup Factory, 

"Factory Boy" wrote about Troup Factory "turning off the very best goods of its kind that can 
be made. Any person using the goods now manufactured here and will say conscientiously that they are 
not the very best, can just take my pipe and tobacco for lying." 

In I860, the superintendent of Troup Factory was W. D. Fearce, age 30, from Virginia. He re- 
sided in the household of James Arp, a factory operative, also from Virginia. 

"Factory Boy" said in 1869 that "Here we have Mr. Hill for our superintendent, who is a live, 
honorable and energetic manager. Mr. Hill, though a native Rhode Islander, and a Yankee, is no 
radical. He, in consequence of his superior skill, ingenuity as a mechanic and machinist, is always 
alive to anything having a tendency toward the improvement of the machinery for making nice and 
durable goods/* 

Farmers need not lack for wool rolls, either, for here is the place to have them made as 
nice as can be. Any customers coming into our town are waited upon by the most accommo- 
dating gentlemen [at the Troup Factory, where wool was brought in for carding], 

[325] 











To show what enterprising and energetic men we have at the head of affairs here I will 
state that our Agent [Thomas Leslie], Bookkeeper [Anderson Leslie] and Superintendent [Mr 
riulj even are carrying on farms respectively to themselves. 

Now don't you see they are getting along well and making money fast? - and isn't making 
money essential to Progress? 

"To his part," the intrepid "Factory Boy 1 ' told, -Mr. Leslie made a whole bale of cotton this 
year, which bale only cost him about two hundred dollars or upwards! He at first concluded to 
store it, in hopes of the advancement of the price, so if it were possible, he might realize enough 
to defray the expenses incurred in the production of his crop. But I believe he has at last suc- 
cumbed and sold, realizing 23c lb. on the sale of it" 

If his bale of cotton weighed 500 lbs., Mr. Leslie received $115.00. "Factory Boy" wrote that "He 
did better than most of them will do for his crop, all around. He thinks so many have gone wild 
on the cotton mama - so many more men have turned farmer in the production of this staple (he 
being one of those misled) this year over that of last, that in consequence of the large increase this 
year and the over flooding of the market thereby, cotton will undoubtedly decline; and of course 
has somewhat saved himself by disposing of his in time, and he thinks it an example which others had 
better follow," 

Troup Factory had at this time "a large merchant grist milL" stated by "Factory Boy" to be "in 
full operation, wh iC h makes as good meal and nice flour as anybody need to want " Mr Garrett 
the miller, was a Confederate veteran and "a pleasing and obliging gentleman to his customers » 
How can he be otherwise, after taking the enormous swear, while in prison at Rock Island that 
if he ever got out alive he would strive to get employment in a grist mill or a bakery He wanted 
to get where he would be better bred than he was there! 

The physician at Troup Factory in 1869 was Dr. Andrew Edward Beasley. He was born March 
18, 1844. On July 9, 1867 he married Sarah "Sallie" Leslie, daughter of Thomas and Louisa V Leslie She 
was born May 19, 1845 and died March 27, 1928. Dr. Beasley died September 18 1381 
Of Dr. Beasley, "Factory Boy" said: 

Our little town is blessed with a nice and gentlemanly physician in the person of Dr Andrew 
Beasley, of whom it need only be said that for competency, good treatment and sound judgment he 
is a chip off the old block' [his father and others of the family were physicians of Troup County] 
Though there has been considerable sickness here this year, this i s generally considered a 
very healthy locality. Only two deaths — and one of those was an infant — have occurred 
here in about three years. 

Thomas A. Perry (1825-1890), was a foremost and industrious citizen of Troup Factory He operated 
a woodshop, blacksmith shop and sawmill. With his sons he operated a tanyard His establishments 
were on Perry Creek, near and on the west of Flat Shoals Creek. The Troup Factory Store of Rob 
ertson Leslie & Company, was also on the west side of Flat Shoals Creek, where its rock foundations 
may still be seen r 

"Factory Boy" admired Mr. Perry and said "He stands ready to welcome and accommodate 
his customers in the way of wood or iron work and sawing," but it was in another endeavor that Mr 
Perry caught his imagination and made his pen fly. He spoke of "the part which he acts and the 
position which he fills in our midst" 

We might as well try to write a graphic biography of General Grant [Ulysses S Grant! with- 
out overtomng his talented jockeyisms and the tenacity with which he swung to cows' tails in 
days of yore; to propel a steamboat without steam, or ship without sails, as to attempt a de 
scnption of happiness here [in Troup Factory] and not mention Mr. Perry's name 

This personage is an indispensable link of the chain of progress in our construction here 
He is the Justice of Peace of the district [Rough Edge District]. 

Perched upon the throne of his magistry, with codes of different kinds strewn promiscuously 
around, with his specs [spectacles] satisfactorily adjusted upon that olfactory protuberance for 
their reception, thus we find him occasionally, disposing of his cases of litigation and contentions 
with an eye single to justice and in a manner which the evidence demands 

Thus seated it may be said, with safety and without provocation, that he knows no man 
but law and justice, so far is he to anything which savors of the allurements of partiality 
Speaking generally of the Troup Factory people, "Factory Boy" wrote "For virtue and simplicity 
industrious and talented young men, beautiful and charming lasses, noble sires and exemplary dames' 
the society of Troup Factory, and vicinity, is unsurpassed and beyond emulation " 

u r°i ^T/^/^T 1 affection which is Paramount here, we have a Primitive and Missionary 
Baptist, Methods, Presbyterian, Universalian, Episcopalian and Roman Catholic Churches all in 
one. Any minister of the above denominations is at liberty to preach where all go and seem 

very well satisfied with the discourse. ^ m 

■ 

[326] 



Two acres of land were given by Maxey Brooks for a Troup Factory church, of his "own free 
will and accord for the purpose of prompting good morals in the community/' in a deed recorded 
December 3, 1849, The land was deeded to Walker Dunsom Thomas Hardy and Thomas Leslie, trustees, 
and their successors in office, for the purpose of building "a Universalist meeting house on," and was 
a fraction of Land Lot No. 238 in Third District, Troup County. 

"I also give and grant in aid of the above mentioned purpose," Maxey Brooks subscribed, "the priv- 
ilege of using the nearest spring on [Land Lot] No. 239, with this proviso; if the church should 
be discontinued, the aforesaid lot of land and the water privilege to revert to the donor, or to his heirs 
or representatives at law." 

The dimensions of the property were; "Beginning at a stake on the road leading from the Troup 
Factory to Hamilton, and running nearly north 125 yards, thence west 78 yards, thence south 125 
yards and thence east 78 yards, to the beginning corner, containing two acres, more or less." 

The church and schoolhouse building erected by Robertson, Leslie & Company for the use of 
the Troup Factory operatives and other citizens of the community, was used by all faiths. It was 
located at the top of the hill on the east side of Flat Shoals Creek, on the right of the present 
highway, and near the Troup Factory Cemetery now there. 

We also have a Masonic Lodge here, the members of which meet once a month, i am no 
Mason ['Factory Boy 1 stated] but judging from the rapid increase of the fraternity in the past two 
years, I conclude there musL be some good in that institution. 
"Factory Boy" noted that Troup Factory had no hotel "for the accommodation of travelers and 
visitors, but we expect to have one by the time the iron horse [locomotive] comes tearing, screech- 
ing and puffing through our little town on the [rail] road to be built from West Point to Thomaston 
or Barnesville [never built] ." 

For many years, Meriwether County had been famous for its springs, Warm Springs, White Sulphur 
Springs and Chalybeate Springs, developed as gathering places for plantation and Southern society in 
the summers, and as a respite for invalids seeking the medicinal qualities of the waters for health 
reasons. "Factory Boy" was not beyond visualizing something of the kind happening at Troup Fac- 
tory; 

Then, too, some lazy fellow having nothing else to do but stroll around, may, peradven- 
ture, along one of his perambulations, stumble upon a Chalybeate Spring somewhere in the 
suburbs which has not yet been discovered. We will then send for Mr. Kener to come and build 
a house round it with a cupola on top, as he is an adept from practice; up then will go the 
hotel, in will come the visitors and invalids with their big trunks and an untold number of 
servants. Houses will spring up, as it were, spontaneously, business will increase and indeed, what 
a thriving town we will have. 
"One thing we lack here and must have is a good bridge," wrote "Factory Boy." There were two 
bridges at Troup Factory, one over Perry Creek and the larger over Flat Shoals Creek. 

The one we have here is an old, dilapidated structure [covered, wooden bridge] which will 
soon go up if a freshet don't come along and carry it down. We understand that we are to have 
one soon, if the money can be spared. 

I'll wager a ginger cake against a bottle of sugar [water] that if it was a negro school 
house to be built the money would be forthcoming and the house put up forthwith. 
"Factory Boy's" long article was dated at Troup Factory, Ga,, October 26, 1869. He concluded 
with a descriptive and optimistic note: 

The sharp ring of the anvil, the grating sound of the saw, the melodious hum of ma- 
chinery, is the principal din of music here every day. 

Now who is there to say that progress is not on the move, with an upward tendency, at 
Troup Factory? 

Pitching a Hard Head 

An incident happened near Troup Factory about which a correspondent, "G, H.," wrote the editor 
of the LaGrmge Reporter on August 10, 1869. The "incredulous" but "positively true" story appear- 
ed in the issue of August 27, 1&69. "G, H," opined that if the "hero** had been one of the Grant [Presi- 
dent Ulysses S. Grant] family, or some "illustrious prince," the news would have reached "almost 
the entire world ... in a very short space of time, but as it was only a pupil of Mr. Hogg's school 
no notice has been taken of it whatever." 

A young man was riding a very skittish horse with great celerity up the road which passes 
by the school room and as the horse reached the place where he was usually accustomed to 
turn in toward the school house he made a sudden and very quick turn, unhorsing his Tider 
and pitching him head-foremost, and with a great force against a large oak tree which was 

[327] 




sta riding near the road. The poor tree barked when our hero's head struck against it and then gave 
up the ghost. 

This is a certain fact, for the tree from the moment ceased to live. It is there now though 
only a decaying trunk with leafless branches. 

I don't think any person could kill a full grown oak at a single butt, at least there are not 
many, I presume, who are willing to try it. Our hero, I guess would be loath to try it the 
second time. He was very badly hurt but he now has entirely recovered and no doubt could 
make a right good butt again. 

It did not kill htm, but he killed the tree, as anyone passing the Pleasant Grove Church 
can see for themselves. 

Ads and Appeals to the Ladies 

Troup Factory ads were inserted in the newspapers of the area from time to time. The factory- 
was diversified in that it had carding, spinning, weaving and dyeing departments for processing of 
cotton and wool fibers, and operated a grist mill for corn and wheat products. Usually the adver- 
tisements called attention to some facet of the plant, seasonally appealing, or when it needed busi- 
ness. They were mostly in a personal, conversational vein. 

The grist milling department, in an advertisement appearing in the LaCrange Reporter for Janu- 
ary 29, 1870 pointed out to their patrons, "especially farmers/' the necessity for better protection to 
their grains when sent to the mill. It was customary then for a farmer, his son or hired hand, to 
load a wagon or balance a couple of sacks of grain on a horse and head to the mill when the meal 
or flour supply ran low at home. 

The "Old Miller," who signed the advertisement, stated that "Very few have a cover on wagons, 
or carts, or a blanket or oilcloth to protect a bag on horseback." He advised that such protection 
"would cost but a trifle and both the old grain and the flour would be kept dry and clean. It is hor- 
rid to receive grain and return proceeds in wet, dirty sacks." 

Although it was "respectfully submitted," the "Old Miller" got another pet "peeve" off his chest: 
Don't send your grain in old guano sacks that have simply been rinsed a few times in cold 
water. They ought to be boiled daily for six months and saturated in cologne sis more before 
flour is put in them. 

Many of the commercial fertilizers of the era were frankly experimental in nature and even 
"gyps." Some were sacked bird droppings from islands off South America! The "Old Miller" knew 
his subject when he told his patrons "Don't use them at all." 

He also advised against the use of the loosely woven "old corn sacks, unfit for bags. They are 
too thin and leave a hairy fibre in the flour." 

He put his case before the ladies: 

I beg respectfully of the ladies, who ought to see to the washing department, to have the 
meal and flour bags well washed occasionally. Bags may be seen at mills that would make the 
mistress blush if asked whose they were. 

The old doggerel ran thus, it was declared: 

There's nothing in the world so shocking 
As a pretty kiss with a hole in her stocking! 

I deny it! A dirty mealbag with a dozen holes in it is worse. Don't get mad with me, ladies. 
All millers are telling the same story. 

Ads in Textile Directories 

In old directories of the cotton textile Industry there are references to Troup Factory and Rob- 
ertson, Leslie & Company. They are listed in the famous Dockham's Textile Directory for 1868-69, but 
without detail. 

The United States Textile Directory for 1S75 lists Troup Factory with Thomas Leslie, Agent, and 
N. S. Leslie, Selling Agent for Robertson, Leslie & Company. The mill was then producing 6 oz. 
and 8 oz. Osnaburgs, 6 oz. Checks and Stripes and Cotton Yarns, 5's to 12's. 

Capital was shown as 5100,000. The equipment was 50 narrow looms, 20 cards, 2,000 spindles. 

Dockhams Textile Directory for 1S76-77, names the goods as Osnaburgs, Checks, Denims, Yarns, 
etc., and gives the number of spindles as 2,200, 

Information from these directories, and others mentioned, is from directories in the collections 
of Merrimack Valley Textile Museum, North Andover, Massachusetts. 

[328] 



[329] 



Ellis' Store 

Troup Factory products were sold in the store of David Ellis, Greenville, Meriwether County. 
In the Meriwether Vindicator for September 5, 1873 he notified his patrons he had "Just received a 
large lot of Troup Factory cotton plaids, checks, white and colored yarns." In 1876, Troup Factory 
"checks" sold for 15£ yd. and their "stripes" sold for 14* yd,, at the Ellis store. "Checks" of the 
Eagle & Phenix mill at Columbus, Georgia, were offered at 12 ^ yd. 

Troup Factory Store 

An advertisement of the Troup Factory Store appeared in the Meriwether Vindicator for June 
16, 1876. The editor mentioned that "Robertson, Leslie & Co., of Troup Factory, have a card in our 
advertising columns this week to which we call special attention. The well known character of these 
gentlemen is a guarantee that every statement in their card is true to the letter. Give them a lib- 
eral patronage," 

The "card" began with an announcement in large letters: lt New Advertisement — Troup Factory 
Store! More New Goods We Have Now and Are Constantly Receiving Them. Prices Lower and Lower, 
Every Day!" 

We are old dealers and know that Dry Goods are lower now than when cotton was five 
cents. 

We are selling at Rock Bottom Prices and sticking 'closer than a brother' to cash and barter 
trade. 

Next week, and after, we want to Barter For Wheat, We want it by the bag, by the cart 
and by the wagon load. Let the neighbors come) Let all of Meriwether [County] come! Let all 
that are afar off come and bring wheat and uats and anything good for man or beast to eat 
and barter for cheap goods. 

We keep the biggest and best assorted stock of goods in Troup County. 
At Troup Factory, "Besides all these things," the message of the advertisement continued, "we are 
manufacturing the best Osnaburgs, Cotton Yarn, White and Colored [dyed], and the very best Plaids, 
Stripes, Checks and Denims made in Georgia, for men and boys and laboring women. This is a truth 
that our customers already know, a truth that will stand when the 'World is on Fire.' " 

We think it no egotism to say we deal squarely with all mankind. Give honest weight and 
measure and try to keep a clear conscience. 

Orders carefully filled. Will take remnants of good cotton at all times. No dog-tail want- 
ed at any price. 

Industrial Census of Troup Factory 

Tfie Georgia Industrial Census, 1876-77, describes Troup Factory as "a post village" of Troup Coun- 
ty, located "10 miles southeast of county seat, 10 miles from LaGrange." The Troup Factory then em- 
ployed "100 operatives in the manufacture of Osna burgs, checks, yarns, etc, Population 250." The fol- 
lowing is quoted; 

Beasley, A. E-, physician Perry, John T., general store 

Churches, Mt. Zion Baptist Perry, James O., general store 

Dal lis, A. T., postmaster Priddy, R. T\, physician 

Hardy, L r L rj grist mill Perry, Thos. A., saw mill 

Hardy T L, L., Sen., general store Robertson, Leslie & Co., cotton manufacturers 

Herndon, B. NT., boots and shoes and general store. 

Horn, John, boots and shoes Troup Factory Grist Mill 

Thompson, John s justice of peace 

Bartered for Wheat 

Troup Factory used the barter system oftentimes to obtain wheat. In the LaGrange Reporter for 
June 28, 1877 Thomas Leslie, Agent, advertised the Troup Factory Flouring Mills: 

Our mills are now in fine order. Lately bought a new bolting cloth, nice and fine. Sun [dry 
in the sunshine] your wheat before sending. Damp and smutty wheat never does well. 
Send [your wheat] in nice clean bags, no guano or corn sacks. 
At the same time, under a heading, "Wheat Wanted," Agent Leslie stated "We want to barter for 
1,000 bushels of wheat. Would pay a little Cash on a Hard Press. Don't want smutty wheat" 

Troup Factory News 

The La Grange Reporter occasionally published a column of "Troup Factory News." In Its issue 
of July 26, 1877 Troup Factory's "Fourth of July Celebration" was called a "huge thing! How much talk 













it furnished! Those people present enjoyed the day and would not have been denied its privileges 
for any small amount" 

Another item stated "The neighborhood is enjoying the prospect of more bread — we cannot under- 
write the word plenty — since the last rains have fallen." 

At the Troup Factory Church, John Lemuel Robertson (1849-1903), son of James Madison Creed 
Robertson, and John T, Perry, son of Thomas A, and Permelia J. Perry, conducted "Sunday School, a 
very interesting feature in the community. The singing is fine and the attendance is always good." 

Confederate Veterans' Encampment 

The Confederate Veterans of West Point and La Grange, the 'West Point Guards" and the "La- 
Grange Light Guards," encamped in the summer of 1877 at White Sulphur Springs, Meriwether 
County, for several days. Robertson, Leslie & Company donated to each company of veterans "a 
couple of tents," 

Marbles "For All" 

Many Troup Factory people enjoyed the games of marbles played by the young and the not-so- 
young: 

Marbles! Marbles! What would Troup Factory do without marbles? To see the relish and 
hilarious fuss with which the game is played by the little fellows, to-wit: Leslie Dallis, Andy 
Beasley, Ab Dallis, Bobbie Traylor, alias Robert B,, Sr., alias 'Col.,' and Doc Roberts and oth- 
ers, is itself an antidote to ennui. 

But the conceded champion is Bobbie Tray lor, and on any account he is the Prince of Marble 
Players, 

Obviously the game was enjoyed by some of the "older boys" in the Troup Factory community, 
either as participants or kibitzers: Leslie Wellington Dallis (1843-1903), Dr. Andrew Edward Beasley 
(1844-1831), Abner Thomas Dallis (1849-1921), Robert B. Tray lor, Sr. (1816-1893) and "Doc Roberts" 
were prominent Troup County citizens. 

The correspondent at Troup Factory who sent the "Troup Factory News" to the LaGrwge Reporter 
had other remarks about marbles the next week: 

Ringer Wanted. The youthful marble-ists aforementioned desire to engage the services of a 
permanent ringer. Anyone wishing a situation would better apply. 

Perry MiJIrace 

Thomas A. Perry and his son, James O. Perry, began a notable construction and engineering 
project at Troup Factory in 1877. They built a millrace about 1,500 yards long on the west side of Flat 
Shoals Creek to bring water from the creek to drive the saws of their public cotton ginnery, The 
water was also used in their tanyard operations. 

The Troup Factory correspondent, "Rough Edge," wrote the editor of the Reporter about the Perry 
millrace. His account appeared in the issue of November 1, 1877. With eloquence he said, "The race 
where it crosses the bed of their stream [Perry Creek] is about twenty feet high and looks like the 
ghost of the North & South Rail Road, 'the loved and lost Lenore.' " 

As the millrace crossed the Perry Creek, it was an elevated structure or viaduct for carrying the 
water and reminded "Rough Edge" of a railroad trestle. He spoke of the "ghost" of the North & South 
Rail Road, which was building from Columbus, Georgia to Rome, Georgia. The Columbus Enquirer for 
July 18, 1878 carried a notice about progress on the road: 

The road has been graded and prepared for the laying of ties and rails to Hamilton [Harris 
County], Forty hands are employed and they are working rapidly. The iron, account of some 
accident at the Chattanooga Mills, has been delayed, but will be here in seven or eight days. Tmn 
[rail] has been laid the distance of one quarter mile from Kingsboro. 

This was the second fond dream that one day a railroad would reach Troup Factory, but it was 
not to be, thus the "loved and lost Lenore," 

Bringing the water around the hills of the Troup Factory terrain, in a millrace partly a clay lined 
ditch, partly rock walled and partly a trough of timbers, was a feat about which "Rough Edge" ad- 
miringly said; 

These gentlemen [the Perrys] have employed considerable energy and enterprise, having sur- 
mounted many natural obstructions in the stern beds of granite that slumber in these native 
hills. 

Their work is not yet complete, but enough to mingle the music of its wheels with the busy 
hum of the cotton factory close by; and to the ear of the passerby the stir and whirl of machin- 
ery is both pleasing and animating. 

[330] 



Troup Factory After 31 Years 

By 1878, James Madison Creed Robertson and Thomas Leslie had been partners, proprietors and 
owners of Troup Factory since 1847, or 31 years. Mr. Robertson was born in 1809 and Mr. Leslie in 
1812. In 1878, "owing to the advanced age and failing health of the proprietors and owners of the 
Troup Factory," the partners decided to "sell out and retire from the business" 

In their signed advertisement, "Troup Factory for Sale," dated June 5, 1378 at Troup Factory, 
Georgia, which appeared in issues of the newspapers of LaGrange, Columbus and possibly other towns 
of the area, the partners gave about as complete a description of Troup Factory as has been found. 




TROUP FACTORY — Superintendent Robert Southwell White in pictured on the gangplank. From 
Southern Views, Codes?; Collection. 

The Troup Factory was ten miles southeast of LaG range, on Flat Shoals Creek. The mill build- 
ing, a wooden structure, "strong and well built," four stories high, was 76 feet long x 46 feet wide. 

Troup Factory was then "running 1,650 spindles," In addition, there was older and earlier equip- 
ment consisting of 500 "mule" spindles "not at work at present" 

"Mule" Spindles for Spinning 

Troup Factory and other early cotton mills relied for years on "mule" spindles for spinning their 
yarns. In its day, "mule" spinning was a great advance in textile manufacturing. In 1878, it was out- 
of-date, inefficient and superseded. 

"Modern" equipment went into Troup Factory when it began operations in 1847 and the "mule" 
spinning was installed. In textile manufacturing history, Richard Arkwright, the English inventor of 
the spinning machine, obtained his first patent for spinning with rollers in 1769. His "water- frame" 
twisted the cotton roving into a thread called "water-twist" because of the water power used m turn- 
ing his machine. 

[331] 



The "water-frame" lacked the ability to make thread as strong as desired. It remained for James 
Hargreaves to invent a spinning machine known as the 'spinning jenny," for multiple spinning of 
threads. When the ''spinning jenny" was used with the Arkwright spinning frame, a product was 
turned out as fine and as strong as needed for cotton cloth. 

Another textile pioneer, a weaver named Compton, successfully combined the "water-frame" and 
"spinning jenny" into a new machine called the "mule/' 

Troup Factory Looms and Products 

Troup Factory, according to the Robertson and Leslie ad in 1878, had "50 looms on [manufactur- 
ing] Osnaburgs, stripes, checks, denims and kerseys," Yarns, cotton and woolen, were spun for sale 
and the factory operated a dye plant for "dyeing part of them various colors." 

The manufacturer's name of the looms was not given, but they were probably made by Lowell 
Machine Shops, of Lowell, Massachusetts, early builders of cotton carding, spinning, weaving and fin- 
ishing machinery used in a cotton factory. Loom width was 35 inches. 

Qsnaburgs were manufactured in patterns of stripes and checks. Denims were fabrics derived 
in name from serge of Nimes, France, the serge originally a twilled worsted fabric used for suits, coats 
and dresses. As made by Troup Factory, denim was a coarse cotton drilling [fabric having a diag- 
onal weave] used for overalls, work clothes and other things, including carpeting. 

Dallas & Gray, merchants of LaGrange, were agents for Troup Factory products in 1379, and 
advertised in the LaGrange Reporter "New Troup Factory Carpets." They also advised their patrons to 
"Get colored Knittings [knitting yarns] at Troup Factory" in 1B79. 

Kerseys were cloths derived in name from Kersey, a village of Suffolk, England, where originally 
was woven a kind of woolen cloth, usually coarse and ribbed. Troup Factory kerseys were made into 
trousers, coats and perhaps other garments. 

Additional facilities of Troup Factory were named as "an excellent Press House [cotton cloth bal- 
ing press and waste baling room], Dye House, Boiler and Dry Rooms [for dyed yarns]." 

Troup Factory was "turning out from 50 f 000 to 60,000 yards of cloth monthly," according to the 
advertisement. Its machines were water power driven, and it was noted that "all the waterwheels 

[taking the fall of the water for power] are patent iron and in good order." 

Troup Factory Village 

On the hillside above the factory, across the road from the Troup Factory village proper, were 
"three or four nice cottage residences for proprietors and agents [of the factory]." Situated on the 
hillside where the employees lived were "27 good, two room houses for operatives, all near and con- 
venient with good springs and wells convenient to all" 

"Indeed," the advertisement stated, "the whole premises ... are in good repair and well arranged 
for comfort. Place healthy, well shaded, and handsome, with a church on premises and others near 
also post office and tri- weekly mail." 

Grist and Flour Mills 

Troup Factory had been in the grist mill business since its beginning as Brooks' Mill, continued 
profitably since 1847 by Robertson, Leslie & Company. "Very near to the factory, in twenty feet 
[of it] , stands a two story flouring mill, with good runners and machinery, bolting cloths, &c." The 
flouring mill was equipped with a bolter, a machine with sliding runners and bolting cloths used to 
sift or "bolt" flour and meal Bran was separated from the flour by the action of the bolter, producing 
"fine" flour. Corn meal was coarsely ground and generally not bolted. 

Products of Troup Factory grist milling were well known to generations of Troup County and 
Meriwether County patrons, expressed in the statement, "The mill has a good run of custom, and the 
proceeds of the grain sold [at the mill door or loading platform] without hauling off [to other mar- 
ket]." 

Land, Cotton, Store and Inventory 

"The whole premises" of Troup Factory then contained "about 1,100 acres of land. Much of it 
is good farming land. At least 500 acres of it should be in cotton and corn for the use of the place 
[i.e., factory consumption and sale] . Perhaps half of the lands are in [hard] woods and partly in 
pine. All our fire- works [boiler, fireplaces and stoves for heating various buildings], use pine entirely 
and the quantity will be everlasting." 

[332] 






Baled cotton for Troup Factory was stored on the premises, in a warehouse, and in warehouses 
of LaGrange and Chipley merchants. "We usually have on hand 100 to 300 bales of cotton (now 
150)," it was stated. 

At the Troup Factory Store, "a splendid rock store [building] 60 feet long by 40 feet wide," Robert- 
son, Leslie & Company carried a "stock of goods . . . stock generally S7,000. to $10,000., now per- 
haps $8,000. Annual sales $20,000. to $25,000." 

In storage at the factory was a stock of manufactured goods. "All manufactured goods on hand 
and in the hands of agents, we propose to dispose of ourselves, but would make a heavy reduction 
on them [i.e., make a generous discount] and close the whole out if so desired. That stock is perhaps 
$20,000." 

The North & South Rail Road, a narrow gauge line, was still under construction. It was men- 
tioned: 

The North & South Rail Road, which will be finished from Columbus to Rome, runs with- 
in Va mile of the mills and will add several thousand dollars to the value, 

Mr. Robertson, 69, and Mr. Leslie, 66, stated "To persons wishing such an estate, who are younger 
men, this is a rare chance. Everything is in order — all going and all ready, No waiting to build every- 
thing, say, one to three years. No loss of interest on capital and risk of fire or flood. The day 
possession is given you commence business and profits." 

The business is pleasant, having now a full run of custom which consumes the proceeds as 
fast as manufactured. We retire from the business solely for the reasons already stated. 

The Troup Factor property, including "all the tools, wagons and eight mules s " for "possession 
immediately, or at any time within the next six months," was offered for a price of S80,000. Terms 
were stated to be "one half cash, and one, two, three and four years credit on the balance at seven 
per cent per annum." 

The property cost us largely ovev that amount and will pay a fine profit on the investment 
if well managed. Persons, or a company desiring such property will, of course, examine it — 
the titles, location, and it* future chances of success. 

Our Mr. Leslie is and will be on the place to exhibit and explain what is necessary to 
know. 

To capitalists within fifty miles around the description is unnecessary. Those living farther may 
wish a formal description of the property in this notice. 

In reference to the stock of cotton on hand, 150 bales, it was specified that 'The cotton must 
be paid for in net cash." Terms for the "stock of dry goods in [Troup Factory] Store," were "half 
cash, and other half in six and twelve months." 

"Written communications will be kept strictly private, if so desired," Mr. Robertson and Mr. Leslie 
stated. The notice of "Troup Factory for Sale' 1 appeared in the newspapers for perhaps two months. 
Apparently no acceptable bidder came forward, so Troup Factory continued under the same manage- 
ment. 

A Dog Law Needed 

Mr, Leslie advertised in the LuGnmge Reporter for August 22, 1878 that "Troup Factory wants 
Wool Carding." The supply must have been "short," for he said: 

This is the last time we will advertise 'Wool Carding' unless a dog law is passed. 
There are 6,000 dogs in Troup County and most of them are curs of low degree, and all badly 
fed. 

"What chance do the sheep have to live and make wool? 

"Factory Boy" Again 

"Factory Boy t! wrote to the editor of the LuG range Reporter and some of the news of the Troup 
Factory community appeared in the issue of September 30, 1873, Saying "Marriage is honorable to all," 
he told how "A young lady eluded her parents, met her lover, and they married last Wednesday night 
near the [Factory] church at this place. The young lady's father heard of his daughter's marriage 
soon after it took place, and with profound philosophy exclaimed that 'He could not help it now.' " 

One of our citizens who is a great believer in sciolism [superficial knowledge] has just 
given your correspondent a rather strange idea, that the introduction of guano is the cause of 
the recent tornadoes, and he can demonstrate the fact to any unbiased mind, (Send out your 
scientist, he is getting too deep for this writer). 

We ventured to impose the following question: 'Mr. R, how can the loss of lives be prevent- 
ed in the paths of these terrible winds?' In answer he said that the only effectual way, in his 

[333] 




knowledge, was to make observations with a spyglass and when danger is imminent, flee to a hole 
in the ground. 

Said I, 'We understand you so far, but suppose the threatening clouds should come at night 
— what about the spyglass then? 5 

In deep meditation and profound silence, he 'passed.' 

Letterheads of 1878 

Letterheads of Robertson, Leslie & Company, in 1878, advertised themselves to be "Merchants 
and Manufacturers of Heavy Cotton Checks and Stripes, White and Colored Cotton Yarn, Heavy and 
Light Osnaburgs, Mattresses, &c, &c." The names of the partners, J. M. C. Robertson and T. Leslie, ap- 
peared at upper left and right hand corners, respectively. 

John Lemuel Robertson, son of James Madison Creed Robertson, lived at Troup Factory in 1878, 
He addressed his father, "Dear Pa," on October 14, in a note concerning the leasing of the Elisha 
Kendall place and land of the Robertson homeplace "on shares" for the coming year. 

"All well with us," the son wrote. "Wish you'd send my couch when your wagon comes down, 
You will have bags [in the wagon] and it can rest on them." 

Troup Factory Declines 

Although ably managed during the Panic of 1873 and subsequent years of the Grant administra- 
tion, Troup Factory began to decline. The unsuccessful attempt to sell it in 1878 was of concern to the 
aging partners, Robertson and Leslie. A great capital outlay was necessary if they replaced the worn 
machinery. Annual interest, too heavy for much reduction to be made in their indebtedness, dimmed 
the future prospects of the enterprise. 

On Thursday, March 3, 1881 there appeared in the LaQrange Reporter confirmation of what many 
had heard and feared, 

A rumor was in circulation last week to the effect that the proprietors of Troup Factory 
had failed. The factory has been in successful operation 35 years and the report was quite a sur- 
prise, 

Messrs, Robertson, Leslie & Co., the proprietors, have called for a meeting oX the creditors, 
nearly all of whom live in this section. The liabilities of the firm are about $50,000., with assets 
of an available nature, together with cash on hand amounting to $20,000., the factory grain mil], 
and eleven hundred acres of land. It is the opinion of many that at a fair evaluation this will 
meet all indebtedness. 

Attesting to the high financial stability of the proprietors, the article stated that "Mr. Thomas 
Leslie, of this county, and Mr. J. M. C. Robertson, of Meriwether County, comprise the firm, and 
have been partners for nearly forty years. Their paper [note and credit obligations] has always been 
among the best until recently." 

Ten years ago, one half interest in the above mill and property was owned by the Beemans 
[David E. Becman and Isaac C- Beeman] formerly well known in this section. 

For this interest, $23,000. was paid and very soon afterwards, $17,000. in improvements were 
made by adding new machinery and otherwise improving the property. 

There was also a total loss of $5,000. by subscription to the North & South narrow gauge 
railroad. 

The panic of 1373 caused considerable loss, and since that time the annual interest has been 
too heavy for much reduction to be made on their indebtedness. 

"The factory is still running," the article concluded, "and a meeting of the creditors will be held 
today, when matters will be quietly adjusted, as we are confident they will." 

"A meeting has been held by the creditors of Messrs, Robertson, Leslie & Co,, proprietors of Troup 
Factory," the Reporter stated in its issue of March 10, 1881, "and as we predicted last week, matters 
have been quietly adjusted. The liabilities amounted to $54,000. They had on hand $25,000. cash assets, 
besides the factory, grain mill, lands, etc., which at a fair evaluation was found adequate to pay 
every dollar of indebtedness. The factory will be under the management of a new company." 

In Meriwether County, the Vindicator for Friday, March 11, 1881 carried an article about the "Fail- 
ure at Troup Factory," stating "The recent failure of Messrs. Robertson and Leslie, the owners of 
Troup Factory, startled our people like a clap of thunder from a clear sky, The proprietors were part- 
ners in Greenville as merchants over forty years ago and have always been regarded as the best 
men in the country." 

Somewhere about 1847 they purchased the Brooks 1 Mill property in Troup County and erected 
a cotton factory upon its site. Their enterprise prospered and was the best paying property in the 
state, Mr, Leslie personally superintending its operation. 

[334] 









Fortunately, although nearly in the line of march of the Wilson's cavalry raid in 1865, the 
factory escaped destruction, the party sent to burn it being told it had already been destroy- 
ed, and were thus turned back before reaching their destination. 

After the war, being free from debt, about twenty thousand dollars of new and improved 
machinery was added, and the demand for the goods manufactured far exceeded the ability to 
supply them. 

The health of both partners failing, each of them being about 70 years of age, they were unable 
to give that close attention to the business that had marked their earlier partnership. The panic 
of 1873 brought on indebtedness, which, although the business continued profitable, increased 
with late years. 

Mr. Leslie becoming feebler through severe illness, Mr. Robertson, before Christmas [1880] went 
to the factory and took stock and endeavored to find out the liabilities of the partnership. 
Discovering that the debts amounted to $54,000., and he and Mr, Leslie not being able to look 
after the business, they concluded to call in the creditors and give up the property. The prop- 
osition was gladly acceded to, as the property surrendered is largely in excess of the debts. 
The Vindicator, whose editor, W. T. Rev ill, was a close personal friend of the partners, opined 
that "Were Messrs, Robertson and Leslie thirty years younger they would have no difficulty in keep- 
ing their properly and paying up every dollar they owed. But being old, they preferred settling the 
matter without the annoyances of probable lawsuits. The property cost about one hundred thousand 
dollars and is richly worth every dollar the firm put into it." 

Instead of compromising their debts, as is the usual custom, for fifty cents on the dollar, 
these gentlemen have given up a valuable property double the amount of their indebtedness. 
What a striking example of genuine honor and integrity! 
Creditors of Troup Factory were "so astonished at the noble and generous action" of Mr. Robert- 
son and Mr. Leslie that they "voluntarily presented them with five thousand dollars stock in the 
new company." 

Those who have known Messrs. Robertson and Leslie for half a century never doubted their 
honor and integrity and their recent conduct shows that the high confidence was not misplaced. 
The credit of the firm stood high in the market and the voluntary surrender was made only 
to get rid of an honest indebtedness while the principals were alive. 

The creditors, the largest of whom live in Troup County, have formed a joint stock company 
and the factory will continue to run as usual. 

The New Troup Factory 

An application for incorporation of the Troup Factory "new company" was made to the Superior 
Court of Troup County, by citizens of Troup and Meriwether counties, who "associated themselves 
together and desire an order of incorporation declaring them a body corporate under the corporate 
name of Troup Factory for the term of twenty years," 

It was stated that the object of "said association and the business to be carried on under said 
name" was the manufacture of cotton yarns, woolen goods, threads, yarns, etc. Capital of $46,500. 
was "to be employed and entirely paid in for carrying out the object of said association," with the 
privilege of increasing capital to S60,GQ0., if desired. The principal place of doing business was to be 
Troup County, Georgia. 

Ferrell & Longley, of LaGrange, were attorneys for petitioners and published the necessary "true 
extract" from the Minutes of Troup Superior Court in the LaGmnge Reporter for March 31, 1BBL 

The petitioners desired "corporate authority to govern themselves by such rules and by-laws as 
may be proper — with power to purchase, hold and enjoy both real and personal property." 

An order was petitioned to be granted by the court "declaring them, and their successors, a body 
corporate under said name of Troup Factory, with all the powers necessary for the purpose of their 
organization." 

Petitioners from Troup County were: 

Gary & Butler Herndon, B. H. Smith, Mary 

Cleveland, Sarah C. C, Huntley, Sr., W. H. Smith, S. P. 

Dallis, Sr. h H. W. LaGrange Banking & Trust Co., The Smith, Thomas W. 

Davidson, Allen Leslie, Thomas Swanson, S. W. 

Farrow, Thomas Loyd, James Truitt, J. M. 

Ferrell, B. G Perry, J. O, White, Nannie 

Glanton, T. O, White - R°^rt 

There were only three petitioners from Meriwether County: John W. Park, J, M. C. Robertson 
and J. W. Stinson. 

[335] 








TROUP FACTORY OPERATIVES - Posed in front of the factory. Superintendent While in hat and 
vent at far left. From Southern- Views, Corless Collection. 

Cotton and Meat 

John Lemuel Robertson, son of James M. C. Robertson, was living at LaGrange in lS32 r He wrote 
his father, "Dear Fa," from the LaGrange office of Troup Factory on February 10, 1832: 

Your cotton weighed 540-565-1105 lbs. at lOVitf, $116.02. I could not get more than 10 Vit and 
I did not see the use of storing it when you need the money for other uses. 

Cotton hag been declining for some days and yesterday was only worth 11%C in New York 
a clear drop of V 4 c, To know what it will do hereafter is an impossibility — and to take the chances 
as you did last year & put cotton in warehouse, with expenses daily growing against it is 
poor policy when you have a use for the money invested in it. 

Such is my idea. If hereafter you do not 
think with me you can order positively what you 
want done and I will follow your order. 

I bought [three] plowstock at SI, 65 = $4,95. 
Send you back $111.07. 

The general store, or commissary, at Troup 
Factory was a part of the company's operations. 
Meats were kept on hand for sale to the factory 
workers, along with many other items of groceries 
and dry goods. Mr. Robertson said: 

Meat here is worth 10^0 lb. They say worth 
that in Atlanta. One party says he would shade 
that price in order to effect a sale today — that 
I don't know, but think very probable. 

On rising market, this place is about as good 
as Atlanta. On falling market, not so good. At- 
lanta pulsates with western market more closely 
and meat has been advancing for several days. 

[330] 




TROUP FACTORY STORE AND COMMISSARY 
Operated by Robertson, Leslie C~ Co. A rock build- 
ing described in, 1878 as being W feet by 40 feci. 
Ruins of the building may still be seen on the west 
aide of Flat Shoals Creek. The store teas at the 
approach of the first of fico covered bridges, "dou- 
ble bridges" crossing Perry Creek and Flat Shoals 
Creek at Troup Factory. Corless Collect ion 



It is said that it costs 10 Vic to lay it down [deliver at destination] here now. Where these men 
have some stocks bought at lower prices they will not ask as much and require full prices. 
"Mary [his wife] and children are well," he wrote. "We have been trying to do a little gardening 
— have sowed the smaller seed. Irish potatoes are worth here 70c a peck. If you have any sweet 
potatoes to spare, send me a few to eat when you send up again, I have reserved a good spot to 

raise them this year. 

"I wish you and Ma would drive over [from Greenville] some Friday & spend Saturday & Sunday 
with us. Ma's butter comes in good time. We were just out & it is scarce at this time. Come over 
as soon as you can and see how we are situated — the place & how fixed." 

Mr. Robertson wrote on the new Troup Factory letterhead, ornate with fancy type fonts and em- 
bellishments of the period. The arrangement was like this: 

Directors: 
B. C. Ferrell A. D. Abraham, President Jno. W, Park 

W. H. Huntley S. P. Smith 

TROUP FACTORY 

Manufactures 

Heavy Cotton Checks and Stripes, 

White and Colored Cotton Yarns, 

Heavy and Light Osnabuigs, Mattresses, Etc. 

LaGrange, Ga --- -188. 

Office and Ware -rooms 
LaGrange, Ga. 
The message about the products of Troup Factory was the same as used on the old letterhead of 
Robertson, Leslie & Company, 

Success of New Management 

Troup Factory operations under the new management of 1881 were termed a "very remarkable 
success" by the Columbus Daihj Enquirer Sun in an article dated Friday, May 16, 1884. 

At a meeting of the stockholders on Tuesday, May 13, 1884 a dividend of $1,904.00 was declared 
out of earnings of the past six months. This amounted to more than 4 f A on the capital stock. 

The six semi-annual dividends declared since the reorganization of Robertson, Leslie & Company in 
1881 as Troup Factory amounted to $11,524.00. 

The reserve fund of cash on hand amounted to $13,056.48. Added to the $11,524.00 dividends 
paid, the gross profit for three years was $24,580,43. "In other words," the Enquirer stated, "the fac- 
tory has about paid for itself within this period. This reserve does not include money already spent in 
repairs, which has been considerable, but that actually on hand." 

At the annual meeting of 1884, Anderson D. Abraham, one of the founders of The LaGrange Bank- 
ing & Trust Company, was re-elected president of Troup Factory. Blount C. Ferrell, John W. Park, 
Samuel Paul Smith and James Monroe Truitt, all petitioners for the new corporation in 1881, were chosen 

directors. 

In the LaGrange Reporter of May L5, 1884 the current financial statement of Troup Factory was pub- 
lished, "as exhibited to and approved by the Board of Directors at the regular annual meeting held 
May 13, 1884, Published by order of the Board." 

Annual Return of the Condition 

of 

Troup Factory 

April 30, 1884 



Liabilities 




Capital Stock 


$47,000.00 


Accounts Payable 


1,909.28 


Bill Payable 11/15/84 


2,557.06 


Semi-Annual Dividend 


1,904.00 


Surplus Fund 


13,056.4S 




$66,426.82 



Resources 
930 Acres of Land, Machinery, &c. 
Cash Deposited in Bank 
Cotton on Hand 
Goods on Hand, or Unpaid For 
Accounts Receivable 
Bills Receivable 

Warp, Filling and Cotton in Process 
Waste and Old Bagging 
Factory Supplies and Dyestuffs 
Four Mules and One Wagon 
Office Furniture and Iron Safe 



$31,500.00 

4,260.SS> 

8,909.38 

16,896.00 

1,450.55 

200.00 

2,000.00 

135.00 

475,00 

500.00 

100.00 

$66,426.82 



[337] 




Troup Factory Shut Down 

At summer's end, 1834, the Troup Factory "shut down for the time being," it was noted in the 
LaCrtmge Importer for Friday, September 26, 1884. "Whether for too little water [for water power 
derived from Flat Shoals Creek], or 'too much cloth; we have not been informed. It is a prosperous 
enterprise when there is any sale for goods." 

Road to Troup Factory 

From LaGrange to Troup Factory, thence to Chipley [now Pine Mountain] in Harris County the 
road went up and down some "painful hills" for travelers in buggies, carriages, wagons and even on 
horseback. Rainy weather turned the narrow thoroughfare into muddy ruts of red clay. Dry weather 
saw the dust fly and the vanishing of whatever topsoil was on the road. 

A Troup Factory correspondent writing in the Reporter for April 15, 1886 said the "read to Troup 
Factory is in fair condition, but might be improved. Owing to the continued dry weather, all [roads] 
are harder and firmer, but full of ruts, stones and inequalities. 

"The present Grand Jury could do great good by looking closely and conscientiously after the 
county roads. 

"If we were asked what is the first requisite of local prosperity, we would answer; Good roads 
And what is the second? Better roads. And what the third? The best roads that can be made" 




SUPERINTENDENT WHITE on a gangplank over the "water 
house' where power was derived from Flat Shoals Creek. Rear view 
of old Brooks Mill ["Flouring Mill"], left foreground^ and Troup 
Factory in background. Corlew Collection, Soutttkiin Views. 



Oats, Mill and Gin 

lr\ the Troup Factory news ap- 
pearing in the Reporter for May 20, 
1886 the first item was about Leslie 
W, Dallis having the "best patch of 
oats in the settlement." 

James Oliver Perry was "making 
arrangements to build a corn [grist] 
mill and [cotton] ginnery near the 
Troup Factory Jim is like the little 
boy. He is into all manner of devil- 
ment and is the luckiest man I ever 
saw," the correspondent said. 

New Machinery for Troup Factory 

Practically all of the machinery 
in Troup Factory was obsolete when 
it shut down in 1834, in spite of ex- 
penditures since the Civil War. It 
was a time of decision. Management 
could quit or renew. 

The officers and directors decid- 
ed to make additional capital invest- 
ment in the property to equip prac- 
tically a new mill. The Reporter's 
correspondent at Troup Factory, 
''Levi," wrote in the issue of May 20 
1836' 

The putting up of the new ma- 
chinery at Troup Factory \$ now go- 
ing on, Its Jong suspension has been 
a great calamity to this portion of 
the county, and especially to some of 
the young bucks in this neighbor- 
hood [i.e., the young fellows about 
town did not have much spending 
money!]. 



[33S] 



We hope soon to hear the old familiar ring from its walls [a bell was rung early in the 
morning and at quitting time] that the writer has been accustomed to hear for over thirty years. 

The then president of Troup Factory, John Lemuel Robertson, announced in the LaGrange Re- 
porter for June 3, 1886 "that all of the new machinery — 52 looms and 1,600 spindles — for Troup 
Factory has arrived and is now being placed in position by three machinists from Lowell, where it 
was purchased. Mr. Robertson thinks the factory will be ready to start again by July 15, at the 
latest. This is good news, after the long suspension." 

It was reported further that "The outfit is all of modern make, and when everything has been put 
in readiness, the factory will be a new one and one of the most thoroughly equipped in the state. 
That part of the county will soon feel the impetus of the enterprise, now placed beyond all ap- 
prehension of failure," 

Dockham's Textile Directory for 1888 listed Troup Factory with capital of $47,600. Sheetings, shirt- 
ings and drills were produced. There were 52 looms and 1,600 spindles, water power driven. 

Austin, Bates & Wellington, of New York, were Selling Agents for Troup Factory. This may have 
been the first time the Troup Factory was represented by a Northern selling firm. 

Worth Street in New York, a concentration of commission and selling houses for the cotton 
textile industry, was important then. It grew to be the principal market for the production of the in- 
dustry. 

Customarily, cotton cloth was consigned by the mills to the selling agents, to be sold at the 
Worth Street auctions. A commission was taken for selling and guaranteeing the credit of the buyer. 

A direct New York connection, particularly in view of Troup Factory's entry into the sheet- 
ings and shirtings market, was advantageous. The sights of the new corporation were set beyond 
those of Thomas Leslie, so long the agent identified with production and selling at Troup Factory. 

John L. Robertson was president, with Robert S. White, superintendent. 

Thomas Leslie 

Thomas Leslie, of the original Troup Factory firm of Robertson, Leslie & Company, who was asso- 
ciated in business with James Madison Creed Robertson for about 43 years, died on March 24, 1887. 
He was born May 19, 1312 In Wilkes County, Georgia- 
Lesley was one of the various spellings of the name in Revolutionary War times. His grandfather, 
Thomas Lesley, was born about 1750. About 1774 he moved from Virginia to Wilkes County, Georgia. 
In 1779 he moved to South Carolina, where he served in the South Carolina militia regiment of Col- 
onel Pickens. 

Four children were born to Thomas and Frances Lesley: Thomas, Lydia, Mary and Hannah. 
Thomas Lesley, the father, died in 1800 in Wilkes County, Georgia. 

Thomas Leslie, son of Thomas and Frances Lesley (Leslie), was born in Wilkes County about 1779, 
Catherine Thornton, daughter of William and Sarah Thornton, of Wilkes County, became his bride 
in 1804. 

Thomas and Catherine Thornton Leslie were the parents of six children: Sarah, David, Felix, 
Mary, Thomas and Media. The father was a justice of the peace several years and a member of 
Colonel Wootten's regiment of Wilkes County militia, serving against the Indians in Georgia and Ala- 
bama during the 1814 campaigns. 

Mr. Leslie died in 1826, Mrs. Leslie was later married to Ignatius Russell, of Troup County. 
They had no children. 

When Thomas Leslie, son of Thomas and Catherine Thornton Leslie, was about seventeen, he 
opened a merchandise store in Hamilton, Harris County. About 1831 he moved to Warm Springs, Meri- 
wether County, and was in business there several years. 

While living at Warm Springs, Thomas Leslie returned to Wilkes County to marry Louisa Vil- 
liers Anderson on September 3, 1835. The marriage rites were read by the Rev. Enoch Callaway, 
noted Baptist preacher whose son, the Rev. Abner Reeves Callaway, later lived on a plantation in 
Meriwether County near Greenville, 

In 1838, Thomas Leslie moved to Greenville from Warm Springs. There he began his long part- 
nership with James Madison Creed Robertson. 

Mrs. Louisa Villiers Anderson Leslie was born August 25, 1815 in Wilkes County and died June 
27, 1891 in Troup County. She and her husband are buried in the Crowder Family Cemetery at Mark 
Hall plantation, Meriwether County. 

[339] 




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MRS, THOMAS LESLIE (1S15-1S91) 
Nee Louisa V Hilars Anderson, She was married io 
Thomas Leslie in Wilkes Count tj, Ga., September 3, 
1835, Courtesy Mrs. Henry S. Crowder, Sr. 



THOMAS LESLIE (1812-1887) 
Partner, manager and agent of Troup Factory (Rob- 
ertson, Leslie 6 Co.) 1846-1881. Courtesy Mrs, 
Henry S. Croveder, Sr.. Warm Springs, Ga. 



She was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Tate Anthony Anderson. Her father was a Georgia 
soldier of the War of 1812. He was born February IS, 1772 in Bedford County, Virginia and died 
March 4, 1861 in Wilkes County, Georgia, 

Her mother was born January 16, 1774 in Henry County, Virginia and died December 5, 1866 in 
Wilkes County, Georgia. She was married to Thomas Anderson on April 12, 1799 in Wilkes County, 
and was the daughter of James and Nancy Tate Anthony of Henry County, Virginia. She was their 
tenth and youngest child. 

The children of Thomas and Louisa Villiers Anderson Leslie were: 



Katherine li Kate" Leslie 

born August 22, 1836 

married to Henry Eppes Moss 

on April 10, i860 

born September 24, 1833 

died December 11, 1885 

she died May 3, 1908 

Issue: 9 children 

Anderson Leslie 

bom December 28, 1837 

married Virginia A. Reid 

on December 20, 1859 

died 1873 

Issue: 5 children 

Frances "Fannie*' Leslie 

born August 5, 1839 

died August, 1342 

Robert Leslie 

born April 15, 1841 

married Mollie Truitt 

in October, 186$ 



Issue: 4 children 

(In 1882; no later record) 

5. William p. Leslie 
born September 6, 1842 
died in infancy 

6. Elizabeth Ll Lizzie !f Leslie 
born October IB, 1343 
died June 6, 1914 
never married 

7. Sarah "Sallie" Leslie 
born May 19, 1845 

married to Dr. Andrew Edward Beasley 
on July 9, 1867 

died March 27, 1928 
Issue: 4 children 

8. Thomas Leslie 

born November 12, 184S 
died June 22, 1864 
never married 



[340] 



10. 



Jeannette "Jennie" Leslie 

born June 1, 184B 

died June 13, 1902 

married to Henry Scott "Hal" Crowder 

on October 26 t 1S71 

Issue: 7 children 

Louisa Leslie 

born September 7, 1851 

married to Leslie Wellington Dallis 

on May 15, 1872 



died February 18, 1943 
No issue 
11. Mary "Mollie" Leslie 
born May 11, 1353 
married to Abner Thomas Dallis 
on May 15, 1872 
died May 1, 1883 
No issue 



Robert Leslie and Thomas Leslie were Confederate soldiers. Thomas was stationed for a while at 
Andersonville, Georgia at the prisoner camp. He came home to Troup Factory on a short furlough. Prob- 
ably suffering from his malady on arrival, he became sick with "inflammation of the bowels," and 
died in two or three days. He and others of the family are buried in the Leslie Family Cemetery at 
Troup Factory, 

Wedding of Jeannette Leslie 

A wedding invitation of Henry Scott and Jeannette Leslie Crowder is preserved in the records 
of their descendants. The bride was a baby when her father moved to Troup Factory from Meri- 
wether County, Henry Scott "Hal" Crowder was born in Meriwether County on May 5, 1846. The invi- 
tation reads: 

You are respectfully invited to 

Mr. & Mrs, Thos. Leslie's 

Troup Factory, Ga, 

October 26th 7^ P.M. 1871 

to the 

Ma rringc Ceremony 

of 

Hal S. Crowder Jennie Leslie 

Troup Factory people loved the pretty bride, Jennie Leslie, They rejoiced with her in her hap- 
piness. Good looking Hal Crowder was well known to them during the courtship. All felt they had 
a part in the "big doings" at the Leslie home the day of her marriage! 

Thomas Leslie's Will 

In the Troup County census of 1860, Thomas Leslie was listed as a merchant by occupation, with 
$1,000. of real estate and $40,000, of personal estate. His son, Robert Leslie, 19, had occupation as 
farmer. 

Anderson Leslie, eldest son of Thomas Leslie, was listed as a merchant. James Rudney, 22, born 
in Georgia, and his family, lived in the Anderson Leslie household. Rudney was a farmer, 

Thomas Leslie made his last will and testament on August 22, 1864, "being aware of the uncer- 
tainty of life and the certainty of death, and wishing to place my affairs in a proper condition while 
alive and in health. iy To his wife, Mrs. Louisa Villiers Anderson Leslie, he bequeathed all the furni- 
ture and household articles "now on my premises/' and one fourth of all his estate, "either to be 
divided as it stands or to be sold if thought best and her part paid to her in money." 

Concerning his Troup Factory investment, he willed "that whenever my Factory interest can be 
sold at something like par for it to be sold and the balance of proceeds divided equally with my 
children, to be kept by guardian until they (the youngest) becomes of age or marry." 

He noted that his eldest children, Anderson and Katherine Leslie "have received some portion 
of their legacy which can be seen on memorandum; that, of course, comes in before they receive 
any more. I desire for all my children to share equally." 

His friend, James Madison Creed Robertson, with Mrs, Leslie, were appointed executors. The wit- 
nesses to the will were other old time friends at Troup Factory, James D. Hardy, B. McKigney and 
Thomas A. Perry. 

Thomas Leslie added a codicil to his will on April 28, 1871. He found his affairs changed "insomuch 
that two of my children, Sally and Robert have married and have been given about two thousand dol- 
lars in cash & other property which is charged to them on my little book. They, of course, like 
the older two, cannot draw any more until all the younger children are made up to that amount." 

He noted that since the will was written, "I have given and sold to my son, A. Leslie, one fourth 
of my half interest in Troup Factory property (see his check) except dividends to 1st Jan. 1871, for 
§7,500. Of this he owes me $3,000. (see his note)." 

[341] 







GRAVESTONE OK THOMAS LESLIE 
In Crowder Family Cemetery, Mark Hull Planta- 
tion, near Greenville, Meriwether County, Ga. 

His bequest to Mrs. Leslie was changed to "give her one fourth of all my present estate in my 
whole property, lands, notes, cash & indeed everything I possess, including Factory interest, in every 
shape, besides the house & furniture mentioned ill the 1st part of this instrument" 

It was his advice to his wife that the Troup Factory interest be sold and she "retire from it, but 
to hold if she desires." The balance of his estate was to go equally to all his children, to be divided or 
sold as they might agree. 

The witnesses to the codicil were W. V. Gray, John Thompson and Thomas A. Perry. 

William Varnum Cray 

The first witness to the codicil was William Varnum Gray, the son of Davis Gray and Mrs. Media 
Leslie (Jones) Gray. Her first husband, Willis Jones, of Harris County, died in 1338. There were three 
children. She was married to Davis Gray of Harris County in 1830. They lived near Hamilton and 
ten children were born to them. In the winter of 1351, the Grays moved to Greenwood, Jackson County, 
Florida. About 1866 or 1867, they moved to Maury County, Tennessee. Mrs. Gray died in 1874 and 
Mr. Gray in 1879 or 1380. 

After the Civil War, William Varnum Gray came to Troup Factory to work for his uncle, Thomas 
Leslie, He was a clerk in the Troup Factory Store and was later bookkeeper. 

George Elbert Dallas (1855-1913), and Virgil E. Dallis (1853-1928), of Troup Factory, began a dry 
goods business in LaGrange in the 1870's. They hired "Willie" Gray as their bookkeeper. He became 
a partner and bought the business about 1880. W. V. Gray Dry Goods Company, on East Court Sqi 
LaGrange, operated until he retired about 1914, 

Mr, Gray was one of the incorporators of The LaGrange Oil & Manufacturing Company, char- 
tered in 1883, to extract cotton seed oil The plant later ; as LaGrange Mills, manufactured cotton textiles. 



While at Troup Factory, Willie Gray met Ella Willis Render of Meriwether County, who visit- 
ed her aunt, Mrs. Thomas Leslie. They were married in 1876. She was the daughter of Robert Lewis 
and Elizabeth Harris Anderson Render. She- was born February 3, 1651 and died June 10, 1923. 

There were six children born to the Grays. Three sons died of diseases now preventable, Elizabeth 
"Lizzie" Gray was a teacher and married to Robert L. Adams. Mabel Gray was for many years sec- 
retary to the general manager and president of Dunson Mills, a cotton textile plant of LaGrange, Ellie 
Gray became a teacher and Methodist missionary in Korea. 

Troup Factory in 1888 

Troup Factory, in 1888, had a population of 200. according to Georgia Stale Gazetteer, Business and 
Planters 1 Directory" 1888-89, A. E. Sholes, Compiler. The mail was tri-weekly and C. T. Freeman was 
postmaster. LaGrange was its center for bank, rail depot, telegraph and express office. 

Thomas Brooks then operated a grist mill and gin at Troup Factory, Leslie W. Dallis was a 
lumber manufacturer. B, H. Herndon operated a tannery and was a shoemaker. Hansom Bros. & Free- 
man operated a general merchandise store in the old Troup Factory Store building. The Rev. W. B. 
Cotter was listed as a Methodist minister at Troup Factory. Dr. William Patrick Gaffney was the 
physician in the community. He was born May 17, 1857 and died April 9, 1922. 

B. H. Herndon was born September 27, 1821 and died January 27, 1897, He and his wife, Mrs. 
Frances Herndon, born December 3, 1825 and died November 12, 1908 are buried in the Herndon 
Family Cemetery. 

James Day Hardy 

On October 22, 18S8 James Day Hardy died at Troup Factory, Georgia. He was a member of 
Troup Factory Lodge No, 115 F, Si A. M, The lodge adopted unanimous resolutions on the passing of 
its member, stating "Brother Hardy was one of the pioneers of Troup County's settlement, one of the 
old guard who have given our county its name and fame as the home of a people possessed of all 
the elements of true and exalted manhood." 

Brother Hardy was true and sincere in all the relations of life, generous, liberal and hos- 
pitable, a. man of great energy and industry, applying himself with assiduous persistence to 
whatever his hand found to do. 

His open-handed generosity was ever extended to any call for individual aid or public enter- 
prise, and we feel that his death has caused a void in our community which wiJl be difficult to fill. 
It was resolved that "a page be left blank upon our minute book in token of our esteem for the 
memory of our deceased brother,** 

James Day Hardy was the son of Thomas Hardy (1795-1870), and wife, Susan Day Hardy (1801- 
1862). He was born December 12, 1819. In 1840 he married Mary Jane Gates, bom March 6, 1822 and 
died October 25, 1852. She was the daughter of James Rowland Gates (1794-1863X and wife, Elizabeth 
Cox Gates (1706-1874), whose old home still stands in the County Line Community. 

James Day Hardy married (2) Ann E. Allen, born March 6, 1834 and died May 1, 1891. They are 
buried in the Thomas Hardy Family Cemetery. 

The committee of lodge brethren drawing the resolutions was composed of George Wright, John 

Estes and J, J. T alley. 

Better Times 

Times looked better at the beginning of 1889, according to Dr, W- P. Gaffney, who was quoted in 
"Local Leaflets," a personal column of the LaGrange Reporter for February 7, 1889. "The people around 
Troup Factory have paid their debts and are in good condition financially. They are mostly small 
farmers who live at home." 

The editor commented "We are glad to hear that prosperity is to be found in some sections of the 
county. May it come to all this year," 

Ransom Bros. & Freeman, of Troup Factory, advertised they were "special agents for the German 
Compound remedies," along with other medicines, groceries and general merchandise. 

John Lemuel Robertson 

In the Reporter for October 24, 1889 there was a notice quoted from the Greenville Meriweth- 
er Vindicator that "there is a prospect of Col. J. L. Robertson, president of Troup Factory, moving to 
Greenville. This reporter has fathomed the rumor and found it not very deep. Col. Robertson has no 
intention of moving to Greenville — not for the present, at least. LaGrange could illy spare him," 

[343] 





JOHN LEMUEL ROBERTSON (T8-19-19U3) 
Prcvidenl of Troup Factory. From a photograph 
by Moors $? Stephenson, Atlanta, Ga. 



MRS. JOJLV LEMUEL ROBERTSON (I852-I92S) 
Nee Mary Harm, daughter of Congressman Henry 
it Hanix. Photographed at the wedding of her 
daughter, Leonora Frances Robertson, to George 
Samuel Foster, on December % 1914, 



Mr. Robertson was a respected citizen of Troup and Meriwether counties. 

On a sheet of Troup Factory stationery, bearing his name as president, and the legend "Manu- 
iacturers of Sheetings, Shirtings, Drills, etc.,' 1 Mr. Robertson dated a memorandum June 26, 1836 and 
penned: 

As I write the date June 26th I am reminded that I am in the presence of another recur- 
ring birthday; and as the figures 37 are registered I realize that the largest part of my journey 
has been traveled. 

Behind me are the flowers, the singing birds and dreamy aspirations of childhood and 
youth; before me are weary miles, rugged steeps, turbid waters and a blazing sun. 

I pause a moment and turn my eyes to the rear and how they fill with tears as I think 
of my boyhood days, my young manhood, my old home, my old father and mother, but the 
end of that way is the cradle. My spirit speaks the answer unbidden: There's no rest there! 

1 turn my eyes in the oilier direction, the way is unmarked, but over the peaks I catch 
the track as it leads to the grave. Does my heart quake and my limbs tremble as I see the 
destination of the body after the conflict is over and the day is spent? Nay— nay. 

My immortal spirit reads upon the horizon, all aglow with heavenly light, 1 am the re- 
surrection and the life.' With hope in my heart and faith in God I take up my journey again 
and press on, not to the grave but to Life Eternal 

Two years later, on June 26, 1338 John Lemuel Robertson wrote again a page of "Birthday 
Thoughts" on Troup Factory stationery: 

And still the great clock of Time registers for me another birthday anniversary. By God's 
grace I have been spared 39 years in this world, 

No bitter sorrow has clouded my life. My heavenly Father has been good to me. Only one 
shadow has come over me — when we buried my noble hearted father, but his last dying words 
remain with me to comfort me and to cheer me on. 



[344] 



Still my heart responds to questionings, that however dead the past is, it longs for a future 
life. Another truth has dawned upon me, which is full of life, activity and joy, like the morn- 
ing, and that is that Christ, my Savior, who is 'the resurrection and. the life," said also 'I am the 
way.' 

The way then to the grave, which travels through the unknown future, is no longer dark and 
unseen but shines out clear and distinct if I follow Him and live by faith in Christ. 

Oh Father, help me to learn this simple yet grandest of truth! 

In his scrapbook, John Lemuel Robertson pasted copies of his published religious articles, obitu- 
aries of friends and relatives written by him and clippings of letters he wrote to the editors of local 
papers during the 1880's and 1890's. 

He felt keenly for "Prohibition," and wrote occasionally on that subject. Once, prior to "Our City 
Election" in LaGrange, he warned the people against a slate of "anti-prohibitionists.' 1 

A long letter, headed "Building Wisely, 1 ' contained "Sage Suggestions to Citizens and City Fathers," 
as they planned for the LaGrange of the future. "That LaGrange will be a city of importance, none of 
us doubts," he wrote on November 20, 1&90. "Every business plan we have . . . private or public, 
ought if possible to be planned as for a city of 10,000 to 20,000 inhabitants. Where the people are to 
come from, what they will do when they come, and how long we shall have to wait for them, is not 
the question. They will come from all quarters, and will find employment, and I fear will be here 
before we are ready to receive them" 

Three things are needed to prepare us for the vast army of newcomers who are already 
knocking at our gates — waterworks, public schools and new homes. 

, , . New homes will require the opening of new streets, and important improvements of 
this sort are now in co rile m pi at ion . . . the work is important since it affects the present and 
future of our city, and it should be done systematically, uniformly and after some plan. 

All new cities engage the services of, and all old cities employ regularly, a thoroughly com- 
petent engineer to take charge of such improvements. Now then, we ought to employ an expert, 
one with experience and rank, and let him lay off the future city into streets after the model 
of the best approved modern cities, but harmonizing the plan as much as possible with the original 
plan of the city. 

. . , Our city is located on a cluster of commanding hills, with some of the loveliest land- 
scapes and most charming views that can be found, and why should we not add to this natural 
beauty by adopting one of the best approved and most handsome plans that modern times furn- 
ish? Anything short of this will be a botch and a blot 

Let a careful map of this survey be made that will show the fills and excavations of every 
street, the width of every main and cross street, the size or depth of every block, and lay 
down the whole system of sewerage, both trunk and confluent, required for a dense popu- 
lation within such limits. 

The wisdom of the plan is patent and its advantages will be incalculable. Then when new 
streets are opened, they will be in conformity with the survey and map and the width, grading 
and site of grounds will all be regulated after the model and not after the crude ideas of an 
official, nor the preferences of an owner. 

Drawing on his years of residence at Troup Factory and experience there, Mr. Robertson wrote 
that "The cotton mill builder, before he ever buys a brick, a stick of timber, or piece of machinery, 
has his plans all carefully matured — floor space, size, height, thickness of walls and every piece of 
lumber settled and every specification for every machine, in every particular from top to bottom, is 
known and laid down. A common carpenter takes the the same precaution, and in fact, success demands 
that it shall be done in every undertaking. Therefore, a city that builds to please and to endure must 
employ like methods," 

Mr. Robertson, a reader of The Atlanta Constitution "for many years," wrote the editors on August 
10, 1887 to express his thanks for the paper's "square out, manly articles against 'pistol toters,' and . , . 
that you intend to urge upon the present legislature and continue in the work, when begun, the 
elevation of the crime of pistol toting into felony." He said: 

The man who carries a pistol habitually is a menace to the peace of society and is an em- 
bryonic outlaw and already has committed homicide in his heart, 

Mr. Robertson took an active interest in Troup and Meriwether County politics. In one of his 
letters, "A Plea for Harmony," he advised against a "mass meeting to put out Independent candi- 
dates" to oppose those already elected in primaries and by delegates meeting in Democratic con- 
vention. 

[345] 



- 






When his father-in-law, Congressman Henry R, Harris, was serving as Third Assistant Postmaster 
General, he wrote that Mr. Harris "was not in the race" again for Congress, as some sources alleged 
If Col. Harris was a candidate, he would so announce himself. His life, character and whole na- 
ture are opposed to dissimulation and sharp practice. Besides, he has never yet betrayed a friend 
and what is more remarkable, he has never punished an enemy. 

He could not be ignorant, however, of the hold he has on the people of his old district, and 
if he had desired to 'win the prize/ being fleeter of foot than any of his friends, he would 
have entered the race himself. 

... I would like to see the custom restored for the candidates to meet on the hustings and 
discuss the questions of the day before the people. This plan is both educative to the masses 
and elevating to the manners and morale of the parties, because men will not say in public 
speech what they will oftentimes publish under under a nom de plume. 

Mr. Robertson wrote the obituary of an employee of Troup Factory when his friend, B. A. Hearn, 
"died at his home at Troup Factory a triumphant death on February 4, 1891, age 58 years." 

Having worked in our cotton mill for 30 years, uninterruptedly, he was well known to the 
writer. He held the position of boss-carder for years, a responsible, difficult and important plate. 
He had all the while retained the confidence and esteem of his employers. With the highest re- 
spect for him and a tender admiration for his virtues, I bring this tribute, more for the sake of 
the living than the dead. 

Occupying an humble place, as men think, he filled his station modestly and meekly, but 
fully and successfully, and his example is worthy of emulation. He was one man that magni- 
fied his work; was patient in its prosecution and faithful in its discharge. His employers' interest 
and his own were one; he knew no difference. 

With those under him he was patient, considerate and very kind. He made them feel that 
he was their friend and they loved him and obeyed him. As he moved about his work, he was 
so quiet, so self-possessed, so attentive and so firm. 

"As a representative of a class/' Mr Robertson wrote, "his character and his life were remark- 
able, and looked at and studied in that sense, he becomes more than the modest, true-hearted man that 
he was. He was a model among his associates. Faithful to his superiors, gentle and just to his subordi- 
nates, earnest in his life work, and true to his God, he exemplified a noble manhood. 

"Such a life as this shines out a beautiful light over the vocation that he followed, and, not con- 
fined there, its soft and mellow rays reach and radiate every lowly walk and humble home." 
God sees better than we. To us it seems that a life like this should be spared to the world. 
But Christ's words are, 'Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone 
but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.* 

A Sad Accident 

The Troup Factory community was grieved by a "sad accident" occurring on October 29, 1890. 
Mr. Jeff Hart, a well digger, was made sick by gas while being drawn from a well. He lost hi hold 
on the rope and fell head downward to the bottom. "A worthy man lost his life," and the "sad- 
dest feature," according to the LaGrtmge Reporter for November 7, 1890 "is that he leaves a large 
family who were dependent on his labor for their support , . . God will surely so order it that 
the orphans shall not suffer." 

Troup Factory Bonds 

A notice appeared in the Reporter for January 16, 1890 concerning "Troup Factory Bonds." The 
company had issued twenty-four $500. bonds bearing interest at seven percent, "payable on the first 
days of May and November at the office of President J. L. Robertson, in LaGrange." 

The total amount, $12,000., was secured by a first mortgage on the buildings, machinery and lands 
of the corporation. A lien on the fire insurance carried on the mill buildings and plant "further forti- 
fied" the bond issue. To make the transaction "good beyond p era d venture," it was stated that a deed 
of trust had been executed to B, G. Swanson, S. P. Smith and Dr. F. M, Ridley covering the entire 
property. 

"The money will be used to make improvements," the notice concluded. 

Prosperous in 1890 

Troup Factory stockholders met in LaGrange on May 13, 1390. A semi-annual dividend of 4% was 
declared. The LaGrange Reporter, in an article on Friday, May 23, 1390 said that "Troup Factory is in a 
very prosperous condition. . . The mill is now well equipped with new machinery which has proved 

[346] 



to be a profitable investment, for ever since it was put in the factory has been making money. It 
now has a surplus of both cash and cotton on hand.' 1 

Pres. Robertson and his board deserve much credit for their able and careful management 
of the affairs of the corporation, A few years ago the factory was quite run down, the ma- 
chinery worn out, and the stock below par. 

Today, no manufacturing enterprise of the same proportion in the State is doing better, or has 
a brighter outlook, 

J. M. C Robertson's Will 

President Robertson's father, James Madison Creed Robertson, of Meriwether County t died October 
13, 1886. His last will and testament was made on September 4, 1379. 

Under the will, bequests of Troup Factory stock were made to his family in the amount of 
$5,000. to Mary Eliza Robertson; §1,600. to John Lemuel Robertson; $2,000, to J. M. C. Robertson, Jr., 
and the remainder to his wife, Mrs. Mary Kendall Robertson, for her natural life, then to be di- 
vided among their children at her death. 

Concerned for the financial stability of the Troup Factory enterprise after his death, James Madi- 
son Creed Robertson specified in Item 10th: 

It is my desire and I so direct that the Factory shall not be crippled or embarrassed by the 
payment of the specific legacies charged upon it or the payment of any dividends until the 
debts now against it shall have been all discharged and the same shall be entirely free from debt. 

In the meantime. I desire that my interest in Troup Factory shall be under the control and 
management of my son, John L. Robertson, in conjunction with the surviving partner, Thomas 
Leslie. 

I desire that my son aforesaid shall act in concert with my old partner, in whose integrity and 
ability I have reposed the utmost confidence for over forty years. 

A Sale of Stock 

In 1891, "money needed to open business on," brought into market for sale 32 shares of Troup 
Factory stock, to be sold "privately or at public outcry before court house door in LaGrange on first 
Tuesday in June next [1891] during the usual sale hours." 

John Lemuel Robertson, in connection with the stock offering, gave some facts about Troup Fac- 
tory operations since the installation in 1886 of the new looms and spinning to produce sheetings. 

The new sheetings mill started up in September, 1886. Troup Factory plant was valued then at 
$36,265. The expenditures for machinery and installation had left it "with no commercial capital, 5 ' so 

$6,000. in cash were borrowed to begin operations. 

In the "four years and eight months since its reorganization," the mill paid out $8,568. in dividends. 
"Assets and valuable improvements" were added to the plant in amount "over $10,000." 

Mr. Robertson pointed out that this represented a total earnings of $1 8,568., "which is 51 per cent 

on the actual capital invested." 

In other words, starting with a nominal capita! stock of $47,600., with only $3(5,265, paid in, 
the mill has paid out to stockholders $8,568. and brought the stock up in real value to nearly 
par. 

Admitting that "In 1890 and '91 the mill has not done well," he stated "the circumstances were 
anomalous and will not recur. High price cotton bought before the decline, cloth price declining and 
dipping lower than at any time before, a freshet [flood waters on Flat Shoals Creek causing a shutdown] 
and a scant turnout [production]," were unfavorable factors named by President Robertson. 

"While the first three might occur again, the latter serious default is now remedied altogether by 
the putting in of more spindles. 

"These facts afford a purchaser every assurance that the stock will be dividend paying in the fu- 
ture. Besides^ the mill now possesses a full quota of machinery in every department, which it has not 
had in the past, and is making nice, sightly goods that are well known and well esteemed in the 
markets." 

Christmas at Troup Factory 

For years, it was the custom for the Troup Factory management to distribute Christmas gifts to the 
employees during the holiday season. On Christmas morning, 1891, the "girls of the mill** gathered 
at Troup Factory to receive C. V. Truitt, the new president, and Charles H. Griffin, secretary of 
the company. 

[347] 



~r 



Mr, Griffin did not arrive for some reason and before the large box brought by Mr. Truitt was 
opened, the girls wanted to know if Mr. Griffin was in the box. Mr. Truitt responded by saying, "No, 
but his compliments were!" 

The Troup Factory correspondent writing about the occasion in the LaGrange Reporter for Jan- 
uary 8, 1892 said, "We will return them by sending our many thanks for his nice present and wish 
our President and Secretary a Happy New Year." 

Mr. Griffin was very popular with the Troup Factory people. He was secretary and manager in 
1892, later president and treasurer. At Christmas, 1892 he was presented a pair of "solid gold cuff but- 
tons" by the employees. In the vernacular of the times, they noted he "sported" them dailv as he wore 
them in his shirt cuffs. 

That Christmas the operatives received from the president and directors "generous Christmas pres- 
ents." In addition. Dr. Elisha D. Pitman (1825-1895), of LaGrange, well known physician, state leg- 
islator, 1875-1876, and mayor of the city 1889-90, "contributed a box of oranges from his Florida grove," 
according to the correspondent in the Reporter for January 6, 1893. 

Waste Room Fire 

On October 10, 1392 a Troup Factory employee was packing waste in the Waste Room when 
there was a sudden fire. The man's clothes were partially burned and "his hat lost" he got out of the 
way so fast! The Troup Factory correspondent who wrote about the fire, which destroyed the build- 
ing near the main factory, said the cause "must have been a match and a mouse, or spontaneous com- 
bustion," 

A waste baling press was destroyed worth $10.00 and waste, $25.00. The small building was valued 

at about S65.00. There was no insurance. 

Textile Directory Listings 

Dockham's Textile Directory for 1897 showed that Troup Factory [the new corporation] was in- 
corporated 1831, with capital of $47,600. Charles H. Griffin was president and treasurer, Robert S, 
White was superintendent. 

Sheetings, shirtings and drills were produced on 52 looms and 1,600 ring spindles, water powered. 
Haynes & Bishop, New York, were selling agents for Troup Factory. 

The reference to "ring" spindles is significant, and to the interested meant that the factory was up- 
to-date in its spinning room. Ring spinning was invented in 1838, and it is possible some was installed 
before the Civil War or soon afterwards when improvements in the machinery at Troup Factory were 
made. 

On the old-fashioned "mule" spinning, with which at least a part of Troup Factory was equipped 
for many years, threads were drafted, twisted and wound on cops in an intermittent action. 

In ring spinning, providing a continuous spinning, a roving passed from an upright creel be- 
tween draft rolls, through a yarn guide and downward to pass through a traveler rotating at high 
speed on the spinning ring, giving twist to the yarn. The ring is traversed m a vertical direction. A 
bobbin fitted on the spindle revolves with it and fills with yarn until the proper size "package" is 
reached. 

Spinning rings are held in holders fitted into circular holes spaced evenly along a metal frame. 
Band or tape drive spindles are centered to be concentric with holes in the frame, the ring holders 
and rings. Spinning frames can be quite long and have duplicate sides. The diameter of ring is com- 
monly about 1% to 3 inches. 

The "mule" was a most important early improvement in spinning, increasing production as never 
before. The great advantage of ring spinning was that drafting, twisting and winding onto the bob- 
bin were carried on simultaneously. It was a simpler and less expensive machine to buy and to operate. 
Continuous spinning made it more productive and in time ring spinning superseded the "mule." 

When the weave room at Troup Factory was equipped with 52 new Lowell 36" looms in 1886 
new ring spinning was installed in the spinning room. 

The re.tr/fe Manufacturers Directory for 1897-93 gave the same capitalization as in Dockham's and 
named Mr. Griffin and Mr. White in their previous positions. In addition to the 52 looms and 1,600 
spindles, 14 cards were listed. Yarns were made in size 12's and I4's. 

A boiler had been installed for some steam power. One water wheel [a Keffel wheel] was listed. 

Haines & Bishop, New York, were the selling agents. 



[348] 



Dockhain's Textile Directory for 1899 carried much the same information as before but specified the 
width of the 52 looms as 36 inches, water power driven, Haines & Bishop still represented Troup Fac- 
tory as selling agents, 

A Victim of Panic 

In September, 1896 Troup Factory sheeting, heavy "AA" grade or quality, was advertised at price 
of 50 per yard, for goods 36 inches wide. This offering was made by Heyman, Merz & Company, fa- 
mous department store of West Point, Georgia, serving a large area of Western Georgia and East 
Alabama since antebellum days. 

At the dry goods store of E, PL Bradfield in LaGrange, Troup Factory sheetings sold at 4< per yard. 

Practically, the goods were given away to move them from the factory. There was no money in 
it for Troup Factory any more! 

The Panic of 1893 paralyzed much of the commerce of the nation as the second administration of 
President Grover Cleveland began, setting off a period of financial and business depression lasting 
about four years. Bankruptcies and failures were widespread. Farm prices declined in an aura of agri- 
cultural bleakness. 

Troup Factory failed. The receivers, Charles H. Griffin and S. H. Truitt, advertised "Troup Fac- 
tory Property F'or Sale" in the LaGrange Reporter for October 7, 1898. 

Judge Sampson W. Harris, of the Coweta Circuit, ordered the receivers of Troup Factory Corp- 
oration, who were also vested with authority of the stockholders and directors, to sell the property at 
public outcry before the courthouse door in LaGrange, the first Tuesday in November, 1898. 

Troup Factory property consisted of: 

1 — Four Story Cotton Mill Building with Picker Room (a rock building) detached 
1 — Storage House 
1 — Cotton Warehouse 

1 — Rock Store House (Troup Factory Store) 
1 — Two Story Grist Mill 
930 — Acres of Land, more or less, a portion of which was in cultivation. 

Also included were "ample tenant houses for operatives." The cotton manufactory was complete 
with machinery for manufacturing sheetings, shirtings, drills and Osnaburgs. Water power was pro- 
duced from Flat Shoals Creek, the mill having a rock dam, "new Keffel Wheel, Water House,' 1 

Title to the Troup Factory property was to be confirmed by Judge Harris at or during the 
November term of Troup County Superior Court, convening on the first Monday in November, 1893. The 
legal advertisement for the sale was dated September 30, 1898. 

As November approached, smallpox was "prevalent" in the northern portion of Troup County, and 
on November 11 it was announced that Superior Court was postponed until the second Monday in Jan- 
uary, 1899. The sale of the Troup Factory property was to be held on the first Tuesday in January, 
1899 by the receivers. 

Ten Cents and a Sate 

The LaGrange Reporter headlined its article about the sale in the issue of Friday, January 27, 1899 
with the startling words: "10 Cents Settles It. Mr. L. M. Park Buys Troup Factory by Raising a Bid 
of $7500 Ten Cents." 

Mr, L. M, Park purchased Troup Factory on Saturday last by raising a bid of $7500. on the 
property 10 cents. 

Several months ago, the Judge of Troup Superior Court authorized receivers to offer the prop- 
erty for sale, which was done. The sale, however, was to be confirmed by the court before 
the deeds of the property were turned over to the purchaser. 

On the first Tuesday in January [1399] the factory was sold at public outcry, Mr. Park bidding 
$6000. for it. In the meantime, before the papers were presented to the judge for his signa- 
ture, a private bid was made of $7500,, which bid was about to be confirmed when Mr. Park ob- 
jected on the ground that he had purchased the factory at the public sale and insisted that the 
property was his. 

The court, however, explained to Mr. Park that the sale was subject to the confirmation of the 
court, and in order to protect the stockholders, it would confirm the sale at $7500., assur- 
ing Mr. Park that if he would raise that bid the deeds would be turned over to him. 

Mr. Park was given a few minutes for consideration and afterwards offered the court $7500. 
and 10 cents, which was accepted. 
The article concluded by stating "Mr. Park will continue to run the factory where it stands, for 
the present at least," 

[349] 



^■^MMH 




Lemuel Madison Park 

Lemuel Madison Park, the new owner of Troup Factory, was born October 26, 184& of a family 
prominent in Meriwether and Troup counties and the state. He was the son of John Park (1800-1349), 
and wife, Mrs. Sarah Truly Robertson Park (1805-1882), who moved to Greenville, Meriwether County, 
from LaGrange about 1344. He had been president of LaGrange Female Academy, 1334-42. 

Mr. Park's wife, before her marriage was Adelaide Bigham, born January 3, 1855 and died June 
13, 1893. She was the daughter of Judge Benjamin H. Bigham, born June 7, 1828 and wife, Mrs. 
Mary Jane Harris Bigham, born November 11, 1832. 

Judge Bigham was state legislator from Troup County 1857-64, and judge of the Troup County 
Superior Court, 1864-65. He died December 29, 1892 and Mrs. Bigham died December 1&, 1910. 

Moving swiftly and with characteristic business acumen, Mr. Park set up an office in LaGrange 
for his new enterprise, which he named Park Mills, 

He wrote on February 14, 1399 to his son, Howard Pope Park, then in college, but later a noted 
personality of the textile world, on the new letterhead of Park Mills. After dating his letter and ad- 
dressing "My dear Howard," his first question was "How do you like the above heading? Or do you 
like the annexed sheet's heading better?" 

The Park Mills letterhead was size approximately 6x9^ inches, printed in a pleasing but rather 
old-fashioned variety of type faces. In an arched arrangement were the words "This Factory Was 
Established in 1843" with the following underneath; 

Oldest in Western Georgia 

PARK MILLS 
(Formerly Troup Factory) 
L. M. Park, President 
LaGrange, Ga. h ._.. . 189... 

In the upper left corner, surrounded with a line representing a cloth sample cut by pinking shears, 
were the vertically arranged words. "Manufacturers of Sheetings, Shirtings, Drills, Osnaburgs, 8 oz! 
Duck, Cotton Yarns, Carpet Warp, Cotton Batting, " These products were separated by a double ruled 
line from other Park Mills activities, the making of "Water Ground Meal" and "Troup County Flour." 

Another letterhead, page 3 of Mr. Park's letter, was like this: 

This Factory was Established in 1843. 
Oldest in Western Georgia 
, . Office of . . 
TROUP FACTORY 
, . And . . 
PARK MILLS 
L. M. Park, President- 
Latest Improved Cotton Ginnery in this Section 

LaGrange, Ga., 189... 

The list of products was the same as in the preceding letterhead- 
Mr. Park wrote that "After getting these two sample heads set up, (I have only had twelve of 
each struck off), I have decided to have headings on 'typewriter' paper and guess I shall have to put 
it thus, as the paper will have to be wider [about 8Vfe x 11 inches ] .*' The arrangement for heading 
on the wider paper was sketched in the letter: 

TROUP FACTORY 
&c &c 

L. M. Park Manufacturers 

& Sons: & c 

H. P. Park as on the 

H. B. Park left uppGr 

& c corner 

&c 

"What do you say to this?" Mr. Park asked. "I hope we will be able in two or three years to 
move the plant to LaGrange, and then I would much prefer the using of the above [Park Mills! 
head." 

Mr. Park mentioned in his letter that "I believe it is universally conceded this is the coldest 
spell of weather ever known in this section. It was 10 degrees below zero by Dr. [Henry Hamilton] 
Cary's U. S. Government thermometer." 

Owner and operator of Park Hotel in LaGrange, and interested in other enterprises, he said, 
"And to make matters worse, the cold spell has been such a long, continued one. It is thought there 



[350] 



will be no fruit at all. So glad I did not go to the expense of rebuddin^ our Florida orange grove, as they 
[the groves generally] are all killed again, the papers say." 

Floods at Troup Factory 

Following the hard winter of 1898-99, there was a serious flooding of the Flat Shoals Creek in 
February, 1900. The LaGrange Reporter stated on February 16, 1900 that "High water is doing consid- 
erable damage at Troup Factory. The first floor is flooded. Water is nine feet higher than ever known. 
Considerable loss to owner." 

The first floor of the Troup Factory was a shipping and packing operation, with some storage and 
machinery. It was reported that this floor was "completely submerged, a lot of machinery and sev- 
eral thousand yards of sheeting being under water. The new engine [for steam power] which was 
recently put in position, is completely under water. The loss to Mr. L. M, Park, who owns the 
factory, will be considerable." 

Weather for the next year or so continued to plague the Troup Factory-Park Mills venture. On 
March 7, 1902 the LaGrange Reporter headlined an article "Troup Factory Wet/' and "Mr. Park Has Some 
Lively Experiences with Floods and Appreciates His Neighbors." 

Our special reporter has just had an interview with Mr. L. M. Park. He has been waterbound 
on the other side [east side from LaGvangel of Flat Shoals Creek, 
The paper noted that "Perhaps the longest and most expensive bridge in the county spans the 
creek at Troup Factory." It was a wooden, covered bridge and the ''unprecedented flood" of Febru- 
ary 27, 1902 washed it away. During the high water, a total of 921 feet of covered bridges were swept 
away by the floods, it was reported, including Troup Factory's, Perry's, Alford's and O'NeaTs. 

A mill dam built by James O. Perry near Troup Factory in 1886 was wrecked. Allen Davidson's 
mill on Turkey Creek was ruined and the dam washed away. There was similar damage throughout 
the Troup County area. 

Mr, Park spoke of it all as "It has been slightly moist down our way," Since his ownership of 
Troup Factory, he had experienced "eight or nine" floods. He was frank to say that he had had 
"water enough, if all had debouched into the mouth of Sheol [hell], to put the fires entirely out!" 
The reporter said "He tells a good joke gotten off accidentally by one of his neighbors." The 
neighbor learned that the bridge across Flat Shoals Creek, totally wrecked except for a few strag- 
gling heavy timbers clinging to the rock piers, could be crossed by "foot passers" after the high 
water subsided, but at peril of falling into the swift waters. He said to Mr. Park, "Well, Mr. Park, 
the Lord does some good things, don't He?" Immediately seeing he had "slipped his trolley," the new 
turn of the century expression for the old "put his foot in it," he tried in vain to rectify by say- 
ing, "Oh, He does a great many good things." 

It is refreshing to hear Mr. Park tell of how noble Mr. Billy Young sent two of his hands, 
Dr. Hardy two, and Col. Traylor six, and the last has come and spent a day in helping him out 
of the miserable slush caused by the flood. He says country people arc the cleverest on earth 
[colloquially, most good-natured, most neighborly] and those mentioned head the list 

Among other news items, he tells, is Mr. Blue Hardy had the end of his barn knocked out 
by lightning, but strange to relate was not set on fire. Although it struck in a few feet of a bed 
of hogs, not one was hit nor a single mule hurt. 

Troup Factory Moved to La Grange 

The flood of 1902 was a turning point in the destiny of Troup Factory. The Park interests deter- 
mined to go ahead with their plans for moving the factory to LaGrange. It was announced in the 
LaGrange Reporter for September 5, 1902: "Park Mills Coming. The Troup Factory Being Moved to 
LaGrange." 

LaGrange's fourth cotton factory is to be put up in a short time. It was stated in the 
Reporter last week that Troup Factory would likely come to LaGrange, although the owners had 
several other points under consideration. 

Ground is being broken for the foundations of the cotton mill, which will be located in 
the Longley pasture in front of the residence of Mr. R. P, Abraham. The machinery is being 
hauled to LaGrange as fast as possible. 

Thus LaGrange grows. It is a coming city. The Reporter welcomes this new manufactur- 
ing plant and its promoters to LaGrange and wishes them every success. 

At this time, the three other "cotton factories" of LaGrange were LaGrange Mills, built 1888; 
Dixie Cotton Mills, incorporated 1895, and Unity Mills, built 1900. 

[-351] 




While the Park family operated the Troup Factory they lived for two or three years in the old 
home of Thomas Leslie. When the factory was dismantled, they moved to LaGrange, 

A Tribute to the Confederacy 

Mr. Park, ever an outstanding and colorful Troup County citizen, made a notable and exciting 
contribution to the LaGrange Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, in 1902. The Georgia 
convention of the Daughters was held in LaGrange that year. 

The LaGrange Graphic stated on October 28, 1902 that "Lemuel M. Park gives $100.00 Toward the 
Confederate Monument to be Unveiled Thursday," 

Much effort of the U. D. C. organisation went into the solicitation of funds in the South and the 
erection of monuments to the valor of the Confederacy and to the honor of the aging Confederate 
Veterans. Nearly every town or city at one time had a marble or granite commemorative shaft or 
pedestal with a sculptured soldier atop it, with appropriate inscriptions. 

The LaGrange Chapter had experienced difficulty in raising enough funds. Mr. Park, a fast mov- 
ing and determined man, sent them word he would give the ladies $25,00 if they would build the 
monument, "even if the shaft was put in a swamp, but $100.00 if they would build it on the court 
house square/* The monument was unveiled on the square during the convention! 

Park Mills 

Park Mills, successors to Troup factory, were listed in Dockham's Textile Directory for 1901 The 
officials named were L. M. Park, President, H, P. Park, Secretary, Edwin Lang, General Manager 
and Buyer, and William Houston, Superintendent, 

The 52, 36 inch looms and 1,600 ring spindles of old Troup Factory operated again, with water 
power from Flat Shoals Creek and steam power from the boiler. Products were duck, sheetings shirt- 
ings and drills. Yarns were offered in sizes 6's to 20's, single and plied. 

James Freeman Brown Company, New York, were selling agents for Park Mills, 
A similar listing was in the American Textile Directory for 1901-02, except that the 14 cards, one 
water wheel and one boiler were added. 

The American Textile Directory for 1902-03 gives about the same information on "Park Mills 
(Troup Factory) L. M. Park & Sons." Edwin Lang was then manager of the mill. 

Park Cotton Mills, Inc. 

An application and petition for charter of a new corporation, Park Cotton Mills, Inc was made 
on October 9, 1902 in the name of Howard P. Park and Henry B. Park, for 20 years. The object of 
the Park Cotton Mills was to "manufacture and finish, dye any goods of cotton or other fibrous ma- 
terial" The capital stock, all paid in, was $20,000. Walter G. Park was attorney for the petitioners. 

The work of constructing the mill building began in the summer of 1902 and by December was 
"progressing rapidly" at the site near the conjunction of Hill and Greenville streets, LaGrange. It was 
expected that the mill would give employment to a "large number of operatives." 

Machinery and equipment from Troup Factory were hauled to LaGrange on wagons The steep 
hills leading to LaGrange, especially the two high hills up which the road came from the Flat 
Shoals Creek level at the mill site, gave the drivers "fits" and the multi-teamed mules and horses 
a hard task. It was a dramatic trek, the hauling away of an era, not yet forgotten in the Troup Factorv- 
Pleasant Grove community. 

Dockhams Textile Directory for 1911-12 lists Park Cotton Mills, Inc., LaGrange, Georgia incorp- 
orated 1902, Howard P. Park was president and treasurer. The mill operated with steam power No 
dyeing was done. 

A. D. Julliard & Company, a famous Worth Street, New York, textile selling house were selling 
agents for Park Cotton Mills, Inc, The mill operated until about 1925, then went out of business There 
is nothing of the mill at the site now. 

Troup Factory in 1971 

At Troup Factory, in 1971, Flat Shoals Creek rushes through a broken section in the middle of the 
high and still sturdy rock dam. Water power, once used, is abundantly evident and untamed. 

There are ruins of the rock picker room building and a small storage building of rock near the 
east bank of the creek. The walls of these ruins can be seen from the present highway and bridge. 

[352] 



The present bridge across Flat Shoals Creek was built a little farther upstream from the rock 
piers of the former bridge. The old covered bridge spanned the creek from a site nearer the rock 
foundations of the Troup Factory Store on the west side. 

Neighborly people own the lands here and delight in reminiscing about the place. Lemuel Madison 
Park would call them still the "cleverest" on earth! 

Maxey Brooks, James Madison Creed Robertson and Thomas Leslie brought Troup Factory to 
life and usefulness by the side of Flat Shoals Creek. The factory's products became nationally known 
for quality. Troup Factory people put a little of themselves into every yard of cloth! 

Troup Factory is a place of pioneers, not only of the wilderness, but of card, spindle and loom, 



Author's Note: 

In July, 1970, construction began on a "new ultra-modern terry towel Jacquard weaving 
plant" near Troup Factory in the Rough Edge District, Troup County. De&ring Mi Hi ken, Inc., a 
giant in textiles, who bought the former Callaway Mills of LaGrange, is building the plant. 
Textile manufacturing has come back to Troup Factory! 

Troup Factory People 

Operatives and Neighbors 

For at least 55 years, beginning about 1847, in and around the village of Troup Factory, Troup 
County , Georgia lived people in mill houses who perhaps cultivated only a few rows of the commoner 
vegetables for their table Nearly everything else came from the mill commissary or "company store," 

Others worked small farms or patches along with their employment at Troup Factory, a pioneer 
Georgia cotton mill. It was a place to make "hard money," a scarce commodity in an agricultural 
community where often farming was slow, crops poor and outlook for a living not promising. 




TROUP FACTORY OPERATIVES - The little gir! third from the left is Catherine McGce. White, 
daughter of Superintendent Robert Southwell White, She teat told not to come down to the mitt thai 
day but ''ran aicm/' from home to be in the picture* Her indulgent father, Mr, White, is identified bij 
his vest and heavy icatch chain. From a photograph of Southern - Views, Corlcss Collection, ami 
courtesy of Hugh Campbell, LaGraiiua, C(t. 

[353] 




Troup Factory people, operatives, friends and neighbors, perhaps did the best they could for the 
times and opportunities coming their way. A remarkably stable labor population, children grew up, 
married and lived out their lives with loyalty to the factory management. 

The people of Troup Factory were almost exclusively of Caucasian stock, from the hills and farms 
of Troup County, Meriwether County, other counties of Georgia and states of the Southeast and East 

Cottages were built by the Troup Factory management on its property and rented to the operatives 
Mill village houses clustered on a hillside facing Flat Shoals Creek to the west The factory on the 
creek bank was four stories high. In its cupola, a bell called the people to work, rang out "dinner 
time" and quitting time. The George Industrial Census of 1876 stated that 100 operatives were em- 
ployed in the manufacture of Osnaburgs, checks, yarns and other products. The population of Trouo 
Factory was 2o0. 

The Troup Factory Store, or commissary, was a commodious building of rock, containing a va- 
riety of general merchandise for those who did not wish to go ten miles away to LaGrange to trade 
It served not only the Troup Factory people but farmers and planters of Troup and Meriwether coun- 
ties in the area. 

Troup Factory, Georgia was a post office, established in 1347, Thomas Leslie, a partner in Robert- 
son, Leslie & Company, owners and operators of Troup Factory, was the first postmaster The company 
erected a building to be used as a church, and school for the children of the operatives. 

Employment at Troup Factory 
bolstered the life of the people with 
a security better than those with 
their existence tied completely to 
small farm agriculture. As opera- 
tives, neighbors and friends they had 
a tight life of interests making them 
the envy of some and scorn of others. 
Those who possessed the rudimen- 
tary education and advantages of 
typical and scant country schooling 
were fortunate. Men, women and 
children fitted with a creditable ease 
into the demands of a new day — 
factory life next to a farm. 

There are many descendants of 
these unusual and dauntless people, 
the operatives and neighbors of Troup 
Factorv. 

Names listed here are from the 
United States Census of 1850. Num- 
bers preceding the names are the 
numbers assigned by the census tak- 
er, the first indicating "Dwelling 
Houses Numbered in the Order of 
Visitation/' and the second, "Fami- 
lies Numbered in the Order of Visita- 
tion," Usually, the two numbers are 
the same. 

It was necessary for the census 
taker to list the "Name of every per- 
son whose usual place of abode on 
the first day of June, 1850 was in 
this family," by age, sex, color (white, 
black or mulatto), and "Profession, 
occupation or trade of each male 
person over 15 years of age," the 
value of "Real Estate Owned, Place 
of Birth (State, Territory or Coun- 
try)," and other data not extracted. 




ROBERT SOUTHWELL WHITE (1341-1905) 
Superintendent of Troup Factory for many ijwm, Mr. White is re- 
membered by his daughter, Mrs. W. A. Emory s m 'a natural bom 
mechanic" lie posed for this photograph with a wrench in his left 
hand! 



[354] 



All were white with few exceptions, 
betically instead of in order listed by 

TROUP 



The names of the heads of families have been rearranged alpha- 
the census taker. 



FACTORY AND ENVIRONS IN 1850 



53-53 Adams, Hinion 


29 M 


Overseer in ti 


Elizabeth 


34 F 




Mary A, 


4 F 




Nancy A. 


3 F 




Martha A. 


2 F 




Warren T. 


1 M 




30-30 Booker, Leroy 


34 M 


Teacher 


Elizabeth A. 


17 F 




Emma 


9/12 




Marcus, M. B. 


18 


Clerk 


39-39 Boswell, Dempsey 


45 M 


Grosser (sic) 


86-86 Brewer, George 


46 M 


Carpenter 


Penelope 


35 F 




Nathaniel C. 


11 M 




Alfred 


9 M 




Martha E. 


7 F 




Hilliard 


6 M 




Statira 


5 F 




GeoTgia A. 


3 F 




67-67 Brooks, Maxey 


59 M 


Millwright 


Lucy 


39 F 




Emiline 


19 F 




Rodum M. 


17 M 


Millwright 


Robert H. 


15 M 


Farmer 


James M. 


14 M 




Thomas S* 


11 M 




Louisa A. J. 


9 F 




Rebecca A. 


7 F 




Lazarus B. 


8 M 




Babe 


1/12 M 




70-70 Buck, Absalom 


61 M 


Farmer 


Christian 


19 F 




James 


17 M 


Farmer 


John 


13 M 




Louisa 


U F 




Absalom 


10 M 




Clementine 


6 F 




54-54 Buckhanon, E, B- 


22 M 


Factory Hand 


Julia A, 


18 F 




Hill, F. Berry 


16 M 


Factory Hand 


42-42 Crosby, James A. 


23 M 


Supt. Factory 


Martha 


63 F 




Mary 


29 F 




Henry 


4 M 




34-34 Dallis, H. W. 


30 M 


Farmer 


Martha M. 


21 F 




Leslie W, 


2 M 




Infant 


5/12 




Hamner, William 


26 M 


Physician 


Mary 


20 F 




55-55 Darrah, William 


50 M 


Factory Hand 


Nancy 


40 F 




Clementine 


12 F 




Hiram 


9 F 




Saffrona 


6 F 




37-37 Day, William H. 


31 M 


Well Digger 


" Mary E. 


26 F 




" William F. 


7 M 




Thomas J. 


5 M 




" Mary A. 


3 F 





$1,550. 



S12,000. 



$2,000. 



$1,600. 



Ga. 



N.C, 

Ga. 

N.C. 

Ga. 



N.C. 
Ga. 



Fla. 
S.C. 

Ga. 

it 



N.Y. 
Ga. 



N.H. 
Ga. 

ft 

IT 



[355] 




35-35 Earp, Le welly n 
Cristina 
Caleb 
James 
Mary 
Margaret 
" Martha 
Fortner, Franklin 
Eljza 
Jacob 
Frances R. 
Thomas 
Elizabeth 
38-38 Fulghum, Anna 

Thomas 
Martha 
Moses 
John 
Elizabeth 
Peters, Larkey 
64-64 Fuller, Bryant 

Elizabeth 
Washington 
John 
Sarah 
Eliza 
James 
Gxeen 
Jackson 
62-62 Fuller. C. 

Martha 
33-33 Gates, Charles 
Nancy 
Frances 
James 
" William 
69-69 Glanton, Samuel 

Elizabeth 
60-60 Greer, William 
Susan 
Hughes, Fanny 
Simon 
46-46 Griggs Rodum 
Elizabeth 
William 
71-71 Hardy, James 
Ann E, 
John G. 
William 
James 
Tava A. E. 
Thomas 
Eliza 
Martha 
Lewis M r 
Barbara A. 
87-87 Hardy, William A. 
Naomi 
Susan F. 
65-65 Hill, Green 
Frances 
" William 
" Elizabeth 
" Julia A. 
Thomas 
* John 



49 M 


47 F 


21 M 


19 M 


15 F 


14 F 


12 F 


17 M 


12 F 


10 M 


8 F 


4 M 


2 F 


45 F 


S3 M 


21 F 


18 M 


16 M 


5 F 


78 F 


40 M 


55 F 


20 M 


16 M 


16 F 


14 F 


12 M 


10 M 


8 M 


75 M 


50 F 


29 M 


17 F 


2 F 


1 M 


1/2 M 


22 M 


16 F 


71 M 


45 F 


28 F 


65 M 


21 M 


18 F 


5/12 M 


52 M 


41 F 


22 M 


18 M 


15 M 


18 F 


10 M 


7 F 


5 M 


3 M 


1 F 


24 M 


18 F 


1 F 


45 M 


40 F 


20 M 


18 F 


16 F 


14 M 


12 M 



Farmer 
Farmer 



Farmer 



$200. 
$1,800. 



Farmer 
Farmer 

(Mulatto) 
Cabinet Maker 

Farmer 

Tax Collector 

Farmer 

Farmer 



$600. 
$3,000. 



$2,000. 



Farmer 
Farmer 



N,C. 



Ga. 



[356] 



48-48 



57-57 



50-56 



44-44 



51-51 



53-58 



40-40 



41-41 



Hill, John 


62 M 


Farmer 


" Elizabeth 


58 F 




Frances 


38 F 




James 


32 M 


Miller 


" Eliza 


26 F 




" Aaron 


23 M 


Factory Hand 


Martha 


23 F 




" Elijah 


21 M 


Factory Hand 


" Mary A. 


18 F 




Rosa 


B F 




" Wiley 


6 M 




Streeter, Jane 


16 F 




Mahala 


13 F 




James 


12 M 




Emiltne 


10 F 




John 


3 M 




Holley, Edestha 


60 F 




Elizabeth 


36 F 




Silas 


13 M 




Holley, T. J. 


34 M 


Supt. Factory 


Caroline 


25 F 




Thomas P. 


4 M 




Francis 


4 M 




Jones, H. B. 


50 M 


Day Laborer 


Martha 


48 F 




Susanah 


21 F 




Louisa 


19 F 




Elizabeth 


17 F 




James 


16 M 


Factory Hand 


Martha 


15 F 




George W. 


14 M 




Peter 


12 M 




Hiram 


10 M 




Mary 


8 F 




Lydia 


6 F 




Cicero 


2 M 


- 


Thomas 


1 M 




Johnson, Mary 


50 F 




Bersheba 


20 F 




Auguston 


17 M 


Factory Hand 


Catherine 


16 F 




Mary J. 


13 F 




Wright Catherine 


22 F 




Leslie, Thomas 


36 M 


Merchant 


Louisa V. 


34 F 




Catherine 


13 F 




Anderson 


12 M 




Robert 


10 M 




Elizabeth 


8 F 




Sarah 


6 F 




Thomas 


4 M 




Janett 


2 F 




Robertson, S. W. 


29 M 


Clerk 


McKigney, B. 


48 M 


Clerk 


Isabel 


39 F 




Martha R 


19 F 




Elizabeth A r 


17 F 


! 


Mary A, 


15 F 


1 


William 


12 M 




Franklin 


10 M 




Frances P, 


8 F 




Henry M. 


5 M 




Caroline 


a F 




Matlox, John A, 


52 M 




Elizabeth 


46 F 


" 


Sarah 


24 F 





$400. 



Ga. 



Ga, 



S.C. 
Ga. 



$80, 



$2,000. 



N.C. 
Ga. 



S.C. 
Ga. 



S.C, 
Ga. 



tr 
it 

H 



Maryland 
Ga. 



[357] 



Mattox, Lorrena 


19 F 




w 


Martha 


15 F 




/■• 


Frances 


13 F 




" 


Emily 


12 F 




'■" 


Arpsey 


9 F 




" 


Minor! 


7 F 




" 


John 


5 M 




43-43 May berry, L. 


40 M 


Well Digger 


w 


Martha 


48 F 




"■ 


Sarah E. 


17 F 




pp 


William 


H F 




» 


Martha 


13 F 




tr 


Lucinda F, 


11 F 




u 


Solomon P. 


9 M 




36-36 Perry 


Thomas A. 


25 M 


Mechanic 


iH 


Permelia J. 


24 F 




■' 


Julia A, 


3 F 




" 


James O. A. 


1 M 




" 


John T. W. 


6/12 M 




50-50 Filkerton, B. 


65 M 


Farmer 


tt 


Elizabeth 


49 F 




Smith 


, James J. 


19 M 


Factory Hand 




Green W. 


IS M 


Factory Hand 


JJ 


Franklin 


13 M 




Culberson, James 


19 M 


Factory Hand 


Hill, Louisa 


25 F 




" William 


19 M 


Factory Hand 


59-59 Ragland, A. M. 


42 M 


Farmer 


w 


Elizabeth A. 


32 F 




** 


William 


14 M 




rt 


Bernel R r 


3 M 




• ■ 


Delia A. 


4 F 




" 


Sarah 


0/12 




Hanvy 


, Q. N. 


21 


Overseer 


47-47 Roberds, Wiley 


32 M 


Farmer 


rip 


Sarah 


32 F 




■" 


Frances 


11 F 




" 


William P. 


9 M 




tt 


Amanda 


7 F 




" 


George W. 


5 M 






John T. 


i M 




61-61 Scott, 


George L. 


59 M 


Farmer 


88- 88 Sellers 


, H. 


45 M 


Mechanic 


" 


Elizabeth 


25 F 




r- 


Elizabeth 


11 F 




ft 


John 


11 M 




P' 


Jane 


9 F 




>■■ 


William 


5 M 




45-45 Sharp, 


Jesse 


55 M 


Blacksmith 


l* 


Elizabeth 


52 F 




" 


Mary A. 


21 F 




■" 


Mahal a 


20 F 




py 


Martha 


19 F 




6B-68 Sledge, 


E. H. 


34 F 




n 


Rebecca A. 


17 F 




" 


Anne W. 


13 F 


-. . 


* 


John W. 


11 M 




u 


Nathaniel 


10 M 




H 


Robert H, 


8 M 




pj 


Elizabeth M. 


6 F 




" 


Milton M, 


2 M 




Gaylqr 


M. 


27 M 


Overseer 


32-32 Sledge, 


John 


33 M 


Farmer 


pp 


Jane S, 


31 F 





[358] 



31-31 Sledge, 


Miris 


" 


Rebecca 


" 


Susan G. 


" 


Nathaniel M 


Lundy, 


L. A. 


52-52 Smith, 


Lane 


if 


Emeline 


FF 


Sarah E. 


'•• 


Mary J. 


66-66 Thornton , H. 


tt 


Matilda 


" 


Franklin 


Jt 


John 


" 


Diza 


« 


Elizabeth 


" 


Martha 


" 


Josiah 


" 


Charles 


■H 


Sarah J. 


Crosby 


Edmund 


v 


Amanda 


49-49 Welbom, Sarah 


" 


Nancy 


n 


Elizabeth 


,rt 


Martha A. 


'■• 


James 


" 


William 


" 


Cenia 


" 


Eliza 


."H 


Frances 


63-63 Wright, 


John 


rr 


Sarah 


" 


Caroline 


" 


Mourning 


J-" 


Loyd 


.'H 


Tabitha 


.'H 


John 


*' 


McDonald 


IT 


William 


■" 


Jane 


M 


Andrew- 


" 


Sarah 



28 M 



Farmer 



$500. 



G;i. 



30 F 


3 F 


5 M 


20 F 


22 M 


20 F 


3 F 


8/12 


44 M 


m f 


19 M 


15 M 


13 F 


11 F 


9 F 


7 M 


5 M 


3 F 


29 M 


18 F 


48 F 


22 F 


20 F 


19 F 


18 M 


13 M 


7 F 


5 F 


1 F 


41 M 


28 F 


19 F 


17 F 


14 M 


12 F 


10 M 


6 M 


4 M 


2 F 


1 M 


17 F 



Factory Hand 



Millwright 



3300. 



Farmer 
Farmer 



Machinist 



$120. 
S450. 



Factory Hand 



Shoemaker 



s.c. 
Ga. 



S.C. 

Ga. 
N.C. 

Ga, 



N.C. 
Ga. 



a 
** 
a 



S.C. 



The Census of 1860 

In the census of I860, Troup Factory people are listed as "Factory Operatives." The name of 
head of household is given, but the census taker generally Indicated wives, children and other occu- 
pants of the household by first name initials only, with age, sex, color, etc. 

The head of the family, or household, and most of the members are shown as "Factory Opera- 
tives." It was not unusual for children to be employed along with their parents in early cotton 
mill jobs. W. D. Pearce was "Supt. of Factory" at this time. 

Families of Factory Operatives 



766-702 Arp, James 


40 M 


Va. 


Bowles 


F. 


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[359] 






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[360] 











Troup Factory Cemeteries 

Troup Factory 
Troup County, Georgia 

On the east side of Flat Shoals Creek, a Troup Factory Cemetery occupies a hill top site with 
a view to the southeast. It is slightly beyond and behind the village site of Troup Factory, which 
was on the hillside and faced west and northwesterly towards the mill and creek. 

Begun as a burial ground for whites of the community, many Negroes were later buried here. 
The cemetery is very near the old roadbed, on the right, where high banks define this early 
road to Hamilton In Harris County. Paved highway U\ S. 27 parallels the old road for part of the 
distance up the steep incline from the Flat Shoals Bridge. 

Cedars, hollies, hardwoods and pine trees grow in the cemetery. Some of the graves, the ear- 
liest, are covered with rock tombs. These are built up in the pioneer style, but otherwise unmark- 
ed. There are many graves marked only with a rock at head and foot. Only two are now marked 
with monuments: 

ANNIE, In Memory of 

wife of NANCY N. PORTER 

EDMUND DUNCAN born August 10, 1807 

died July 19, 1879 died March 7, 1864 

Aged 82 years. The angels called on 

a summer day. 
Our Mother 

Thompson Family Cemetery 

The Thompson Family Cemetery is on Hipp property, part way up the hill, on the right of the 
highway. A strong rock wall surrounds the cemetery, in which stood, until recent years, an enor- 
mous cedar tree. There are perhaps three or four graves in the enclosure, with only one marked: 
EMELTNE BROOKS Farewell, Mother, a long 

wife of a last, a sad farewell. 

JOHN THOMPSON L(mg and unbroken win be 

this silent slumber. 

n . . Wa # l imu ,aan Spring, with its blooming flowers, 

October the 10th 1830 . . ... .. . 

Alltumn> Wlth lts harvest, 

and died And Winter, with its stormy winds, 

August the 27th 1870 Will come and go 

Aged 39 years, 11 months But still wilt thou sleep. 

St 14 days. Farewell, Mother 

Leslie Family Cemetery 

On Corless property, near and to the left of the highway, and about half way up the hill, is the 
Leslie Family Cemetery. The old road wound up the steep incline and since the highway was laid 
in a straighter route, part of the curve of the old road is on the left side. 

This is the family burying ground laid off by Thomas Leslie, partner with James Madison Creed 
Robertson in the Troup Factory, It is a plot about forty by fifty feet, surrounded by a rock wall. The 
monuments are fallen. Thomas Leslie, Jr., is buried here. 

In Memory of 

THOS. LESLIE, JR. 

born November 12, 1846 

died June 22, 1864 

Many fond hopes lie buried here. 

Our Little 



EVA, 
died January 28, 18G7 

Aged \%Vz months 
A. & V, A. LESLIE 



Our Dear Little 

JULIA, 

9 Years Old 

1872 

Sleep on, sweet one, 

and take thy rest. 

God called thee home, 

He thought it best. 

A. & V. A, LESLIE 



Infant Son of 

L. W. & L. L. DALLIS 

born August 19th 1874 

died September 30th 1874 

The "Infant Son" was the child of Leslie Wellington Dallis and wife, Louisa Leslie Dallis, daughter 

of Thomas Leslie, 

[361] 



- 




OLD PICKET FEi\CE AROUND GRAVE 
The grave itself (s not otherwise marked. 



Eva and Julia Leslie were the daughters of Anderson and Virginia Beid Leslie. The father was a 
merchant at Troup Factory, whose name appears in the 1860 census. He was then aged 22 and his 
wife 13. He was a son of Thomas Leslie and was associated with his father in the Troup Factory gen- 
eral merchandise store. 

Thomas Leslie and his wife, Mrs. Louisa Villiers Anderson Leslie, are buried in the Crowder 
Family Cemetery, at Mark Hall Plantation, Meriwether County, Georgia. 

Troup Factory Cemetery 

What is now known as the Troup Factory Cemetery is on the west side of Flat Shoals Creek 
on a high hill It is about a quarter of a mile to the left off U. S. 27 South, and to the right off the 
unpaved Hardy Road. There is a sign "Troup Factory Cemetery;- at the roadside. 

Some old graves here, containing probably the 
earliest burials at Troup Factory, are surrounded 
by rock walls. Several are covered by box-like 
tombs of rock. Others have locally quarried stone 
slabs, on rock bases, no inscriptions. 

One unknown grave has head and foot mark- 
ers of old, weathered heart pine. Another is sur- 
rounded by the remains of a wooden picket fence, 
very old, and held together by its mortise and tenon 
joints. The grave in this enclosure is unmarked. 
Many graves are marked only with a stone at head 
and foot, as in the Troup Factory Cemetery on the 
east side of Flat Shoals Creek. 

The cemetery is in a grove of cedars, hollies, 
hardwoods and pines. Vinca minor ground cover is 
everywhere, a shiny, green carpet under the trees. 

Graves of the Perry Family 

A very large oak tree shades the graves of Thomas A. and Permelia J, Earp Perry There are two 
monuments, one a marble headstone carrying joint data and the other a lead colored metallic slab 
surmounted by an obelisk, also with data. An unmarked child's grave is near the Perry graves. 

The various inscriptions on the graves of Thomas A. and Permelia J. Earp Perry are as follows- 
PERMELIA J. EARP THOMAS A. PERRY 

born June 10, 1825 bom February 6j m5 

married to married to P. J. EARP 

T. A, PERRY January IS, 1844 

January 18, 1844 died December 29 ia90 

_ died (Masonic Emblem) 

December 6, 1882 We will meet again. 

Aged 57 years, We reinember you still 

5 ™ n ths We loved her, 

° ur Mother Cone to rest 

Thomas A, Perry was 25 years of age in the census of 1850. He was a mechanic at Troup Factory 
He was born in South Carolina, as was his wife, Mrs. Permelia J. Earp Perry. He also operated a tan- 
yard and blacksmith shop. 

Thomas Allen Perry and Permelia Jane Earp were married on January 18 1844 [as inscribed 
on their tombstones], in Floyd County, Georgia, Mr. Perry married (2) Mrs. Martha Ann (Earp) Hee- 
ler, born January 15, 1837. V} 8 

In 1845, the lands of Lewellyn Earp, father of Mrs. Permelia Jane Earp Perry were sold at 
public auction by the sheriff of Floyd County. The place was sold on a fi. fa. on an unsatisfied judg- 
ment against him. The highest bidder paid $150,00. 

Within the next year or so, the Earps and Perrys moved to Troup Factory, Troup County Georgia 
about the time Troup Factory was built. Lewellyn Earp lived next to his son-in-law at Troup Fac- 
tory, as indicated in the 1850 census of Troup County. 

John Thomas Perry (1349-1925), of LaGrange, Georgia was the third son of Thomas Allen and 
Permelia Jane Earp Perry. He married Artemesia Morris (1849-1919), sixth child of the Rev. Ivey 

[362] 






"17 
/ 














TOMRSTOXE OF THOMAS V ITKRY [ i H2.V I SUD) 
Plio(o^,f{i)>hc<i in January, 1969. The tombstone ap- 
pears to have been broken by vandals. Mr. Ferry 
wan a mechanic at Troup Factory in 1850, ami 
later in sawmiUing, col ton ginning, woodworking 
and tamjard operations. 



GRAVE OF MRS, THOMAS A, PERKY (1825-1882) 
Nee Fennel ia ]. Harp, married to Thomas A. Perry 
on January 18, 1844 [the date in re.eordad on Mr. 
Peiri/s tombstone also] . The slab in cant grey ma tat. 
it is -tin mounted by a east grey metal obelisk. An- 
other tombstone in leaning against the obelisk. 



Brittain Morris (1318-1883), and wife, Mrs, Mary Joyce Christian Morris (1814^1862). The Rev. and Mrs. 
Morris are buried at Clapp's Cemetery, near Columbus, Georgia. The Rev. Morris married twice after 
his first wife's death. 

The Rev. Morris was born in Elbert County, Georgia in 1818, and died in Phenix City, Alabama. He 
married Mary Joyce Christian on March 3, 1839 in Meriwether County, Georgia, with the Rev. W. 
D. Mathews officiating. She was born in Madison County, Georgia in 1814 and died in 1862 at Flat Rock, 
Alabama. 

The Rev. Morris was a Methodist minister, a "circuit rider" of the early days of Methodism in 
Georgia and East Alabama. He was the only child of Joseph Morris (1793-1854), of Wilkes County, 
Georgia, and wife, Mrs, Nancy Allgood Morris (1731-1865). 

Descendants of the family of the Rev. Morris still live in Langdale, Chambers County, Alabama. 

P rather Family Plot 

The Prather Family Plot in the Troup Factory Cemetery is surrounded by a modern metal fence. 
The graves are: 

W. G. PRATHER 

born March 25, 1&93 

died July I, 1947 

Gone but Not forgotten 

and 

WILLIAM GRADY PRATHER 

Alabama 

PFC 117 Field Artillery 

31st Div. 

World War I 

died July 1, 1947 



S. H. PRATHER 

born September 19, 1865 

died May 25, 1905 

Thy Will Be Done 



CLEVELAND, 

son of 

S. H, & EMMA PRATHER 

born October 25, 1891 

died October 20, 1897 



TERRELL, 

son of 
H, & EMMA PRATHER 
born October 22, 1903 
died June 8, 1904 



[363] 




Other marked graves in the Troup Factory Cemetery are; 

ROBERT S. WHITE BUNK BORDERS 

„ J? 0t 3,. . 1366-1935 

37 Ga. Militia and 

CSA ' KATE BORDERS 

1872-1912 

h ? °S2 S ' ^ Mt ! T aS thG su P erintendent °* Troup Factory for many years. He was born Novem- 
ber 1, 1841 and died January 11, 1905. 

Perry Family Cemetery 

,, B X°^f the . T Tr ? P FaCt ° ry Cemeter y> a hundred yards or so, the road forks to the right and left 
About half a mile down the right fork, at dead end now, is the site of the old home of Thomas A 
and Permeha J, Earp Perry. Near it is Perry Family Cemetery of James Oliver Perry, their son It 
is surrounded by a rock wall of excellent proportions and workmanship. The several graves here are- 
JAMES OLIVER PERRY THOMAS K 

37 Ga Militia j. 0> & A E PE r ry 

CSA ' born September £6, 1887 

ANNA Eh, died May 6, 1888 

JAMES OLIVER PERRY ,. offj J^^ 
[not marked] born aQd died 

IRB and CLARA WRIGHT March 3, 1885 

[not marked] LILLY p EHHY 

ETTA WRIGHT [not marked] 

[not marked] Child , g graye 

Twm Infants [not marked] 

Inot marked] 

The road here originally led to the Perry Cotton Gin and Grist Mill erected 
Perry on Perry Creek, a half mile or more from the family cemetery. 



by James Oliver 



Traylor-White- Hardy-Thompson House 

Troup Factory 

Troup County, Ga. 

Robert B, Tray lor came from Virginia in the early days of settlement of Troup County He had a 
brother, John N, Traylor, who wrote of him: P county, ne nad a 

I most assuredly had a model brother. Through a long life he was ever my friend a clean 
strong-souled, high-minded man, one of nature's noblemen, a credit to his worthy forbears 

i*i9^ ther br0 ?^ J ° h J?. H ? m P hre y Traylor < 1824 - 19 <"), born in Virginia, came to Troup County in 
1842 and married Mary Elizabeth Bailey (1823-1903), in 1844. She was the daughter of Colonel Charles 
Cabamss Bailey (1790-1864), and wife, Mrs. Martha Hairston Rowland Bailey (173o-1872) 

Colonel Bailey built "Forest Home/' a handsome Greek Revival plantation house, for his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Traylor, in 1851. It is now the Parham home, Rosemont, at Rosemont Com- 
munity near Troup Factory, on U, S, 27. See the author's Pine Log and Creek Revival. 

The home built by Robert B. Traylor at Troup Factory, probably about 1845, was a story and a half 
type. Four main rooms on the first floor had a central hallway with stairs leading to the two upper bed- 
rooms. The kitchen and dining rooms were separated from the house, probably by a dog-trot 

Sills under the Tray lor- White-Hardy Thompson House are about twelve inches square, hand hewn 
They are put together with wooden pegs to hold the mortise and tenon joints. This method is also 
used m the framing of the house. 

In the back yard, the original Traylor smokehouse still stands. The beams from which once hung 
nams and other meats are joined and pegged into upright members of the framing, 

Robert B^ Traylor, builder of the original portion of the Traylor-White-Hardy-Thompson House 

!SS b c T m ^^ C ° Unty ' Virglnia ° n Se P tembe r 1, 1816, He married Celia R. Mullins January 24' 
lyjfl. bhe was born June 2, 1819 and died June 16, 1387. 

Mr, Traylor was a Troup County commissioner for the years 1378-86. He died July 16, 1893. 

[364] 




A son of Mr, and Mrs, Traylor, John C. Traylor, moved to Texas. He later became mayor of 
Dallas. His daughter was married to Judge John C. Robertson of Dallas. 

After the death of Robert B. 
Traylor, his home and farm were 
bought by Robert Southwell White, 
superintendent of the Troup Factory 
on nearby Flat Shoals Creek. Mr. 
White and family then lived in the 
"Superintendents House" the old 
home of Thomas Leslie. James Madi- 
son Creed Robertson, of Meriwether 
County, and Thomas Leslie were 
partners in the Troup Factory. 

Mr. White was very fond of the 
Traylor place. He intended making 
it his later home after retirement 
from Troup Factory. On a hunting 
and fishing trip to Florida in the TRAYLOR- WHITE-HARDV-THOMPSOX HOUSE 

1390*5, he pulled up a small magnolia Original portion of home built htj Robert B. Traylor about IMS, 

tree, a "mere switch," 18 inches long, from a swamp. He brought it back to Troup Factory and plant- 
ed it at the Traylor house. It has grown to great size in the left side yard. 

The Traylor place was rented by Mr. White to others for several years. He continued to im- 
prove the place and planted water oaks and elms along the road to the house. 

Place SoJd to Dr. Hardy 

During the ownership of Lemuel Madison Park, the Troup Factory was dismantled and moved 
to LaGrange in 1902. Mr. White left the community and sold the Traylor place to Dr. John H. Hardy, 
son of Troup County pioneer James D. Hardy (18 19-1 888), whose plantation was a few miles from 
Troup Factory near the present Oak Grove Church. 

Dr. John H. Hardy was born February 22, 1864. He married Antoinette Blalock White, born April 
9, 1869. She was the daughter of Robert Southwell and Martha Lewis Owen White. Mrs. Hardy 
died July 22, 1932. Dr. Hardy died May 11, 1942. Mrs. White was bom October 1, 1841 and died De- 
cember 31, 1935. 

Dr, Hardy's daughter, Annie Louise Hardy, was born here on November 28, 1900. She was mar- 
ried to John Jackson Hogg of Troup County on May 28, 1922. He was killed in an automobile accident 
on December 12, 1935. Mrs, Hogg was married to Horace Clinton Thompson in 1937. This has been their 
home since that time. 

Miss Elizabeth White, Mrs. Thompson's aunt, was born at Troup Factory on August 28, 1374 and 
died March 20, 1951. Her aunt, Catherine McGee White Emory (Mrs. W. A.), is 99 years of age and 
lives at Long Cane community, Troup County. She was also born at Troup Factory, in 1871. 

Mrs. Thompson has a fine leather billfold or 
pocket book of James D. Hardy, well tooled and fea- 
turing a stag motif. Inside, the original owner wrote 
in ink, "James D. Hardy, his book, 1841," It contains 
now only a receipt for Mr. Hardy's 1S61 taxes, 
S66,15, and taxes for J. C. Hardy, minor, for whom 
he was guardian, $9.68 for 1861. Both amounts are 
signed for by Samuel Johnson, Tax Collector of 
Troup County. 

The house was remodeled in 1918 by Dr. and 
Mrs. Hardy to about its present appearance. The 
ceilings were covered in a parquet block pattern oi 
regular four inch flooring, separated by framing, 
an unusual treatment. In recent years, the Thomp- 
sons have paneled the main rooms. 

Across the road from the front of this place there 
was once a church building. Mrs. Hardy*s mother 
told her that people would come to the meetings and 




SMOKEHOUSE 

Front and distinctive overhang of old smokehouse 
at the Traylor -White -Hardy -Thompson House. 
Openings for eseape of smoke can he seen. 



[365] 






SLAVERY TIME CABIN AND HOW IT GREW 
Near the TrayiorAVhita-TTttvtlij-Thmnp-Mti Home. 



so many would go home to dinner with the family 
owning the property that the church was removed. 
Folks were eating the man out of house and home! 
The old timers of Troup Factory used to tell of 
an Indian burying ground near the Thompson place. 
Flat Shoals Creek was a favorite of the Creek Indians 
in this area and their trails crossed hereabouts at 
fords on convenient shoals. 

An old road turns off Hardy Road to the left 
near the house and heads directly towards the creek. 
Originally, it went into the Smoky Road near the 
creek. The road now ends at the site of the old 
Perry house and cemetery where members of this early Troup Factory family are buried The Perrv 
cotton gm and mill ruins are on Perry Creek. y 

The Troup Factory Cemetery is across Hardy Road on the east from the Thompson home 
John Harold Hardy brother of Mrs. Thompson, was born at the home on March 5, 18&9 He was 
a well known warden of Troup County and died on October 8, 1933. He owned the more than 900 acres 
ot land in the Troup Factory enterprise sold by Lemuel Madison Park after the factorv was moved to 
LaGrange, Following Mr. Hardy's death, the land was sold to various owners, among them Charles 
Warren Corless, Jr., who bought lands surrounding the factory site and lives there now in 1971. 

Kate Leslie of Troup Factory 

For five months in 1857 Katherine "Kate" Leslie, eldest daughter of Thomas Leslie, taught school 
at Troup Factory. Her schoolroom was the little Factory Church. 

In a notebook with marbleboard covers she wrote, 25 years later, that she "taught a school of twelve 
and fifteen year old girls and two or three little boys." The teaching was "pliant and profitable » 

After her school dismissed for the summer, she attended a commencement in Madison County Georgia 
while visiting relatives. A highlight of her trip was a visit to the great wonder of Georgia Stone 
Mountain, v-^^ s «* ; uwne 

Katherine Leslie was born in Meriwether County, Georgia on August 22, 1836. Her parents Thomas 
and Lcutsa VUliers Anderson Leslie, were "both raised in Wilkes County, Georgia, but met and formed 
acquaintance and marriage engagement at the Warm Springs in Meriwether Countv where mv fate 
JnoseXf " ^^^ busi * ess >" she wrote. Warm Springs was a favorite summer resort in 

Kate's family moved to Greenville, Meriwether County, in 1838. Her father opened a mercantile 
establishment and began an association with James Madison Creed Robertson lasting a lifetime 

In September, 1848, Thomas Leslie moved his family to Troup Factory, Troup County, Georgia a 

ew miles away on Flat Shoals Creek, He was manager and agent of the Troup Factory cotton mill 

from that time until 1881 and partner with Mr. Robertson and others in Robertson, ££ ^ cfmpa^ 

owners and operators of the factory. ™P m >' 

"Mine has been an eventful We," Kate penned, "now when [I am] little more than forty-six 
years of age.' The year was 1882 and she was then Mrs. Henry Eppes Moss of WhitesvUle Harris 

£M5K£ st ^tt ,ound a "^ deal " sunshine and h « - »* ™™ 
a ndX^v; a f o„zf^^rtS't y ; n ofc»e pIares ' and ™ ,ly -**■ ^ *°° d ™ 

1S4-/ ™vT.T° Ced k'^ 1 °* r SiXth bi " hday ' t0 Mr ' John P «* <" Granville, to 1842 fc. 

Tn,: y ^LT s :^\t n ^\ 1 ^ ™* to ^ » ™» »-* ■-*•* *5£ 

vJt n J£*\ T ™ en ] i° ,' he Greenvill » Academy to >«, Corbin and Bonnell In l8 45 Mr 
essiaSnU. 46, '"" *"* ^ "" "* m ° Vti '° X ™ P < e0ntinued ™** M '- *•* and his different 



[366] 



Leslies Move to Troup Factory 

After the Leslie family moved to Troup Factory, the children went to school to Mr. Lee Booker 
"a few months," in 1849. They walked daily nearly three miles to the school. In 1850, they went 
a month or two to Mr. Fairfax Finch, "at the same school house I had walked to the year before." 

Kate Leslie entered the "Baptist College at La Grange" in July, 1851. It was then known as La- 
Grange Collegiate Seminary for Young Ladies, At the time, Milton E. Bacon was president. She 
wrote that she was "under Milton E. Bacon, Dr. H. H. Tucker, Coleman B. Ferrell and Miss Sarah 
Stephens." The college was dedicated in November, 1851 and commencement held that year in the fall. 

The name of the college was changed on January 14, 1852 to Southern and Western Female Col- 
lege. Kate Leslie was there for the spring term in 1852, She boarded with the Singleton Traywick family 
in 1851 and with Col. Wylie P. Burks' family in 1852, finding "both terms pleasant and improving." 

For the spring term of 1853, Kate Leslie attended the school of Professor John Darby at Culloden, 
Georgia. His assistants were Misses Fannie and Cynthia Burlingame. She boarded with the family of 
Dr, Carey S. LeSeur, and had "a pleasant year of much benefit." 

In April, I854 h I made a pleasant visit to Greenwood, Jackson County, Florida to my Uncle 
[Davis] Gray's, in company with Uncle Felix Leslie, who bought land in that county then, and a 
cousin, Miss Gabriella Anderson, from near Washington [Georgia], 

Visited Mali anna, the county site and the famous Blue Spring and Chipola Cave and Natural 
Bridge, places of note in Jackson County, Spent two months of the summer of same year in 
Wilkes and Greene counties visiting relatives. A very pleasant year indeed. 

1855 and 1856 pleasant, though unmarked particularly. 

After teaching her school at Troup Factory, in 1857, Kate Leslie went to Greenwood, Florida 
in October of that year to spend the winter, "as pleasant and as happy as could be, :i 

Kate returned to Troup Factory in April, 1858. She noted the year "particularly marked by 
the marriage of some of my dearest cousins and friends, a serious break up in our happy circle." 

Cousin Francina Jones was married in June. Cousin Joe Burks in October. Cousin Mary 
Render in November. We had been so intimately associated, I felt real sad. 

1859, though, passed off happily. On December 20, the marriage wave reached our home, 
and Brother Anderson was married [to Virginia A. Reid, of Troup County], the first break 
at home. 

To comfort and relieve myself, if not to others at home, I followed his example, and mar- 
ried Henry E. Moss, of Harris County, Georgia, on 10th April I860, to whom I had been en- 
gaged a long time and loved with all the devotion of my whole nature, 

Wartime Married Life 

Mrs. Moss wrote that "my married life, with all its changes, and events, has been singularly 
blessed and happy. I had been married just two years when my dear husband had to leave me and 
our little Dixie [their son] to go to the dreadful War Between the States." 

After her husband went into service, she and their son moved back to the home of her parents at 
Troup Factory. She remained there about one year. 

Meantime, the health of Henry Moss "had completely let down from having measles in Virginia 
in July, 1862. He was fur toughed for three months, hoping to recover, but returned to his com- 
mand only to suffer untold misery in both camp and hospital during the winter." 

In March, 1863, Henry Moss mustered in a substitute for himself, "Mr. William Lankford, a neigh- 
bor and friend/' and he returned to Georgia. During that year, he "regained some strength, and the 
Moss family moved back to their "little home" in Harris County, near Whitesville, "to be happy with 
each other for a short time again." 

In the spring of 1864, Henry Moss was again "called out" for Confederate army service, with 
the Georgia State Troops, and was in the campaign and siege of Atlanta, He was in the desperate 
fight at Griswoldville, Georgia on November 22, 1864." 

At Griswoldville, Henry Moss was "shocked and partially paralyzed by the bursting of a shell. 
He was sent home and was not able for duty again before Governor Brown [of Georgia] disbanded 
the Militia and General Lee surrendered in Virginia. 

"Then with property nearly all gone, himself in poor health, and myself almost bedridden, we 
had to make a new start in life." 

[367] 




fch 



After the Civil War 

In the winter of 1865, we moved to the old White place near Whitesville, and began to build ud 
our lost fortunes. 

We were greatly blessed, and prospered until 1st of May, 1S75. We lost everything we had 
except our land and lives, by a terrible cyclone. 

t^Al £! time ° f th * cyd0n £ the Moss family consisted of six children. "With the gradual accumula- 

w ° r tSen yearS a11 g T Gi , Mrs - M ° SS wrote ' we saw a P icture ™ liiG 's P 1 ^ we had not expected, 
but our lives were spared and we set to work again, he energetic and hopeful, but myself despond- 
ent How far we have succeeded, or what the result may be, we can not know " 

in the fall of 1880, Mr. Moss thought it would be to his interest to sell our home below 
Whitesville and buy a smaller farm. He did so, and bought the Hood homestead, six miles from 
Hamilton. At the expiation of one year, his Whitesville place was thrown back on his hands and 
gave him great trouble. - . j , * *■■."■ >! **■".*■ f*l3i w& q«T& 9T ^t> 

He rented it for the year 18B2 and made arrangements to go back, sold thl Hood place and 
after two years of life's joys and sorrows, wc go back to the old home. 
The children of Henry E. and Kate Leslie Moss were: 

1. Dixie Moss^ 4 Leslie Moss 7 . Lizzie Anderson Moss 
born June 7 1861 born September 25, 1869 born June 25, 1875 

2. Fanme Lee Moss 5 . Henry Moss ft. Tom Leslie Moss 
born July 19, 186. born October 3, 1S71 born February 14, 1ST8 

3. Amy Moss 6 . Mary Kate Moss 9, Hobert Oliver Moss 
born September 23, 1867 born June 28, 1373 born April 10, 1881 

Six of the Moss children were baptized by the Rev. J. T. Lowe, of the Methodist North Georgia 

bv n the r Rev TmT^ ' *£ ^ "^JST L ^ ie M ° SS Were baptized in ^f MeSodist ?afth 
dj tne tiev. i 1 . M, I, Brannon in September, 1378. 

Robert Oliver Moss was bom on the 21st anniversary of the marriage of Kate and Henry Moss 
He was baptized by the Rev. C. S. Owens, of the Methodist church, in November, 1882 y 

Methodist Conversion 

"I can scarcely tell when or where I received 
my first religious impressions," Mrs. Kate Leslie 
Moss wrote. She listed the teachings of her parents, 
the influence of "my much Joved teacher Mr' 
[John] Park, a "loved Sunday School teacher Mrs 
Myron Ellis, of Greenville," and as "a schoolgirl in 
LaGrange under Mrs. E. Y. Hill [wife of Judee 
E. Y.Hill] r S 

the determination to go forward and 
yield to inclination and duty took hold of me 
in the fall of 1874. I often found myself hesitating 
what church I would join, and after calmly de- 
liberating and weighing all the arguments I could 
control, I decided to join the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. 

I did so, and vvas received into the church 
and baptized by the Rev. J. T. Lowe on 31st 
October 1874 and have tried to live a consistent 
Christian life since then, though often feel afraid 
and ashamed of myself and my shortcomings. 

I love the cause of Christ. I love my church 
devotedly. I love all Christians, and feel that T 
do too little to advance the cause and kingdom 
of my Lord, hope and pray for more light, more 
strength. 

My husband was baptized in infancy, but did 
not make a profession of religion or the church 
until Salem Camp Meeting in 1&B0 and was re- 
ceived into our church with our two daughters 
[Fannie Lee and Amy], the first Sunday in Octo- 
ber 1830 by Rev. F, M. T. Brannon. 

His Christian virtues are many, though some 
duties at his age, he finds it hard to take up. May 
the Lord give him strength, and yet enable him 
to go forward into duty, 

H^H^% E ; Q ^°^ WaS b0 i n Se P teml ? er H 1833 and died December 11, 1885. Mrs. Kate Leslie Moss 







MRS. HENRY EPPES MOSS (1836-1908) 
Nee Katherine "Kale" Leslie, Eldest child and 
daughter of Thomas attd Lou ho V filler? Anderson 
Lt'tiUe, of Troup Factory. 



[368] 



A New Troup Factory 

Old folks in the Rough Edge District of Troup County, Georgia, remembered that Troup Factory 
operated with much of its original equipment about 37 years. It was installed during 1846-47, 

Badly worn machinery, obsolete and inefficient, with a poor market for the mill's old-fashion- 
ed cotton goods, shut Troup Factory down, for about two years, 1884-36, There was little or no pro- 
duction during this time. ,- 

At the famous factory on Flat Shoals Creek, operatives listened for the clanging of the morning bell 
in the cupola. Week after week, and month after month, it did not sound. There was a bleakness 
in Rough Edge and Troup Factory village. Some people talked about moving away, but did not, for 
Troup Factory was their long time home. Others had to move to seek new work and support their 
families. 

There were sad goodbyes as wagons, loaded with families and belongings, pulled away up the steep 
hills. Tears were shed as the beloved scene of factory, creek and bridges faded. 

To quit the cotton mill business or renovate the mill was what management had to decide. The 
fate of Troup Factory and its people seemed to "hang by a thread." 

Officers and board of directors of Troup Factory, all prominent citizens of Troup and Meriwether 
counties, consulted with representatives of Lowell Machine Shop, cotton mill machinery manufac- 
turers of Lowell, Massachusetts, President John Lemuel Robertson, of Troup Factory, began negotia- 
tions for new machines in late 1885 or early 1886. 

Robert H. Stevenson, Treasurer of Lowell Machine Shop, wrote Mr, Robertson on January 29 
1886: 

I write to say that we will accept your order for machinery amounting to about SlG t 000., on 
the following letters of payment, viz; 65 per cent cash when the machinery is ready for ship- 
ment at Lowell, 35 per cent your note at 6 months from date of invoice, without interest, 

A letter from Mr, Stevenson, dated February 23, indicates a change in the terms: 

Your letter of the SOth, addressed to Mr. Holdreth at Lowell, has been forwarded to me for 
reply in regard to terms of payment. 

We will with pleasure enter your order on the following terms, viz: 65 per cent of invoice 
payable by sight draft accompanied by Bill of Lading, and 35 per cent of invoice payable by your 
note at 6 months from date of invoice, without interest. 

Rather than a large cash outlay, "when the machinery is ready for shipment at Lowell/' Mr. Rob- 
ertson preferred the machinery to be built and consigned in several shipments, to be paid for on arrival. 

As the machinery arrived at LaG range, Georgia he would be presented with a "sight draft" with 
bill of lading attached for 65% of the total invoice value of each shipment As he made payment of each 
"sight draft," the machinery would be released for delivery to his wagons. 

The freight terms were f.o.b. Lowell, so the shipments of machinery, loaded in railroad cars, were 
made with freight charges to be collected from the consignee, Troup Factory. 

When the first shipment of two carloads moved on April 13, 1886 Troup Factory was drawn upon 
"at sight, with invoice and B/L [bill of lading] attached, in favor Merchants Nat. Bank of Boston, 
for $2,439,45." This amount was 65% of the invoice value of $3,753.00, actually charged on the books 
of Lowell Machine Shop against Troup Factory, and covered a shipment "of two cars of Machinery 
shipped you yesterday," Mr. Stevenson advised Mr. Robertson on April 14. 

Concerning the rate of freight to be charged by the railroads, Mr. Robertson wrote Lowell on 
April 19. Mr. Stevenson replied on the 22nd: 

By reference to Mr, Holdceth*s letter giving you the rate of freight made with the Great South- 
ern Despatch Line, I think you will find that each car was to be billed at a not less than. 24,000 
lbs, at 63£ per 100 lbs. to Atlanta, [$151.20 total charge per carload]. 

It is customary for freight lines to stipulate the least weight a car shall contain when giv- 
ing rates [i. e ., a minimum weight acceptable to the railroad carriers as a carload, moving through 
to destination as such, without a break point transfer of the goods, and at a better rate of freight 
than afforded less than carload shipment]. 

We expect to ship the balance of your machinery in about two weeks. 

Manifest of First Shipment 

The first shipment, covered by Lowell's invoice of April 13, 1886 included 12 Top Cards, 30 tops 
each, with cylinders 48" in diameter and 36" wide, for $2,100.00. The twelve sets of card clothing 
necessary for the cylinders were $65.00 per set, $780.00. Two lines of Apron Troughs, 8" wide, 6 cards 
each, cost $90.00. 

[369] 







Antique Textile Machines Typical of Troup Factory 







toool carding for domestic use thereafter The above ZT,rLu3 n ! C °" kl haVe served Tra " J Factori J f° r 

mack Valley Textile Museum, North 2*foS£ mZ. "** *** *"*"'*** ""*"¥< Cotlli ^ °f 2JS 









MATTKAHXM KUUW {.IHDI.Vr KMilSHs, 







COTTON CARDING MACHINES WITH RAILWAY HEAD ABOUT 1840 » , „ """ 

Mem», flC £ Vdfey Tfttfite 3tom„. ; J f/ 1L/k " rm " ?J Fflrfo ''Sf *™ ->^«feerf in 1846. Courtesy of 

[370] 



. 



.075 M 


$ 8.25 


.11 ea. 


4.29 


22.00 M 


20. 7 & 


16.00 M 


70.06 


10.00 M 


4.75 


8.00 M 


17,60 


3.00 M 


32,00 


8,00 M 


29.92 


40.00 M 


49.20 


4.00 M 


2.74 



Two Hardy Cylinder Grinders, for grinding the flats of the card cylinders, cost $45.00 each, $90.00. 
Supplies detailed on the invoice were: 

110,000 Oval Head 8 oz. Card Tacks 
39 Lap Sticks 

945 H. Co. Speeder Bobbins 
4,379 H. F. Speeder Bobbins 

475 C, Speeder Skewers 
2,200 F. Speeder Skewers 
4,000 Warp Quills 
3,740 Filling Quills 
1,230 4 x 6" Spools 

085 Spool Skewers 

A charge for boxing the supplies, $5.85, was added to the invoice. 

Reeds and harness for the new looms ordered for Troup Factory were included in the shipment: 

75 Reeds for 2 Harness Goods ® .80 ea. 60.00 

18 Reeds for 3 Harness Goods ,65 ea. 11.70 

75 Sets Harness for 2 Harness Goods 1.30 set 97.50 

18 Sets Harness for 3 Harness Goods 1.65 set 29.70 

Boxing 2M 

Thirteen dozen new shuttles for the looms were shipped, priced at $4.00 per dojen, $52.00. New 
loom strapping, 139% lbs., cost 62<? lb. f $36.65. Five dozen oil cans were billed at $2.50 per dozen, $12.50. 

T <t h Qo^° lfneS ° f Apron Trou £ hs required 130 feet of 7%" 3 ply Rubber Apron Belt, billed at 30^ per 
toot, 4>oy.uu. 

Eighteen Reed Combs were shipped at 70? each, $12.60, Woolen Slasher Cloth, for the new Slash- 
er on order, was included, the ten yards of cloth billed at 35? per yard, $8.50. 

For the Troup Factory laboratory, or superintendent's office, a new Roving and Yarn Scale, $14.00, 
and a Roving and Yarn Reel, $8.00, were shipped. 

A bill of lading and sight draft 
invoice of April 16 covered the fol- 
lowing shipment: 
2 Railway Heads 

1 Speeder Frame, 36 
Spindles, §Vz" space, 
10 W traverse 

2 Speeder Frames, 60 
spindles each, 5" space, 
8Vi" traverse 

1 Spooler, BO spindles, 
space, 6" traverse 

1 Warper 

1 Patrick's Patented 

Warper Creel 
12 Warper Beams, 
with 24" heads 

1 Card Top 

1 Doffer Winding Ma- 
chine; also clamps, 
harnesses, gauges &e 
for clothing cards 

1 Top Card Grinder, 
Curved 



4W 



) 



$ 280.00 



546.00 



1,224,00 



216.00 



200.00 



90.00 



90.00 




90.00 



Total 



$2,766.00 



LOOM, APPROPRIATE FOR COTTON SHEETING, 1867. 
From-. Deschiptive Catalogue of Machines Built by the Brides- 
huhc Manufacturing Company ( Bridesbwg, Fa., 1867), plate 2L 
Courtesy of Merrimack Valhy Textile Museum, 



The sight draft amounted to 65% of the above total, drawn in favor of the Merchants National 
Bank of Boston for $1/797,90. The shipment was a carload. 

On April 20, a bill of lading and sight draft were made for three carloads of machinery: 
1 Cylinder Slasher, with one 5 ft, diameter 
Copper Cylinder, 60" face, L. M. T. Trap & Cone Wind $ 800.00 



1 Overhead Track, with Pulley Block 
52 Looms, with Harness for 36" Goods 
12 Sets of 3 Shade Motions 
30 Tin Cans IS Jt 36" [Roving Cans] < 



® $49.00 ea. 



1.D0 ea. 



35.00 

2,548.00 

60.00 

57.00 



[371] 




6 19" Hand Cards 

1 Folder, 1^4 yards, complete 
1 4/4 Brushing Machine, complete 



Gratis 



215.00 
215.00 




$3, S3 0.00 
Mr. Stevenson forwarded his 
sight draft, as usual, to "G. R Chap- 
man, Esq.," cashier of the Merchants 
National Bank, and notified Mr, Rob- 
ertson he had drawn upon Troup 
Factory. The 65% of invoice value 
amounted to $2,554.50. 

Two carloads of machinery were 
shipped on May 13: 

1 16" Roll Drawing Frame, 
4 lines rolls, 6 rolls 
long, G deliveries, 
4 into 1 = 6 @ 56.00 
4 Warp Ring Frames, 203 
spindles each, 2^k" 
space, 6V4" traverse, 
L.M.S. Adjustable 
IW Rings 
4 Filling Ring Frames, 
192 spindles each, 
2% T1 space, 6" traverse, 
L.M.S. Adjustable 
1%" Rings 1,881.60 

Total $4,256,00 

The sight draft for 65 % amount- 
ed to $2/756,40. 



$ 336,00 



2,038,40 



36-INCH SHEETING LOOM, 1SS8 

From: Loweli, Machine Shop Catalocue, 1888, page 12. Ttmicd 
of the time of the modernization of Trait p Factory in 1S8G Com few 
of Merrimack Valley Textile Museum. 

Erecting Machinists Sent 
Time was allowed for the shipments to be received at LaGrange, Georgia, unloaded on wagons 

at the railroad freight depot, and placement at the Troup Factory mill floors. Old mill equipment was 
removed, scrapped or sold. 

taJ^ L ° W 5 Machine Sh °P dispatched three of their erecting machinists to the mill. On May 6 
1336 Troup Factory was charged for three railroad tickets to Atlanta, Georgia "for men to start 
machinery." The fares were S30.95 each, total $92.85, for Mr. Morse, Mr. Wilcox and Mr. Farnum 
^n u ixpe ™? ° f Mr " Morse t0 set machinery," were billed on May 6 at $38.00. Mr. Wilcox worked 
JoU hours and Troup Factory was charged on June 26 for his time, "hanging shafting at mill " $71 28 
From this it appears that his hourly rate was 19.8c. 

th J^Tf* rX£2 ^f^f 3 dei ; ived P° we * f ™ m the impounded waters of Flat Shoals Creek surging 
hrough its Keffel wheels and water house." Each "room," or floor of the mill had overhead line 
halting suspended from the ceiling, with pulleys, driven and idle, clutches and rope or belting drivel 

to individual machines For the new machinery it was necessary to rearrange and hang shafting 

Iv ral of n?Th a / ° rSe , PUt ^ 24 ° h ° UlS ° f time ' iilab ° r at mil1 '" * 5280 < in *<^ ** hour- 

Wdcox a/c Shafting, &c » £65.10, and 52 pairs Reciprocating Temples at $2.00 per pair, $104.00, 
An invoice of July 9 charged "expense of Mr. Farnum to set machinery," $71.55. 

Troup Factory Brands 

The Lowell Machine Shop shipped on their invoice of June 24, 1336 some new equipment for the 
branding and shipping room at Troup Factory: equipment tor the 

$20.00 

17.00 
© .35 3.50 

28.00 

4.50 

1,10 

Total 17410 



1 Lever Stamping Press 
1 Ink Pad 
10 lbs. Blue Ink 
1 Stamp "Troup Factory" 
1 Stamp "A, A." 
Boxing 



[372] 



^ 






Antique Textile Machines Typical of Troup Factory 

St 




yvntJi irtw 



aamiH lAu. 










THROSTLE (DEAD SPINDLE TYPE) SPINNING FRAME FOR COTTON, ABOUT 1S48. Front: Lowj-ll Ma- 
nuNE Shop Catalogue, 1898, page 1 00. A typical cotton spinning frame of the period when Troup Factory was or- 
ganized in 184G. Courtesy of Merrimack Valley Textile Museum. 




RIMG SPINNING FRAME FOR COTON, 1888. From: Lowell Machine Shop Catalogue 1888, page 37. Typical 
of the time of modernization of Troup Factory in 1886. Courtesy of Merrimack Valley Textile Museum, 

[373] 








"Troup Factory" brand was the main trade name of Troup Factory for its products Sheetings 
were sold under the "A. A." or "Double A" brand and "Troup Factory" brand 

At intervals on the goods, "Troup Factory" was imprinted or branded with the blue ink as well 
as 'A. A." and possibly other markings or brands. 

Settlement of the Note 

Total invoicings for the new machinery furnished by Lowell Machine Shop to Troup Factory 
amounted to $14,705, Under the terms of sight draft, bill of lading attached, 65% was paid as ma- 
chinery arrived, amounting to $9,558.25. This left a balance due, as agreed, of 35 7r, or $5,146,75, 
Along with a statement of the account, Mr. Stevenson wrote Mr. Robertson on August 24, 1886: 
In accordance with our agreement with you, will you kindly send me your company's note 
at six months for $5,146-75, dated April 24. the sum of which is B5% of invoices in settlement 
of the balance due us on machinery, as shown by the enclosed account, and oblige 
The note was due to mature on October 24, 1886. 

Mr. Robertson wrote Lowell Machine Shop and sent the Troup Factory note. It was acknowledged 
by Mr. Stevenson on September 3: 

We are in receipt of yours of the 30th ulto,, enclosing note for $5,146.75 and we herewith 
enclose receipt for said note. 

We have some large payments to make next month and we regret to say that we cannot 
extend the note after its maturity. 

Some question about the note was in Mr. Robertson's mind so he wrote Lowell receiving this 
reply dated September 6: ' 

Yours 31st ulto. duly received. We find you are mistaken in relation to the note which 
you sent us. We find the note is payable to us or to our order and is apparently all right I 
give you below a copy of the note and if you still think it is not properly drawn, please advise 

The Troup Factory note copied by Mr. Stevenson was as follows: 
Troup ) 

Countv J LaGrange, Ga„ April 24, 1386 

Six months after date, the Troup Factory promises to pay the Lowell Machine Shop or to its 
order Five Thousand One Hundred Forty Six & 75/100 Dollars $5,146.75. 
At no interest until after maturity, then at the rate of six per cent (6%) per annum. 

[Signed] J. L, Robertson, 

President of Troup Factory. 
■ n M f r " Ste ^ ns0n wrote M ^ Robertson in his letter of September 3 that due to "large payments" 
in October his company must make, the note could not be extended beyond maturity 

Mr. Robertson and his Troup Factory management decided to pay off the obligation bv an ar- 
r o Xbe r 20 LaG " nge Banklng & ^^ C ° mPany ' LaGrange ' Ge ° rgia and ^ advise * » 

On October 23, Mr. Stevenson wrote Mr. Robertson, "Your note has been sent by our Bank to the 
LaGrange Banking & Trust Co., for collection, as you request." 

Troup Factory Expansion of 1889 

When Mr. Stevenson, of Lowell Machine Shop, acknowledged to Mr. Robertson the last payment 
for the machinery sold Troup Factory for its renovation in 1886, he closed bv "hoping the machinerv 
will work to your entire satisfaction and that it will be successful." 

n^I^iST ff^^u^ ^ FaCt ° ry entered a P ™ d of P«»perity and an expansion was plan- 
ned for 1839. Actually, the carding, drawing and additional spindles for the speeders ordered in 

1889 may have been proposed for the renovation of 1886, Mr. Stevenson wrote Mr. Robertson in his 

letter of January 29, 1886 accepting "your order for machinery amounting to about S16 000 " For fi 

was G ship°p r ed rTiaaT " 5 ^ ""^ ^ ******* "*"***' aS machiner ^ onl ^ in the * m ™ n * °* $H,705. 
SIM™!! 5661 ™ ^^^ ^ the neW ° rder am0unted to frTO-lli ™ d ^ total of the two orders was 



[374] 



Lowell Machine Shop shipped and invoiced on August 31, 1889 the following equipment: 

2 Improved F & P (Fales & Petteel Cards, 

34 flats each, with shell feed @ 

Piecing Out Apron Troughs for 2 Cards 
2 16" Roll Drawing Frames, 2nd process, 
4 lines rolls each, 4 deliveries each, 
3 into 1 

Adding & Spindles to 1 Speeder, 
36 spindles, 6W space 
Adding 12 Spindles each to 2 Speeders, 
60 spindles, 5" space 
Covering Lickerin for 2 F & P Cards 



225.00 
8.00 



G4.00 



16.00 



10.00 



450.00 
16.00 



512.00 



96.00 



240.00 



'with garnet 














25.00 


2 Sets F St P Card Clothing except Lickcrms 








144.S2 


1 Hardy Top Flat Grinder 














136.00 


Supplies: 
















6 Pulleys ) 
















2 Hangers ) 381 


' lbs 










.06 «> lb. 


25.16 


15 ft. 2" Belting 












J2 ft. 


1.30 


35 ft. l%" Belting 












,10 ft. 


3.50 


46 ft lVfe" Belting 












.08 ft. 


3.6S 


46 ft 2Vi" Belting 












.13 ft. 


5.9$ 


24 ft. 7%" Rubber Apron Belt 












.28 ft. 


6.72 


40 Tin Cans 12 x 36" [Roving Cans] 










1.15 


46.00 


Gears : 
















1 Extra Speeder Draft Gear, ea. 


31, 


32 


& 


33 


T 


,01 14 tth 


2.88 


1 Extra Speeder Draft Gear, ea. 


2S, 


29 


& 


30 


T 


.01 tth 


.87 


1 Extra Speeder Bail Gear, ea. 


19, 


20 


& 


21 


T 


.01 tth 


.60 


1 Extra Speeder Cone Gear, ea. 


40, 


42 


& 


44 


T 


,01 tth 


1.26 


4 Extra Speeder Draft Gear, ea. 


22, 


23 


& 


24 


T 


.01% tth 


4.14 


2 Extra Speeder Twist Gear, ea. 


36, 


38 


& 


40 


T 


.01 tth 


2.28 


2 Extra Speeder Rail Gear, ea. 


16, 


17 


& 


16 


T 


.01 tth 


1.02 


2 Extra Speeder Cone Gear, ea. 


50, 


52 


& 


54 


T 


.01 tth 


3.12 


16 Extra Spin Draft Gear, ea. 


29, 


30 


& 


31 


T 


.01 tth 


21.60 


S Extra Spin Draft Gear, ea. 


54 


T 








.01^ tth 


6,43 


1 Extra Drawing Draft Gear, ea. 


39, 


40 


& 


11 


T 


.01 & tth 


1,80 


2 Extra Railway Gears, ea. 


37 


T 








.01 % tth 


1,10 


12 Extra Card Draft Gears, ea. 


12 


& 


7G 


T 






9.30 






Total 



$i,769,n 



Troup Factory Repair and Replacement Parts 

From the Lowell Machine Shop account books, an extraction was made by the author of the ma- 
chinery repair and replacement parts shipped and invoiced Troup Factory. The period covered was from 
August 19, 1S86 through November l f 1890. 

The items were common cotton mill repair and replacement parts necessary for the operation. 
They were kept in the factory supply room. 

It is obvious from the list that all repair and replacement parts and sundry mill supplies were not 
bought from Lowell. Some parts and repairs were made in the mill shop or blacksmith shops at 
Troup Factory. 

Machine shops and foundries in Georgia and elsewhere made gears and other parts for cotton mills 
of the South. Troup Factory records on this phase are not available. 

The unit prices show some increases during the period studied. 

Repair Paris Purchased By Troup Factory 
From Lowell Machine Shop, 1886-1890 

Part 
Binders, Shuttle, and Studs 
Bolsters, Short Shell 
Bolsters, Short Shell and Steps 
Bolts, 5/16 x 3 1/8", arid Nuts 
Bolts, 5/16 x 3 1/8", and Nuts 
Bolts, 3/8 x Zty\ and Nuts 

[375] 





Unit 




Quantity 


Price 


Total 


48 


.20 


$ 9.60 


800 


.12 


96.00 


200 


.22 


44.00 


72 


.02^ 


1.62 


144 


.03 Vi 


4.68 


72 


.03 


2.16 











Chains, Builder, for Spinning 

Fingers, Protector Rod 

Flanges, 5" space 

Flanges, 6 Ms" space 

Flyers, 6 V 

Gears, Bevel, Double, 48 teeth 

Gears, Bevel, Single, 24 teeth 

Gears, Intermediate Railway, 22 teeth 

Gears, Intermediate Twist, 30 teeth 

Gears, Railway Cone, 19 teeth 

Gears Railway Cone, 20 teeth 

Gears, Railway Cone, 21 teeth 

Gears, Railway Cone, 22 teeth 

Gears, Speeder Twist, 29 teeth 

Gears, Speeder Twist, 30 teeth 

Gears, Speeder Twist, 31 teeth 

Gears, Speeder Twist, 32 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Draft, 26 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Draft, 26 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Draft, 27 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Draft, 28 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Twist, 25 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Twist, 33 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Twist, 34 teeth 

Gears, Spinning Twist, 38 teeth 

Gear, Spinning Twist, 39 teeth 

Gears, Tension, 37 teeth 

Gears, Tension, 39 teeth 

Gears, Tension, 41 teeth 

Guides, Thread, 1%" 

Irons, Race 

Loops, Leather Picker (1% lbs.) 

Pawls, Railway Evener 

Pickers, Leather Loom 

Pinions, Beam, 16 teeth 

Pinions, Speeder, 16 teeth 

Points, Pick Cam 

Press- in, 5" 

Press -in, 6" 

Quills, Filling 

Racks, Filling 

Rods, Protector, 36" 

Shells, Long Bar Drawing, 16" covered 

Shells, Speeder Frame, G^" space, covered 

Springs, Beal Lever 

Springs, Parallel 

Springs, Parallel 

Springs, Shuttle Binder 

Springs, Spiral, in Racking Arm 

Stands, Beam Pinion 

Strippers, Hand Card 

Studs, Binder 

Studs, Binder 

Tongues, Parallel 

Tongues, Parallel 

Travelers, Ring, Hicks No. 9 

Trumpets, Adjustable, and Stems 

Washers, Parallel 

Washers, Parallel 

Worms, Let Off, and Gears 

Total $385 13 

Details of the new machinery for the Troup Factory renovation of 1886 were located in the collec- 
tions of Baker Library, Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration, Boston Mas- 
sachusetts. The collections contain records of the great New England textile machinery manufacturers 
Robert W. Lovett, Curator of Manuscripts and Archives, was most helpful in supplying the au- 
thor with copies of pertinent material embodied in this article. 



2 


.30 


.60 


27 


.12 


3.24 


6 


1.80 


10.80 


6 


2.25 


13.50 


6 


2.25 


13.50 


3 


1.00 


3.00 


3 


.25 


.75 


2 


.35 


.70 


?> 


.01 tth 


.90 


2 


.01 tth 


.38 


2 


.01 tth 


.40 


2 


.01 tth 


.42 


2 


.01 tth 


.44 


2 


.01 tth 


.58 


2 


.01 tlh 


.60 


2 


.01 tth 


.02 


2 


-01 tth 


.64 


16 


.01^ tth 


6.00 


4 


.01 tth 


1.04 


16 


.02 tth 


3.04 


16 


.02 tth 


e_% 


4 


.01 tth 


1.04 


4 


.01 tth 


1.32 


4 


.01 tth 


1-36 


4 


-01 tth 


1.52 


4 


•01 tth 


1.56 


2 


.01 tth 


.74 


2 


.01 tth 


.78 


2 


.01 tth 


.82 


72 


.60 gro. 


.30 


16 


.25 


4.00 


144 


,65 lb. 


1.22 


4 


.12 


.48 


30 lbs. 


.45 lb. 


13,50 


54 


.18 


9.72 


2 


,27 Vz 


.55 


24 


.07 


1.68 


6 


.Iff 


.60 


6 


.12 


.72 


2,547 


,012 


30.56 


G 


.10 


.60 


6 


.SO 


3.60 


6 


.50 


3.00 


12 


.22 


2.64 


24 


.06 


1.44 


48 


.12 


5.76 


48 


.15 


7.20 


144 


,06 


8.64 


48 


.01 Vs 


.72 


12 


.40 


4.80 


6 


9.50 da 


4.75 


24 


.05 


1.20 


72 


.06 


4.32 


20 


.08 


2.08 


12 


.10 


7.20 


3,000 


.52 


1.56 


2 


3.33 


6.SG 


36 


.06 


2.16 


72 


.08 


5.76 


12 


.40 


4.80 



[376] 






Last Days of Troup Factory, 1895-1898 

Orw^es barren Cofless, who owns the Troup factory property, and has made his home there 
for years, has an old daybook of the mill. The paymaster or bookkeeper kept the monthly pay roll for 
the period of March, 1895 through June, 1898 in the book. It is a record of the last days of Troup Fac- 
tory, a pioneer cotton textile mill of Western Georgia, which began operations in 1847. 

The daybook is lined vertically to form columns and the headings are written, Name, Time, Wages, 
A/C [account of individual at the Troup Factory Store or commissary] and Bal. [balance, net pay after 
deduction of account owed at the commissary, for meal from the grist mill, etc.] . There is a column 
for rate of pay. 

Troup Factory was a pioneer industrial center for the Troup and Meriwether counties area. Cot- 
ton factory, cotton gin, grist mill, tanyard, shoemaker, furniture and coffin making, were all industries 
growing out of the needs of an agrarian economy. 

The endeavors were concentrated at Troup Factory, where there was notable water power from 
Flat Shoals Creek for the looms and grinding rocks. Perry Creek provided water for the cotton gin 
and tanyard. 

In the Troup Factory village, and surrounding countryside, was a stable population of operatives: 
men, women and children. Their wages were recorded in the daybook pay roll record: 

TROUP FACTORY 

DAILY WAGES 1895-1898 

In Cents per Day 



Men 


Boys 


Women 


Girts 


90 


20 


m 


20 


75 


IS 


50 


19 


70 


16 


45 


18 


65 


15 


40 


15 


60 


14 


33 


13 


50 


13 


37^ 


12 


40 


12 


37 


10 


30 


10 


36 
35 
31 

30 
27 
25 





The superintendent of Troup Factory for many years, Robert Southwell White, served in that ca- 
pacity during the period under consideration. His salary was $50.00 per month. He was also "head 
carder" and was paid 75£ per day for that job. "Dalt" Hanner and S. H. Frayther were "overseers" 
and they were paid $1.50 per day. John Bowles, with the highest "day hand" rate for men, 90£ per day, 
was presumably in a supervisory job, possibly assistant overseer. 

Troup Factory had 64 operatives on the pay roll for March, 1895, Of these, 51 day hands were 
entitled to wages as follows: 





Time 


Daily 








Name 


(Days worked) 


Rate 


Wages 


A/C 


Bal. 


Ashford, Ben 


24 


.50 


$12.00 


.65 


$1L35 


Belcher, George 


23 


.50 


U.50 


■ 




Borders, Anna 


23 


.12 


2.75 






Borders, Lou 


22 te 


.33 


3.55 






Borders, Sallie 


23 


.36 


8.30 






Bowles, Anna 


23 


.60 


13,80 






Bowles, John 


23 


.90 


21.80 


4.90 


10.90 


Bowles, Lucian 


23 


.65 


14.95 






Culpepper, Francis 


23 


.40 


9.20 






Davis, Althea 


19>£ 


,36 


7.02 






Davis, Carrie 


22tt 


ao 


2,22 






Davis, Mary 


22V<> 


.31 


6.97 






Davis, Will 


19% 


.10 


2.20 






Davis, William 


22 te 


,70 


15,75 


.75 


15.00 


Fergerson, Andy 


23 


,16 


3.70 






Fergerson, Anna 


22% 


.30 


3.10 






Fergerson, Mariah 


23 


.31 


7.15 






Fergerson^ S. C. 


11% 


.75 


8.60 







[377] 




Fuighum, Thomas 
Hanner, Clara 
Hanner, Da It 
Hardy, Priddy 
Hart, Charles 
Hart, Dan 
Hart, Jim 
Hegler, Alice 
Justice, Cora 
Justice, Fannie 
Justice, F. M. 
Justice, Nettie 
Murphy, Bettie 
Murphy, Frank 
Fhillips, Leona 
Phillips, Sallie 
Pitts, Dick 
Porter, Florence 
Porter, Frank 
Porter, Kate 
Porter, Pauline 
Porter, Vesta 
Prayther, S. H, 
Smith, Cal 
Smith, George 
Smith, Will 
Waldrop, Alice 
Waldrop, Idelia 

Waldrop, Ola 
White, R. S, 

Carding 
White, Ben 
White, Ed 
Sees, Boyd 



14 Va 
3 
23 
24 
23 
^3 
22 

n 

21% 
19 
26 
23 
53 
1 
20 Vs. 
34 
19 
19% 
£8^ 
23 
23 
20 

n 

5S% 
24 

23 
16 
T 
22% 

£3 
23 
£3 

6 



.70 

.37% 

1.50 

.40 

.12 

.12 

.40 

.31 

.37^ 

.35 

.75 

.19 

.13 

.50 

.25 

.13 

.75 

.25 

.40 

.25 

.15 

-20 
1.50 

.70 

.40 

,70 

.36 
.50 
.36 

.18 

.75 
.75 
.20 

.40 



9,95 


.60 


9.35 


1,12 


.50 


.52 


34,50 


.60 


33.90 


9.60 


1,75 


7.85 


2 r 75 






2//S 






8.80 






6,80 






8.05 






6.65 


.50 


6.15 


19,50 






4.35 






6.90 


.50 


6.40 


.50 






5.10 






4.40 


l.OO 


3.40 


14.25 






4.95 


.75 


4.20 


11.40 






5.75 


.75 


5.00 


3.45 






4.00 






34.50 


1.00 


33.50 


1610 


.60 


15,50 


23.50 






16.80 


4.20 


12,60 


8.30 






8.00) 






£.52) 




10,52 


4.05 






50,00) 


15.50 




17.25) 


.60 


75.40 


17.35) 






4 r 60) 






2.40) 







Weavers Paid by the Cut 

Troup Factory weavers were paid by the "cut" of cloth, this being a standard classification in 
the textile industry for length of goods produced from the looms of the weavers, as follows: 
Single Cuts, 50 to 55 yards Double Cu% 100 tQ nQ g 

minimum 4(m * ards minimum 80 yards 

maximum 79% yards maximum 159 yards 

Other classifications were: 



Shorts ....... 10 tt to 25 yards PoLmd Pieces , ^ to 2 dg 

Long Pjeces .... 25 >% to 40 yards Remnants 2ft to 10 yards 

Pieces and cuts were sewed together. The rolls of "Troup Factory" branded sheetings probably 
contained about 600 yards, mostly in continuous lengths, with no roll containing more than three nieces 
and no piece less than 100 yards. F 

In bales the content was probably 1,000 to 1,100 yards. Branded single cuts could contain not 
more than three pieces (long pieces) 25V 4 to 40 yards each. A regular bale of sheetings probably con, 
tamed about 20 to 24 pieces. r J 

Goods produced by the weavers on the looms of Troup Factory were 36 inches in width Sheet 
ings, Osnaburgs, Drills and Twills were manufactured. 

Pound pieces [sold by the pound] and remnants were put up in bales. 

There were goods of first quality called and graded as "firsts" by the inspectors Goods with im- 
perfections of weaving or other faults were called "seconds. 1 ' There was a market for both classes. 



[378] 



Weaver Cuts and Wages 

Weavers at Troup Factory on the March, 1S95 pay roll produced the number of cuts shown be- 
low and were paid at the rate of lie per cut for sheetings- 





Cuts 


Wages 




Cuts 


Wages 


Andrews, Mary 


L2S 


J1410 


Fulghum, Fannie 


132 


$14,50 


Belcher, Ella 


12S 


14.10 


Hardy, Sallie 


117 


12.90 


Bowles, Maggie 


169 


18.60 


Hart, Lou 


128 


14,15 


Bowles, Mary 


141 


15.50 


Nor r is, George 


41 


4.50 


demons, Jane 


140 


15.40 


N orris, Mattie 


171 


18,80 


Duncan, Jane 


12S 


1410 


White, Sarah 


143 


15.75 


Duncan, John 


ies 


18.40 









''Day hands'' added 21 V\ cuts to the production, and no amount was shown, as this was figured 
in their daily wage rate. 

The paymaster "rounded off* the wages to the nearest nickel. In addition, four of the weavers 
had slightly more than the whole number of cuts listed. For instance, Lou Hart had 128 la cuts, her 
total indicated on the payroll, and was paid accordingly. 

During March, 1395 the time worked at Troup Factory was 23 days and the production figures 
for the month were: 

Total Cuts 1,757 Average Daily Yardage 3,149 

Total Yards 72,431 Looms Run 52 

The number of bales of cotton worked was 54 bales, weighing 26,955 lbs. At the end of the month 
the factory had 78 bales of cotton on hand. 

Baled cotton not in process was stored at the factory in a warehouse. At times cotton was on hand 
in LaG range, a distance of ten miles, and Chipley [now Pine Mountain] seven miles away. 

Wage Increases 

Operatives at Troup Factory received wage increases after proving themselves on the job. They 
were awarded increases for improved capacity and occasionally moved into better paying jobs as op- 
eratives went "out," or left the employ of Troup Factory. 

Anna Borders, beginning at 12? per day in March. 1395 was raised to 18? in April, during which 
she worked 26 days and received $4,68 wages, owing nothing to the commissary. 

Carrie Davis, beginning at 10? per day, was raised to 1214? in May, and dropped to 12^ in June. 
Will Davis was raised from 10<? to 12 Vfe? in May and dropped to 12? in June, Carrie and Will stayed on 
that wage until April, 1896 when they were raised to 13?. 

Ola Waldrop was raised from 18? to 20c in June, 1895, Leona Phillips got married in June, 1895 
and her wage went up as Mrs. Leona Duncan from 25? to 31<?! Kate Porter also moved up from 25? 
to 31? per day in June, 1895. 

Dan Hart, starting at 120, was raised to 130 in April, 1895. Charles Hart, who won a raise from 
12? to 13? in May, 1895 stayed put until March, 1806 before he was raised again to 16<*. 

It was customary for several members of a family to work in Troup Factory. In the Davis family, 
Carrie Davis received another raise in March, 1897 to 16? a day, after working a year at 13?* Will 
Davis finally got a raise from 13? to 190 in April, 1897 and that month Carrie Davis went up to 19?. 

Carrie Davis was evidently a splendid worker for she was raised to 25? per day in July, 1897. At 
that time, Will Davis was still at 19?, where he remained until the end of the record. 

Meantime, Carrie Davis was raised from 25? to 30? in August, 1897 and upped to 36? in November, 
1897 where she remained until the end of the record. 

Alice Davis started in August, 1897 at 10? per day but was "out" from April, 1898 to end of record. 

There was no apparent change in the daily wage rates set for adult jobs and supervisory help dur- 
ing the period. Anna Bowles was at 60? per day in March, 1895 and 60? at the end of the record in 
1898. Ben Ashford was 50? then and 50? at the end. George Belcher was 50? at the beginning of the 
period and 50? at the end, as was Thomas Fulghum, 70c and 70c Mariah Fergerson was 31 o in March, 
1895 and 31c at the end. 

[379] 







Troup Factory Pay Rolf Book 



5fl 



/£y^-*^ fr-J^ $jfc 






I oil 






,/faf*^ ' 



7 ^fyt^-i-y 



^-*-3 '$*^ 



// 







1 



0' 






I _, 

r 

f 



7 



\ 



V 



t\ 






<? e 



ys** 





jfm 



! 'i-'' 



Ik 



\ 

A if!'!' 



I 



it 

,1i 






lfl£ 



l'.' 



T380] 



Troup Factory Pay Roll Book 



I 






W 



! JJ . 3 



H^c^ 



/7 



< ? 






7Uy 



*Ht+^c*-* 








2$J 

) 




;.o 



! Li <• 



/! 




/^ J/? 






■ 7^ 



*z^<^ S& 



i 












■ " 

2. </ / d 



- / 









6 iaj 






1/ 1* 




* 



">£r>'£V-'£ # 



; 



■ 



ho 



I 



7V v/v 



T/ t fi 



fc ij" 







r 



J r ! l' 3f j 



TROUP FACTORY PAY ROLL FOR APRIL, 1897 - Pages 50 <™rf Si from the paymaster's daybook, A "(toy" wan 
twelve hours of work. The rate of pay may be determined from, the nnheaded column following "Time," The "1896" 
date at the beginning of page 50 is an error. Corless Collection. 

[381] 





Sheetings and Osnaburgs 

The weavers stayed on the lie per cut wage for sheetings until December, 1897, George Norris was 
paid for his 138 Osnaburg cuts that month at 8t per cut, $11.04, and for 38 cuts of sheeting at IU, $4.18. 
totalling $15,22 and rounded off at 815.20 in wages. 

In the resumption of Osnaburgs manufacturing, Mary Bowles had 132 cuts at 8£, $10.56, and 52 
cuts of sheetings at 11?, $5.72, rounded off by the paymaster at $16.25. Mattie Norris had 132 cuts 
of Osnaburgs at 8c, $10.56, and the highest number of cuts of sheetings for the month, 81 cuts at 
1H, $3.91, total $19.50 wages. 

Sarah White had the highest number of cuts of Osnaburgs, 172^, at 3£, $13,79, and 39^ cuts of 
sheetings at lie, $4.35, net wages $18.15. 

During January, 1898 Mattie Norris was paid for her 180 Osnaburg cuts at 8^ $14.40, and for three 
cuts of sheetings at lie, 33c, total $14.73, rounded off at $14.75 in wages. 

Mary Bowles had 158 cuts of Osnaburgs, at 8£, $12.64, and six cuts of sheetings at IIP, 66c 
working out exactly for the paymaster at 313.30, George Norris had 132 cuts of Osnaburgs at 8*, $10.5fr 
and supplemented his take with some sheetings for the month, four cuts, at IU, 44£, total $11.00 wages. 

Jane Duncan had the highest number of cuts of Osnaburg, 189^ at 8£, $15.16, and three cuts of 
sheeting at 11*, 33c, rounding off at $15.50. She owed the commissary $1.50, so she drew net pay of 
$14.00 for the month of January, 1893. 

The split in weaver rates is significant for it shows that the demand for sheetings was off and the 
factory was trying to balance its production with the coarser fabrics, Osnaburgs. Every weaver shared 
in the higher wage for sheetings except two, Maggie Bowles and Sallie Borders, who produced only 
Osnaburgs in January, 1898. 

Back on Sheetings 

Things picked up in March, 1898 and all the weavers were back on sheetings. They were paid at 
the rate of lie per cut. Mattie Norris had 207 ^ cuts, the highest that month, and Jane Duncan had 
204. Their wages were $22.30 and $22.45, respectively. Sheeting production was paid for at the lie per 
cut wage until the end of the record, and this was apparently the only fabric produced. 

During the period of the pay roll, John Duncan made the highest number of cuts of sheetings 
in May, 1895 with 210 cuts. Mattie Norris had 205 cuts in April, 1395, Jane Duncan had 205 cuts in 
April, 1396. Twelve weavers for the 52 looms of Troup Factory, from first to last, always drew some- 
thing for their production each month. 

The factory did not operate well in August, 1895. Workers made only about six days and less. Mary 
Bowles produced 28^ cuts of sheetings, at IK, $2.15 in wages. Fannie Fulghum had the lowest num- 
ber, 14% cuts, at Up, $1.60 wages. Total of cuts for the month, including 27 M; by the day hands, was 
464, 

Pay roll for August, 1395 amounted to only $253.85, less accounts at the commissary, $33.75, net 
$220.10. A notation was made that $200,00 of the net amount was "paid for work in mill;' balance for 
work on water house and mill repairs," 

Slack Times 

Troup Factory was apparently closed during September, 1395 as no pay roll is recorded for that 
month. It is possible that a miscellaneous maintenance or expense pay roll was paid "out of pocket" 
or recorded elsewhere. 

July, 1896 was a slack time. Most of the operatives worked 12% days and less, producing total cuts 
of 1,013. 5 

During February, 1397 the factory ran about 20 days, but there was a tapering off in time down to 
three days for some operatives. Total cuts were 1,439^, including a disproportionately large number 
by the day hands, 157 cuts. 

Troup Factory people experienced a poor month in September, 1897. Most of them worked only 
11 days and some were down to three days. Production was 845 cuts. October, 1897 was no better, 
with most of the operatives on the job for 10% days, producing 823 cuts. 

In November, 1897 the outlook was brighter. Nearly everybody made 20 days in the factory and 
produced 1,43214 cuts, J 

The first months of 1893 seemed a little more promising, but in May the operatives worked 
about l9 : /2 days, producing L340 cuts. 



[382] 



June, 1398 was the final month of operation of Troup Factory. Cuts totalled 1,369, including seven 
by the day hands, amounting to a total of 55,845 yards for the month. Twelve bales of cotton were 
worked for the month. What stock was on hand, either in goods or bales of cotton, is not shown. 

At the bottom of page 79 in the pay roll book, under the total for June, 1898, £446.62, are the 
words; "Mill closed down July 9, 1898." 

On page 80, the last in the book, are some short, miscellaneous pay rolls for July, August, Sep- 
tember and October, 1898. They are mostly for maintenance, including work on the roof by Ed White, 
3Vfe days at 50? per day; a well bucket, 3fc; 3% lbs. of nails, 15*=. 

Some white waste laps were sold from the factory in August for $7.00. A small amount of meal 
from the grist mill was sold. 

Famous old Troup Factory was advertised for sale in October, 1898 and sold by the Troup County 
Superior Court to Lemuel Madison Park in January t 1899. 

From the paymaster's book the Troup Factory pay rolls are extracted as follows: 

TROUP FACTORY 
Pay Rolls 

1895- 1898 



Year 

1895 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



Total 

$ 736,04 
812.11 
V90.30 
757.50 

764.50 
25385 

739.38 
756.05 

710,71 



Totals 


86,320.44 


1896 




January 


$ 653. 20 


February 


750.10 


March 


779.90 


April 


780,30 


May 


730.50 


June 


721.45 


July 


47B.10 


August 


594.50 


September 


559.70 


October 


668.68 


November 


748,81 


December 


72S.90 


Totals 


$3,193.14 


1S97 




January 


$ 740.92 


February 


596.06 


March 


652,55 


(Error corrected - 


- Sallie Bowles) 


April 


711.60 


May 


543,45 


June 


549,65 


July 


516.65 


August 


546.20 


September 


380.59 


October 


404.30 


November 


636.73 


December 


744.0 a 



Totals 



$7,028.31 



Account 

$ 38,55 
15.93 
36.85 
32.35 
9.65 
33.75 

24.29 
24.95 
59.87 

$27^-24 

$ 22.05 
37.30 
26.00 
24.90 
23.28 
44,80 
17.70 
0.65 
18.75 
17.90 
18.07 
71.31 

S323.71 

$ 65.85 
39.90 

50.12 

36.70 
45.62 
22.98 
20.10 
25.80 
20.19 
26.05 
37 .8 8 
59,50 

$451.69 



Net 

697.49 
796.13 
753.45 
725.15 
754.85 
220.10 

715.09 

731.10 
650.84 



$6,044.20 

$ 631.15 
712.80 
753,90 
755,40 
707.22 
676.65 
460.40 
587.85 
540.95 
650.78 
730,74 
655.59 

$7,863.43 

$ 639.07 
556.16 
602.43 
5.13 
674.90 
497.33 
526,67 
496.55 
520.40 
360.40 
378.25 
598.90 
634.56 

36,591.25 



[3S3] 




1898 






January 


$ 728.25 




February 


664.05 




March 


762.60 




April 


689.80 




May 


594,80 




June 


379.48 




Less credits 






for meal from 






grist mill: 






R. S. White 


$3 


..SO 


Dave Forrester 




.30 


Anna Justice 




.30 


Cal Smith 




.60 


Ben Ash ford 




.30 


A, W. Davis 




.30 



$ 29.50 

17,05 
20.15 
27.60 
19.40 
16.83 

Paid by Mr. Hasty 



698.75 
647.05 
742.05 
662.20 

575.40 
362.65 

87.57 



Totals 



The Troup Factory 
extracted and compiled 



Year 

and 
Month 

1895 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Totals 
1S96 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Totals 

1837 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 



$3 h 8ie.98 $130.53 $3,772.07 

pay roll book also contains the monthly cloth production reports. They are 
as follows: 

TROUP FACTORY 

Monthly Cloth Production 

1895-1808 

Average Bales Weight Bales Time 

Total Total Daily Looms Cotton Cotton Cotton Worked 

Cuts Yards Yardage Run Worked lbs. on hand (Days) 



1,757 
2,029.5 
2,123 
1,968 
1,994 
464 

1,704 
1,880.5 

1,672 



15,592 

1,482 

1,935 

2,031.5 

2,066 

1,912 

1,853 

1.013 

1,384 

1,242 

1,531 

1,900 

1,871.5 

20,221 



72,431 

83,852 
37,656 
80,433 
81,526 
19,413 

69,889 

77,395 
68,551 



641,146 

60,987 
79,625 
83,357 
85,023 
79,044 
79,504 
42,337 
57,340 
51,333 
63,570 
78,473 
78,335 



3,149 
3,225 
3,246 

3,217 
3,197 
3,236 

2,912 

3,127 
3,116 



3,128 
3,185 
3,206 
3,270 
3,162 
3,348 
3,321 
3,186 
3,209 
3,101 
3,270 
3,133 



26,955 
30,619 
33,344 
31,312 
32,349 
0,855 

24,274 
29,342 
24,313 



490 



239,363 

23,195 
29,078 
31,379 
32,168 
29,153 
26.754 



18,191 
22,660 
28,637 
28,226 



203^ 



S38,933 549 

• (79 here, 62 in Chipley) 



269,441 



261^ 



1,835 


75,487 


2,960 


50 


63 


31,451 


_^_ 


25^ 


1,439.5 


59,304 


3,041 


52 


44 


22,538 


6 


19& 


1,625 


67,322 


3,206 


nl 


50 


25,027 


11 


21 


1,826 


75,464 


3,231 


52 


55 


28,056 


11 


23 


1,336 


57.135 


3,174 


52 


42 


20,991 


7 


18 


1,419 


58,53& 


3,252 


52 


44 


21,111 


12 


18 


1,329 


55,177 


3,246 


52 


3S 


18,560 


9 


17 


1,409.5 


53,506 


3,251 


52 


44 


21,047 


2 


IS 


845 


34,806 


3.164 


52 


28 


14,674 


23 


11 



[384] 



October 


323 


34,100 


3,172 


52 


24 


12,102 


29 


10% 


November 


1,482.25 


61,951 


3,098 


52 


43 


22,167 


27 


20 


December 


2,271 


93,9150 


3,874 


52 


77 
552 


39,264 


4 


24 y* 


Totals 


17,690% 


731,750 


276,988 


226 


1898 


















January 


2,020.5 


a 5, 732 


3,572 


44 


w 


4L633 


3 


24 


February 


1,645 


67,470 


2,871 


45 


50 


25,132 


23 


23 ft 


March 


2,105.5 


86,431 


3,201 


r>2 


ar 


33,344 


40 


27 


April 


1,963 


30,231 


3,343 


52 


61 


30,135 


3 


24 


May 


1,340 


55,847 


2,864 


51 


40 


19,807 


7 


19% 


June 


1,369 


55,845 


— 


— 


12 


— 


— 


— 


July 


Mill closed down July 9, 


1893. 













Belcher, Ella 
Bowles, Maggie 

Ashford, Ben 
Belcher, George 
Borders, Annie 
Bowles, Anna 
Bowles, John 



Bowies, Mary 
demons, Jane 



Davis, Althea 

Davis, Carrie 
Davis, Will 

Davis, William 
Fergerson, Andy 



Hardy, Sallie 
Norm, George 

Justice, F. M. 
Justice, Nettie 
Murphy, Bettie 
Prayther, S. H. 
Smith, Cal 



Nonis, Mattie 
White, Sarah 

Smith, George 

Smith, Will 

White, Ben 

White, Ed 

White, R. S. 



Total* 10,443 431,556 313 150,051 US 

The highest production for any month in the period was for December, 1897 with 2,271 cuts and 
93,960 yards. Average yardage per day for the 24% days worked was 3,874 yards, or a daily aver- 
age of 74*4 yards per loom for the 52 looms operating that month. It was also the highest average daily 
yardage for the period. 

Troup Factory, a country cotton mill, surrounded by an agricultural community from the begin- 
ning until the end, was rather remote and undisturbed by urban proximity. Even the Yankees could 
not find it to burn it! 

In the village, there was not much moving in or out of families. Labor turnover at Troup Fac- 
tory seems remarkably good. As long as there was hope of work, the operatives stayed. Of the 64 
operatives on the pay roll of March, 1895 there were 35 on the last pay roll in June, 1898. These op- 
eratives were: 

Weavers 

Duncan, Jane 
Duncan, John 

Day Hands 

Fergerson, Anna 
Fergerson, Mariah 
Fulghum, Thomas 
Hanner, Clara 
Harmer, Dalt 

For full time manufacturing, a force of about 64 operatives was employed at Troup Factory. When 
woven goods and yarns were ready for shipment they were loaded on Ben Ashford's wagon to head to 
LaGrange or Chipley, the shipping points. Some sales were made at the factory. 

During the period considered, there was little change in weavers. Alice Waldrop moved up to 
this better paying job from day hand in February, 1896. Sallie Borders moved up to weaving in 
March, 1897 and Verada Hay in August, 1897, 

Those newly hired were: 

Day Hands 

Hay, Lucius 
Hay, Mattie 
Heglev, Allen 
Justice, A. 
Justice, Mary 
Kendall, Will 
Koon, Marion 

Occasionally in the pay roll book, with the cloth production report for the month, a notation was 
made of the number of bales of goods on hand at the factory. In March, 1893, 22 bales of sheet- 
ings were on hand and eight bales in April. Five bales were on hand in May. For June. 1898, the last 
month of operation, there was no notation. 

After buying Troup Factory in 1899, Lemuel Madison Park operated it on the bank of Flat Shoals 
Creek until 1902. It was then dismantled and moved to LaGrange, Georgia, ten miles away. Park 
Mills, the new corporation, went out of business about 25 years later. 

At the Troup Factory settlement, factory and cottages were dismantled and hauled away. The 
mill families who did not move to farms or elsewhere followed the factory to LaGrange, where a cotton 
textile manufacturing center was building. Others went to Columbus, Georgia to mills there. Some 
went to the Chattahoochee River valley and mills of the West Point Manufacturing Company. 



Borders, Charles 
Borders, Lou 
Bowles, Jennie 
Bowles, Lenora 
Bowles, Leonard 
Bowles, Lucian 
Bowles, Mary 



Bowles, MeGee 
Culpepper, T. 
Davis, Alice 
Forrester, Dave H. 
Fulghum, J, D, F. 
Fulghum, Jim 
Hay, Gallic 



Koon, Virgil 
McGhee, Mattie 
Morgan, Aaron 
Phillips, Viola 
Quick, Fannie 
Smith, Fannie 
Swift, Henry 



Waldrop, A. W. 
Waldrop, Bessie 
White, Lewis 
Wright, Eva 
Wright, Joe 
Wright, Stella 
Wright, W. B. 






[385] 




RUINS AT TROUP FACTORY 





















■■■■■*■■■ 



Vines have smothered the rains of this rock storage 
building near the site of Troup Factory. In the rear 
wall is an opening for a window or ventilator. 




j Hf. 






^^^■nc 



Old Rock Dam for Troup Factory Water Power 
West end of dam. 




BRIDGE PIER OF FIELD ROCK 
This rock bridge pier is on the east side of Flat 
Shoals Creek. It once supported part of the covered 
bridge. Present highway bridge is seen upstream. 




Flat Shoah Creek pours through the wide, broken 
opaiiiHg in the rock dam. 



Troup Factory Recalled 

An old mounting block, where gentlemen mounted and ladies were lifted with a manly arm into 
their buggy or carriage or onto horses, is a native stone monument at the site of the Superintend- 
ent's House at Troup Factory. Two large crepe myrtle bushes stand guard at the beginning of a front 
walk once leading to the house from a picket fence and gate. 

While the place was known for years as the Superintendent's House, it was longer the home of 
Thomas Leslie (1812-1887), one of the founding partners of Troup Factory on Flat Shoals Creek, Troup 
County, Georgia. The mill here was first established as Brooks' Mill by Maxey Brooks (1791-1&61). 

James Madison Creed Robertson (1809-1886), of Meriwether County, and Thomas Leslie, of Meri- 
wether and Troup counties, and their associates, bought the Brooks property and established a cotton 
manufactory there in 1846-47. 

The last superintendent of Troup Factory, Robert Southwell White, began in the mill about i860 
as a "sweeper boy >! and worked up to superintendent of the factory. He and his family were living 
in the Leslie home at the time Troup Factory was bought by Lemuel Madison Park in 1899. 

Mr. White's daughter, Catherine McGee White, was born at Troup Factory on October 30, 1871, 
Now Mrs, W. A. Emory, she lives in 1971 at Long Cane Community, Troup County. Mrs, Emory is 
a remarkable person of "going on 100 years," whose friends call her, among other endearing and ad- 
miring terms, "a sweet Southern lady." 




. 



MRS. WILLIAM A. EMORY 
Mts, Emory, nee Catherine McGee White, daughter 
of Robert Southwell and. Martha Lewis Owen 
White, was bom October -30, JS7J at Troup Fac- 
tortj, She lives (1971) in Long Cane Community. 
Troup County, Photographed on her 97tit birthday 
with her dog "Stubby." 




ROBERT .SOUTHWELL WHITE (1841-1905) 
Superintendent of Troup Factory for many yean. 



Robert Southwell White was born November 1, 1341 and died January 11, 1905. During the Civil 
War, "Bob" White and a friend, Joe McGee, left Troup Factory and went to Macon, Georgia. They in- 
tended to enlist in the Confederate Army, Bob White was then an overseer in the Troup Factory. When 
the authorities learned from where the young men came and of their profession, they were returned 
to Troup Factory to help keep it going during the war. Bob White later served in Company K, 37th 
Georgia Militia, C.S.A. 



[387] 










Three of the sons of Thomas Leslie, Robert, William P, and Thomas Leslie, Jr., served in the Con- 
federate Army. Thomas, Jr., was wounded and furloughed home to recuperate, where he died in 1864. 

Bob White's father was Thomas White, an Englishman, who came to North Alabama, where he 
married Epsie Pittman. They moved to Troup County and their son, Bob, fell in love with Martha 
Lewis Owen, born in Greenville, Meriwether County, on October 2 t 1841, The sweethearts married 
in May, 1&65 and began housekeeping at Troup Factory. Mrs, White died at the age of 94 years on 
December 30, 1935. 

Mrs. Emory Remembers 

Mrs. Catherine White Emory grew up at Troup Factory. She loved the old, four story factory 
building, a frame structure with hand hewn timbers put together with pegs, using the mortise and 
tenon system. She has a remarkable memory of the operations. 

Cotton was kept in two or three small rock warehouses, for safety from fire. The opening and 
picker room was in a separate building at the side of the factory. From the nearest warehouse there 
was a low trestle on which was laid a narrow gauge steel track. A truck on wheels carried the cot- 
ton bales along the track to the opening and picker room. 

After the bales were opened and run through the picker machines, the fibre was moved to the 
end of the picker room. Here there was a "dumb waiter" type elevator built through the roof of the 
picker room and up the side of the factory. The elevator was used to lift the processed cotton to the 
carding room on the third floor. It also served the second floor. 

Looms for making denims, kerseys, sheetings, shirtings, drills and Osnaburgs were bolted to the 
second floor. Here the women and girls wove the Troup Factory products and the men loom fixers 
kept them in repair. There were a few men weavers. 

Troup Factory yarns were made on the fourth floor, the spinning room. Yarns were produced 
for consumption into cloth on the second floor weaving room and for sale, plain and dyed. 

The first floor of the factory building was a shipping and branding room. Here the rolls and 
bales of cloth were branded with the Troup Factory name using an indigo dye. After packaging for 
protection in coarse woven goods made at the factory, or bagging, the rolls and bales were stencilled 
with black India ink for shipment. 

Factory teams hauled the goods from the shipping room to LaGrange and Chipley, for shipment 
by railroad to customers in many states. Goods were sometimes stored in LaGrange and Chipley ware- 
houses, 

Ben Ashford 

Troup Factory rolls and bales of goods were heavy. There were six mules kept in the stables near 
the Leslie house. For many years, Ben Ashford, known to everybody at Troup Factory and vicinity as 
"Ash," lived in a little house close to the stables and cared for the mules and wagons. He was also 
the driver. 

"Ash" was an unusual Negro with extremely long arms, whose "fists hung down to his knees." His 
feet were of large size and long. It was said of him that he couldn't sit sideways in a wagon body 
on account of his feet! He was affable and did a good job for years and everybody loved him. 

The Dye House 

Near the factory was a building called the Dye House, One of the men who operated this facility 
was a Mr. Voight He was a professional dyer and later moved to Columbus, Georgia. There were others 
holding this important position through the many years dyeing of yarns was done at Troup Factory. 
A boiler and engine room were at the side of the dye house. 

Troup Factory Befl 

A cupola topped the roof of Troup Factory. A large bell hung there. The factory night watch- 
man rang the bell for five minutes every morning at four o'clock. He was never able to catch Mr. 
White in bed! The bell was also rung in times of emergency as an alarm. 

The bell signal was for the operatives and their families to arise, cook breakfast, and get ready 
to come to work by six o'clock. The factory day was from six to six, with about an hour off for lunch. 
Most people walked the short distance home for their lunch, although some "toted 7 ' their lunch. In the 
summer, they would sit under the shade trees or along the bank of the creek and eat. When the weather 
was cold or rainy, they ate inside the mill. An outhouse for employees was maintained in a "toilet 
tower" over the creek at one end of the mill. 

[388] 



Cotton, Corn and Wheat 

During the fall, farmers brought their newly ginned cotton to the mill for sale, Mr. Leslie usually 
sampled and graded the cotton bought. Later, Mr, White sampled the bales. He or someone desig- 
nated by him would cany the samples to the bank in LaGrange. There money was obtained to pay 
the farmers. Sometimes the seller accompanied his samples to town to receive his payment at the 
bank. 

Farmers also brought corn and wheat to be ground. A separate building of two stories contained 
the grist mill. It was driven by water power from the creek. Corn was ground on "corn rocks" in 
position on the first floor. Wheat was ground between "wheat rocks" on the second floor. 

"Water Ground Meal" and ''Troup County Flour" were well known products of the Troup Fac- 
tory enterprises. 

The Houses 

Six of the houses of the factory operatives were lined up along a road or street, about level with 
the top of the mill, but below the Leslie house, The mill was situated on the creek at the foot of a 
steep hill. Other houses were on the hillside across the Chipley road, and all were on the east side 
of Flat Shoals Creek. 

Catherine McGee White was about ten years old when the owners of Troup Factory since its be- 
ginning, Robertson, Leslie & Company, failed in 1881. Mr. Leslie left his beloved factory "an invalid/' 
in poor health, much to the sorrow of the people. 

When John Lemuel Robertson, son of James Madison Creed Robertson, became president of the new 
corporation, Troup Factory, he moved with his family to the place and lived on the same side of the 
road as the Leslie house, but farther up the hill. 

In the Leslie house there were originally four large rooms, about 20 by 20 feet square, with 
high ceiling. There were short front and back porches, A separate building nearby contained kitchen 
and dining quarters, known as the "cook house." Close by was a well, serving kitchen and house. 

The Leslie house was built by John Owen, a carpenter of Troup Factory, and a brother of Mrs, 
White. Four additional rooms had been added by the time the Whites lived in the house. 

First Kerosene Oil Lamps 

Mr. White bought the first kerosene oil lamps for Troup Factory about 1880. Some were bracket 
mounted on column supports in the mill. Up until that time, when more than daylight was needed, 
candles were burned. Mill operations were one shift only, in daylight. 

Mr. Leslie gave Bob White one of the glass lamps and told him, "Bob, you may have this lamp. 
I'll be dadburned if one of these will go in my house. Candles are good enough for me." 

Commissary and Justice Court 

During Catherine McGee White's girlhood, Leslie D all is and Anderson Leslie, Thomas Leslie's 
son, "ran" the Troup Factory Store and commissary. It was often a gathering place for the communi- 
ty where people shopped and talked. Many sat around the front of the store and under the very large 
white oak tree near the right end of the rock store building. 

Under the tree, Justice of the Peace court was held by John Thompson. Judge Thompson, known to 
all as "Squire Thompson," usually drove up for court with an ox hitched to his buggy, in which was 
loaded his legal tomes, records and paraphernalia of office. Troup Factory was in the Rough Edge 
District of Troup County and the white oak tree was also the polling place for the voters. 

John Thompson lived on the Chipley Road near Troup Factory, He was born September 14, 1829 
and died July 5, 1892, He and his wife, Mrs. Martha A, Thompson, born June 23, 1343 and died 
October 12, 1915 are buried in the Thompson Family Cemetery about one and a half miles from Troup 
Factory on US 27, south, in a beautifully kept family burying ground. 

In Troup Factory Village 

Near the store and commissary, where most of the Troup Factory people bought their dry goods, 
household equipment and provisions, was the woodworking shop of Tom Perry. He is remembered as 
being a large, industrious man who always wore brogan shoes. He did cabinet work and also made furni- 
ture and coffins. 

The Troup Factory Masonic Hall was upstairs over Mr. Perry's shop, and regular meetings were 
held there. The name of the fraternal organization was Troup Factory Lodge No. 115 F,A.M. 

[389] 



Thomas A. Perry and his sons, James Oliver and John T. Perry, were industrious men. They op- 
erated a lanyard on Perry Creek, on the west side of Flat Shoals Creek. They had a water power- 
ed mill and cotton gin. When the flood of 1902 washed away the covered bridge at Flat Shoals Creek, 
it destroyed the Perry dam. It was rebuilt in 1902 and a flood in 1903 badly damaged it. 

The Perry millrace was long and rather deep. One night a fellow who had been to the Troup 
Factory "grog shop" and had too much to drink climbed up on it to rest in a breeze. He tumbled into 
the sobering water. Sides were too high for him to clamber out He stayed there "hollering all night" 
in vain before someone rescued him in the morning! 

Troup Factory Church, used by all denominations, was on the right side of the Chipley road, near 
the top of the hill on the east side of Flat Shoals Creek. It was just beyond the old house of the Brooks 
family. 

The church building was a large room about 20 by 40 feet, where church services were held and 
school taught for the children of the factory operatives. Prayer meetings, political speakings, funer- 
als, church and school socials, weddings, community affairs and ''protracted meetings" of the various 
faiths were held there. Many people of Troup Factory were members of Pleasant Grove Methodist 
Church on the LaGrange road. 

While Dr. William Patrick Gaffney was in the Troup Factory community, Mrs. Gaffney taught 
in the school. When Catherine McGee White was seventeen, she taught some in the school. 

The Troup Factory Church was part of the West Point Circuit, and was generally served by the 
minister of the Pleasant Grove Methodist Church. The minister of the County Line Baptist Church 
probably served the Baptists of the community. 

Catherine McGee White joined the Pleasant Grove Methodist Church when she was sixteen. She 
is, in 1971, a member of the Long Cane Methodist Church and the oldest member in the circuit. 

Dr. John H. Hardy was a beloved physician of Troup Factory. He lived on the west side of 
Flat Shoals Creek, on the heights at the old Bob Traylor homeplace. The interesting old home was built 
by Robert B. Traylor, Sr. (1816-1893). The place is still in the family and is the home of Mrs. Louise 
Hardy Thompson. 

At Troup Factory, during the childhood of Catherine McGee White, her mother cooked on the 
fireplace in the old kitchen room of the Leslie house. Later, her father bought her mother a "step 
stove" with four eyes and a small oven. 

The Whites made their own candles in molds to light their house long before the days of oil 
lamps. Mrs. White had an early "lock stitch" sewing machine years before she ever had a "Singer/' 
The children wore stockings knitted by Mrs. White, who also made their clothes. 

Catherine McGee White was married to William A, Emory in 1899, when she was 28 years of 
age. In 1969, she had six children, 19 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren and one great-great grand- 
child! Mr. Emory, born November 12, 1875 died September 23, 1948. 

When she married, Troup Factory had a population of about 400 people. The nearest railroad sta- 
tion was Chipley (now Pine Mountain} in Harris County, seven miles away. 

The author is grateful for an interview with Mrs. Emory on February 21, 1966 and information 
furnished by her. 

The Dams 

Charles W. Corless, Jr., in his research, states that the first dam at Troup Factory was built 
of virgin logs by Maxey Brooks and Ivey Brooks in 1329. About 1846, a rock dam was built below 
the wooden structure. 

The present rock dam is recalled by Mrs. William A. Emory as being built in the summer of 1383. 
She dates this from the fact that her brother, Lewis White, born February 6, 1883, was a baby at 
the time. A Mr. Grant came from Newnan, Georgia to supervise the work and boarded with her 
father and mother while the dam was under construction. 

Troup Factory Moved to LaGrange 

Lemuel Madison Park, of LaGrange, purchased Troup Factory in 1899. A series of floods, culminating 
in the severe flood of 1902, made him decide to move the factory to LaGrange. He began to look for 

a man to do the big job of hauling. 

Mr. Park turned to Charles Warren Corless, a likable "Yankee" from Michigan, In a remarkably 
short time after coming South, the energy, personality and service of Mr. Corless fitted him into Troup 
County life. 



[390] 



Charles Warren Corless was born October 16, 1869 in Cold water, Michigan. He was the son of 
Warren Corless, born July 13, 1832 and wife, Phoebe Bartholomew Corless, born July 17, 1837. They 
were married January 4, 1855. Warren Corless died February 2, 1879, Mrs. Corless died at Coldwater. 
Michigan where she and her husband are buried. 

Birdie Follett, of California Township, Branch County, Michigan was married to Charles Warren 
Corless on June 7, 1893. She was born September 19, 1374. Her father was Reuben Follett, born 
in Dover, Ohio in 1822 and died July 25, 1885, who married Julia E. Kelley, of Dover, Ohio, born 
October 15, 1833 and died July 19, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Follett are buried at California Township. 

In 1895, Charles Warren and Birdie Follett Corless decided to move South for her health. They 
headed for Florida but settled on a farm near LaGrange, on Young's Mill Road. 

Before leaving Michigan, Mr. Corless built a cottage on wheels for the several weeks journey. 
The little house sat upon a large wagon chassis. From the photograph, it would appear to be consid- 
erably more comfortable than a covered wagon! The author has called it an early American mobile 
home. Horses or mules pulled it, snug, dry and many years ahead of the times and spirit of trailer or 
mobile homes in 1971, now replete with every home luxury. 







EARLY AMERICAN MOBILE HOME! - Charles Warren ami Birdie Follett Corless. Sr, came from California Town- 
ship, Branch County Michigan, to Georgia in this "cottage on tcheek*' hi 18$r>- Cories* Collection. 

When the Corless family started their trek, the wagon home was heated with a gasoline stove. 
This had its danger and gasoline was more difficult to obtain as they traveled farther south. In a 
little town they bought a wood and coal burning stove with an oven for bread and biscuits. They pull- 
ed into LaGrange in November, 1895. 

Besides being a farmer, Mr. Corless was an excellent mechanic. He went to work for the pumping 
station supplying LaGrange with water. It was not city owned at the time. Later he became super- 
intendent of the waterworks when they were acquired by LaGrange. 

Mr. Corless was an active fireman and became the fire chief of the LaGrange Fire House. He 
was an acknowledged horse trainer and when the fire house teams were replaced, he journeyed to 
Michigan to buy them. They were shipped by railroad and he stayed on the cattle cars with them to 
see the fine animals safely to LaGrange! 

The team of horses he brought from Michigan drawing the trailer home was much admired 
for their size and strength, This was what caught the eye of Lemuel Madison Park when he was 
thinking of the dismantling and hauling involved in moving Troup Factory to LaGrange. 

Corless' Horse Prod 

Charles Corless hitched teams of horses ahead of teams of mules to pull the wagons, heavily 
loaded with looms, cards, spinning frames and other equipment. The machinery was dismantled as 

[391] 












- 




MACHINE BELONGING TO \V. C.i 
COKLESS, OF LAGRANGE, RUNS 



AMUCK AT COLLEGE 
PARK. 



! 



u ■ 



While whirling through College Park ! 
about 8 o'clock Sunday morning at a 
speed of about SO miles an hour, a"n au- 
tomobile belonging to W, C, Corless, off 
K LaGrange, plunged into the railway watt- 
ng station. Its chauffeur, Frank MeAr- ' 
liiir, of 115 1-2 South Pry or street, was S 
thrown Into the air, sustaining a broken 
left arm, a fractured knee and Injuries 
about the head. Mr. Corles^ who Is a 
partner with Dr, Frank EUdley in the au- 
tomobile business at LaGrange, was 
bruised qmd cut about the knees and lace. 
As for the machine itself, ft will be 
good for nothing except" repair scraps. 

Monday morning McArthur, who vvas 
taken to the Elk m -Gold smith sanitarium,'' 
was resting easily and under fair way to ; 
recover. Mr, ■Corless left for his home '■■ 
Sunday afternoon. He will return Monday! 
evening to appear at the city .court of [ 
College Park in answer to charges of; 
; having yiolated_the speed limit. 

PERILS OF EARLY MOTORIN'C 
clipping. Corlca-t Collection. 



much as possible and some put on skids. Along with the mill buildings, a few of the houses of the 
operatives were taken down and moved to LaGrange. Much of the lumber and framing timbers were 
used in Park Mills. 

The hardest part of the job, Charles Corless knew, was to get the teams and wagons started up the 
steep hills beyond Flat Shoals Creek as they headed westward to LaGrange. At best the hauling could 
be done only m dry weather, when the rutty roads were passable with heavy loads. 

Balky teams would make the movement extremely trying. Anticipating the problem Charles 
Corless solved it in an unique way. Laying out his harness, he carefully wired the cruppers a leather 
loop passing under a horse's tail and buckled to the harness. Next he wired the horse collars. 

From some of the old style wall telephones of that day he removed the magneto and cranking 
mechanism. When he hitched up his teams the drivers connected the telephone equipment to the wired 
harness. A crank or so on the former bell ringing magneto gave the animals a small electric charge or 
shock. Their tails went up, burden forgotten, and wheels flew! 

One day Dr. Frank Morris Ridley (1856-1917), of LaGrange, was ahead of the wagons returning 
from a call Mr. Corless yelled for Dr. Ridley to move over to the side of the road, but the doctor was 
a little slow in maneuvering his buggy toward the roadside ditch. 



A short distance from the dspot the 

I mnchiae ran over a dog. The collision 

caused it to veer in its course and a 

moment later It phinged full speed Into 

the end of the station, 

\Vhen the two occupants of the machine 
wers nicked up, they were all but uncon- 
scious. Dr, C. M. Curtis, of College Park, 
gave them immediate relief. Then they 
were taken to the Elkin-Goldsmith sani- 
tarium. 

Marshal Crecl^of College Park, who 
enjoys a wide reputation for holding am- 
bitious speeders to the limit, was a wit- 
ness of the accident. He made out cases 
against both men and served them with 
copies of charges. The trial Will take 
place Monday night. 
In speaking of the accident, the injured 
[ chauffeur, Frank McArthur, stated that 
the automobile was runuing at a speed 
not greater than 20 miles an hour, when \ 
it was .thrown from its course and hurled 
against the station wall by striking 
against a large pointer dog that ran from 
underneath a wagon directly In front of 
the machine. 

The automobile wag only a light run- 
about, he said, and its lack of weight and 
the inadequate steering gear with which 
It was equippped caused him to lose con- 
trol of it when the doe wag struck. 

"Slap against the side of the station it 
went," he said,, "and the machine In- 
stantly closed up like a Jack knife and 
twisted- itself into all manner of queer 
shapes. Both Mr. Corless and myself 
were hurled out, and I was thrown 
against a telegraph pule. That Is the way 
I sot my arm broken. 

"My principal regret,' ■ he said, as he lay 
encased in bandages and plaster parh "is 
about tlrat dog. Whtn wt struck him he 
gave a yelp, but as Mr. Corless and my- 
se f went hurtling through the air he 
calmly picked himself up and with a wag 
of his tail walked off uithurt," 




Mr. Corless' light runabout runs amuck! From an old newspaper 



[392] 






The crank was turning. A team of horses and mules pulling a heavily loaded flat bed wagon 
ran into the rear of the buggy! 

All was finally completed to Mr, Park's satisfaction. The old folks remembered the spectacle of 
Troup Factory moving lo town until their dying day. Young ones then, now old, still tell about it, 

Charles Warren and Birdie Follett Corless were the parents of seven children: Echo Annetta, 
Julia Follett, Reuben Follett, Charles Warren, Jr., Eva Redding, Birdsell Brown and Lucile Corless. 

Charles Warren Corless, Jr., was born May 9, 1903 in Troup County. As a boy, he was fascinat- 
ed with the stories of his father's achievement in moving Troup Factory. Like him, he wanted to 
be an engineer and construction man. Years later he brought a long time dream to reality when he pur- 
chased the Troup Factory property. 

Corless of Holly Hill 

As Charles Warren Corless, Jr., and his family walked over the Troup Factory property, they 
"fell in love with it," Soon they decided to camp near the picturesque dam on Flat Shoals Creek. After 
one pleasant weekend, they made arrangements to move to the place. They have now lived at Troup 
Factory 35 years 1 

On a hillside, a giant holly tree covered with red berries was an unforgettable sight. Artists paint it 
and others photograph its beauty. Many other holly trees grow about the creek banks and hills, so 
the family named their home Holly Hill. 

The Corless family owns about 550 acres of land at Troup Factory. This includes about 165 acres 
on which are the dam, factory site, cemetery, site of the Thomas Leslie house, and sites of other 
structures now gone. 

The Corlesses moved to Holly Hill in the days before electricity was commonly available in the coun- 
tryside. Kerosene lamps and lanterns provided light for residents outside cities and towns, excepting 
those few who owned a Delco electric system or such equipment. 

By this time, Charles Warren Corless, Jr., had worked on power dams and navigational facili- 
ties in Alabama. He was accustomed to jobs on installations such as Lock 17, on the Warrior River, 
Jordan Dam and Upper Tallassee Dam. He began to look critically at his own dam on Flat Shoals 
Creek. 

In the gaping middle section of the rock dam and at the east end he installed concrete foundations 
to hold generating equipment. In time, the Corless home was lighted with direct current from Flat 
Shoals Creek! As a safety feature, he put a 1000 watt lamp on a pole in the back yard of their home 
to burn night and day. 

The Corless chickens were fed grains and a stalk of corn came up near the electric light pole. The 
blazing light apparently had some effect on the corn. It grew as tall as the pole! The stalk never bore 
corn. As they watched the luxuriant growth, the Corless children began talking about "Jack and the 
Cornstalk!" 

Ardent collectors of Troup Factory lore, the Corless family love Flat Shoals Creek. They know its 
sluggish and swift moods, and like the sight and sound of muddy and clear waters, in season. Big Eddy 
intrigues them. An aftermath of floods, power and romance of the past clings to Holly Hit). 

Their first home at Troup Factory was a small camp house near the eastern end of the rock 
dam. A flood in 1948 slipped up on them with its fast rising waters. They awoke in the night to step 
out of bed into water almost knee deep in the rooms! It was a perilous scramble through the torrent 
to safety on the hillside. 

While the camp house did not wash away, they immediately began building a house farther up 
the hill from the creek. It is comfortable and informal, a delight of the family and the Corless grand- 
children, who go up a little ladder, in the old-fashioned way, to sleep in an attic room. 

On September 26, 1956 work was begun by Mr. Corless on a larger house, somewhat nearer the 
dam, but safely up the hillside. The site has a superb view of the creek, and valley. Planned in a 
modern and functional style, yet showing the originality of the designer, Charles Warren Corless, Jr., 
the unusual house is still in process of building. Much of the work has been done by Mr. Corless. It 
is of reinforced concrete throughout, a veritable "bomb shelter" of a house! 

A well was bored at the site to be under a corner of the house. It became a built in water system. 
There are three stories to the house, with front entrance at ground level near the conservatory wing. 
An entrance to the upper story is made from a terrace on the hillside to the door at the end of a raised 
concrete walkway, boxed on the sides, and reminiscent of a mill sluice. 

[393] 





HOME OF MR. AND MRS. CHARLES 

WARREN COR LESS, JR. 

Pictured under construction at Troup Factory. 



COR LESS HOME AT TROUP FACTORY, 197] 
The home overtook* Flat Shoala Creek and the old 
rock dam of Troup Factory. The approach to the 
front door front a height is reminiscent of a mill- 
race [the canal in which water goes to a mill wheel]. 



The main living floor of the house is now paneled with various hardwoods from the Corless forest 
and is an attractive and complete apartment. A lower floor, many windowed living room the length 
of the house on the creek side, is unfurnished. Other areas in the large and fascinating house which 
is completely air conditioned, and includes a shop for Mr. Corless and much storage are in sta-es 
of finishing, 6 

Mrs. Corless, Jr., before her marriage, was Nancy "Nan" Kate Lee, of Newton County Georgia 
the daughter of Robert Edward and Kate McHugh Lee. She and Mr. Corless, Jr. are "parents of 
four children, Charles Warren, III, Nancy Carolyn and Julia Sutherlin, twins, and Michael Edward 

Corless. 

Charles Warren Corless, Sr., died December 21, 1938 and his wife, Mrs. Birdie Follett Corless 
died July 27, 19o4. They are buried in the family plot at Shadowlawn Cemetery, LaGrange Lucile Cor- 
less Hall (Mrs, J. Channing), born July 16, 1913, died February 15, 1968 and is buried there also. 

Considerable research has been done by Charles Warren Corless, Jr., on the Troup Factory locale 
the Maxey Brooks and other allied families, and land transactions of early Troup County thereabouts' 
Ihe author is grateful for the use of photograhic and other materials from the Corless collection. 

A Little Boy at Troup Factory 

Harold Park, son of Lemuel Madison Park, was born in LaGrange, in 1897. When he was about 
two years old, the family moved to Troup Factory, His father bought the factory in 1899 and thev 
lived there three years. 

Even though he was a small boy, Harold Park remembers how he liked to play on the Ions 
porch of the old Thomas Leslie house, where they lived. He remembers the rainy days preceding 
the disastrous flood of February, 1902. His worried father impressed him and he can remember Mr 
Park departing to the mill, wearing his heavy overcoat and boots. 

The family sometimes spoke of the flood that year, which was greatly damaging to Troup Fac- 
tory operations, and the determining factor for removal of the factory to LaGrange sooner than 
originally planned, as the "greatest since Noah." Silt settled from the receding waters into the looms 
on the second floor of the mill! Much was ruined on the first floor and there was a huge clean- 
ing up job after the waters went back into the banks of Flat Shoals Creek. Neighbors sent "hands" 
to help Mr. Park and the Troup Factory men. 

Lemuel Madison Park was about 55 years old at the time of this calamity and decided he would 
not stay in the cotton mill business. The new corporation, chartered as Park Cotton Mills was a 
venture of the two older Park brothers, Howard Pope Park and Henry B, Park, 

The remaining houses of the factory operatives were torn down by Mr. Park and hauled to Col- 
lege Park, Georgia, where the timbers were used in buildings and houses of that town, first called 
Manchester, and a new suburban development near Atlanta at the time. 

Lemuel Madison Park died on November 19, 1916. He and Mrs. Park and other members of the 
family are buried in Hillview Cemetery, LaGrange. On his grave are a Masonic emblem and the 
words: He stood four-square to every wind that blew," 



[394] 



Rough Edge District 

The Troup Factory area is known as Rough Edge District, 297 G. M. f Troup County. The citizens 
decided to build a shack or shelter for voting purposes and Justice of Peace courts in the long ago. 
When the framing was up it dawned on the builders that the planks for siding were smooth on only 
one side. The other side was rough sawed. 

A discussion got going among the folks as to whether the smooth edge or the rough edge should be 
outside. The "rough edges" won and the district from then on was called Rough Edge. 

Some Old Citizens Remembered 

Leslie Wellington Dallis was bom February 6, 1843. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hulbert W. 
Da His, whose home pi ace was near Troup Factory. He died January 3, 1903. 

Louisa Leslie, daughter of Thomas and Louisa Villiers Anderson Leslie, was married to Leslie 
Wellington Dallis in 1871. At his death he had been living in LaGrange for years, prominent and 
well-to-do. It was said of him that "LaGrange never had a better citizen." 

In 1902 there was a Southern Railway train wrecked near Macon, Georgia. Engineer James T H 
Pittman was killed. He was a nephew of Robert Southwell White, superintendent of Troup Factory for 
many years. He was also a cousin of Mrs. R. E. Hawkins and Mrs. John H. Hardy, wife of Dr. John H. 
Hardy of Troup Factory. 

Engineer Pittman was born in Troup County in I860, It is said that around his front yard was 
a hedge trimmed in topiary fashion to represent an engine and cars! 

George Wright, who lived near Troup Factory, died February 6, 1905. He was born November 
14, 1824. He joined the County Line Baptist Church in 1876. A Confederate soldier and a Mason, he 
was a member of Troup Factory Lodge No. 115, F.A.M., about 40 years with honors, and master in the 
lodge for years. 

Twice married, Mr. Wright had six sons and two daughters by his first marriage and two sons by 
the second marriage. He and other members of the family are buried in the Wright Family Cemetery. 

When Mr. Wright died, the survivors reportedly were W. B. Wright, J- V. Wright (1355-1936), 
Wade Wright (1362-1941), Ab Wright (1875-1953), I. V. Wright and two daughters, Mrs. C. H. Hamby 
and Mrs. Lizzie Wright Norris. 

A President of Troup Factory 

John Lemuel Robertson, son of James Madison Creed Robertson, of Meriwether County, was 
president of Troup Factory for several years after the reorganization of the business in 1881. He was 
born in Meriwether County on June 26, 1849. 

When he died on June 11, 1903 at his home in Greenville, the "sad intelligence' 1 was telephoned to 
friends and to the JjiGrange Reporter in LaGrange. "The brief message brought great sorrow to 
many of the people of our city," it was stated in an old Reporter clipping of his obituary. 

His presidency of the factory was mentioned and the fact that "he was also for a long time superin- 
tendent of the Sunday School of the First Methodist Church of LaGrange." 

He was a good man, brave, fearless and unflinching in doing what he considered the right . . 
Mr, Robertson was well known in LaGrange, having formerly resided here, where his upright, 
Christian walk was an inspiration to many , , . all his life there breathed about him an atmosphere 
of purity and virtue that stamped him a man of pious worth and integrity. 

R. H. Blalock, writing of his friend in the Meriwether Vindicator, said of him that Mr. Robertson 
"felt at home anywhere among God's people. It was a pleasure and a joy to me to hear him pray. 
He used no formal array of words, but in the most sincere and earnest manner possible, talked with 
the Lord. He seemed to get very near the throne and caught inspiration from the very altar of God." 

Mr r Robertson died after only a short illness. In his boyhood, he attended the old male academy 
in Greenville, and afterwards graduated from the University of Georgia. He was admitted to the 
bar and practiced law for a while, but gave up this profession to look after his father's interests at 
Troup Factory. 

So that his daughters might have the advantages of college educations, he moved to LaGrange, 
After the graduation of the older daughters, he moved back to Greenville to be nearer his plantation. 

Following his return from LaGrange, he was a leader in the Greenville Methodist Church and 
Sunday School. In his obituary it was said that the pastors of the church found in him " . . , a sym- 
pathizing friend and zealous co-worker. Not only at church and Sunday School was he always at 

[395] 






his post, but for the weekly prayer meetings he ever came in from his plantation in time to take part 
in the devotional exercises." 

In the absence of the pastor he led the prayer meeting; in the absence of the Sunday School 
superintendent he took charge of the Sabbath School. At revival seasons his burning words and 
fervent prayers showed the deep interest he felt in the salvation of friends and dear ones. 

His daily life gave evidences of his constant walk with God and a thorough consecration 
to the cause of the Master. 

In early life, Mr. Robertson was converted and joined the church at Warm Springs. "From the 
beginnings of his religious life he paid the highest regard to the vows he then assumed. He search- 
ed the Scriptures diligently and was well versed in their deep spiritual meaning. 

"He made a profound study of every Sunday School lesson and his expositions and lectures were 
clear and exhaustive. 

"His great aim was to make the world wiser and better from his having lived in it." 
The Greenville Sunday School paid a memorial tribute and drew up resolutions to the memory 
of their "beloved assistant superintendent and teacher of the Bible class" on June 14, 1903. 

Perry Cotton Gin 

From Smoky Road on the west side of Flat Shoals Creek at Troup Factory, little can be seen 
of Perry Creek to the west of the paved road. It is considerably lower than the road level along 
there, and the swamp is rather thickly grown. 

About a mile from the highway, U. S. 27 South, in a northwesterly direction, Ferry Creek comes 
down from higher ground over rocks and shoals, tumbling and splashing noisily. It has the charm of 
undisturbed natural beauty. 

At a somewhat spectacular spot 
where the creek spills down a high, 
slick rock, James Oliver Perry built 
a water powered cotton gin and grist 
mill in the 1886-90 period. The Perry 
family, for whom the creek was 
named, were early settlers of Troup 
County at Troup Factory. 

The Perry mill was about hali a 
mile from the old pioneer home of 
Thomas A. Perry ( 1825-1 890) and 
wife, Perm el ia J. Earp Perry (1825- 
1882). They were married on January 
18, 1844 and are buried in the Troup 
Factory Cemetery. 

James Oliver Perry, their son, 
and wife, Anna E. Perry, lived in the 
old home and are buried in their own 
Perry Family Cemetery near the 
site of the Perry house. The ceme- 
tery, where children of the couple are buried, also contains the graves of Irb and Clara Oliver Wright, 
parents of the present owner of the Perry mill property, Douglas Wright, and other members of the 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wright have built a home on the site of the home of Mr, Wright's grandparents. 
Huge trees and a rock wall along what was once the south side of the garden patch at the old house 

remain. 

James Oliver Perry served during the Civil War in Company K, 37th Georgia Militia Regiment 
C.S.A. 6 

There were one or two other houses along the road leading to the Perry house site in the old 
days. An old chimney stands among huge trees near the new Wright house. 

Originally the road led to the Perry Ginnery and Grist Mill, crossing the creek in the vicinity, and 
on to Smoky Road. It is grown up in trees and underbrush now and impassable beyond the Perrv 
house site. 

[390] 




RUINS OF PERRY COTTOX CL\ AND CRIST MILL 

James OMoer Perry built this large water powered cotton gin and 

grist mill on Perry Crack m Troup Factory. 





PERKY COTTON' GIN AND CRIST MUX 
TVi/i tt>a?/ /«ctfi tfie creek and (torn. 



ROCK DAM 

Of ike Perrtj Cotton Gin and Grist Mill. 

The Perry Ginnery and. Grist Mill was a boldly 
conceived undertaking. The building was construct- 
ed of rocks picked up from the site and surrounding 
fields of the Perry farms. Its thick walls were built 
close to the waterfall over the slick rock. An area 
was dug out for the two story structure so that 
entrance could be made at the end away from the 
creek at the second floor level and on the south 
side at the lower level. The creek end of the build- 
ing is sheer, with four windows and two other small 
openings lower in the wall. 

Set about east and west with the creek, the 
rock dam was built across the creek from an abut- 



ment of rock and earth at the north side of the building, eastward about 150 feet to a vanishing point 
in the hillside opposite. 

The middle portion of the dam has been washed out many years. Perhaps 100 feet or more of the 
sturdy rock work remains, mostly on the east side of the creek. Rocks are piled as high as about 
twelve to fourteen feet in a massive wall. 

Ruins of the splendidly proportioned Perry Ginnery and Grist Mill building dominate the place 
now. Although some of the sand and lime mortar is crumbling it is still strong and handsome, a 
structure about 60 feet long by 30 feet wide by 24 feet high. Unroofed for probably most of the 
years of this century, large pines and other trees grow inside the walls. In some of the window open- 
ings, weathered heart pine framing clings. Notches in the upper walls once held the ends of sills 
and rafters. 

Fenestration on the south side is five windows, upper floor, and four on the lower level with 
the wide door centered under the upper middle window. This is repeated on the north side except there 
is no doorway. 

At the west end, there are two windows and a wide doorway where loaded wagons drew up 
with cotton from the fields for ginning and corn for grinding into meal. 

In the southeast corner of the lower floor level is a pit. No other sign of the gin and grist mill 
operation remains. The weathering rock walls are a monument to determination and ingenuity of 
another era. 

The Unquenched Thirst 

The grave of little Julia Leslie, aged nine, who died in 1$72, is in the Leslie Family Cemetery. 
She was a victim of typhoid fever. As she lay abed, burning with fever, she kept calling for water. 
When it was brought, fresh from the depths of the well, it never seemed to quench her thirst or 
cool her forehead. 

As the years went by, the well became known as Julia's Well. Tales were told by persons who 
swore they saw little Julia in the nighttime drawing water at the well! 



[397] 



There was an old house nearby in which tenants lived to farm. Finally the story of the unquench- 
ed thirst made it impossible to keep a tenant there and the house was torn down. Julia's Well was 
filled with rock and dirt! 

Does a ghostly child dig at the spot? Some think so. At the thought of feeble hands clawing to 
reach blessed coolness far below the rocks and rubble they shiver. 

Little Julia was the daughter of Anderson and Virginia A. Reid Leslie. 

Postmasters of Troup Factory 

When Robertson, Leslie & Company began operations at the Troup Factory in 1846-47, people moved 
Into the community as houses were built for operatives. Thomas Leslie, partner with James Madison 
Creed Robertson in the venture, became the first postmaster on April 5, 1347, 

Postmaster Leslie served until the post office, Troup Factory, Georgia, was discontinued on June 
5, 1867. 

The second postmaster was William Varnum Gray (1847-1921), nephew of Thomas Leslie. The Troup 
Factory post office was restored on June 19, 1874. 

Other postmasters and the date of their appointment: 
Name 



Abbie T. Dallis 
John Lemuel Robertson 
James Oliver Perry 
Charles T\ Freeman 
Robert Southwell White 
Andrew J, Irvin 
George W. Jenkins 
Samuel W. Hasty 
Charles A. Wagner 
Lemuel Madison Park 
W. N. Jones 
William A. Emory 
Howard Pope Park 



Date 

November 16, 1875 
December SO, 1880 
March 16, 1S81 
February 23, 1S88 
January 22, 13D0 
June 24, 1891 
November 28, 1894 
January 15, 1397 
October 2, 1899 
December 28, 1899 
March 22, 1900 
May 14, 1900 



January 5, 1901 

Troup Factory, Georgia post office was discontinued on April 24, 1902. The effective date of dis- 
continuance was May 15, 1902 and after that Troup Factory mail passed to LaGrange, Georgia post 
office. 

A Troup Factory Physician 

Dr. R r A, Justiss is a physician remembered in the Troup Factory community. He began his practice 
at Troup Factory before 1900. When the factory was sold and removed to LaGrange by Lemuel M. 
Park in 1902, the Troup Factory community began to decline. 

Dr. Justiss began a private practice at his home in LaGrange. He had a handsome buggy with 
carriage lamps. The lamps were lit when he made night calls. John Moss, his Negro driver usually 
accompanied him on his house calls in LaGrange and surrounding community. 

The Priddys 

The Priddy family were among early settlers of the Troup Factory community. Priddy Road was 
named for the family. 

Benjamin Priddy (1783-1843), and his wife, Mrs. "Beedy" Priddy, came from Virginia to North 
Carolina, thence to Georgia. They settled first in Newton or Twiggs County, Georgia, later moving 
to Troup County after lands were opened for settlement. Their daughter, Martha Caroline Priddy, was 
born in Troup County in 1832. She grew up to be married to John Curtis Elliott Floyd (1832-1890). 
of a pioneer Troup County family, Mrs. Floyd died in 1899. 

Land Lots No. 21 and 54 of the Fourth District, Troup County, were bought by Benjamin Priddy 
in 1838 and 1842, respectively. He and his wife are buried not far from his old home site. The graves 
were once marked by wooden pavilions, but these have rotted away. Their graves are believed bv 



[398] 



Priddy family descendants to be about one mile east of the present Priddy Family Cemetery on Friddy 
Road, which is in the grove at the home of J. H. Pruitt. 

It is recalled that in 1930 the Benjamin Priddy house site was covered with vmca minor and 
only a pile of stones remained from the chimney. 

Dr Robert T. Priddy was the son of Benjamin Priddy. He was an early physician of the Troup 
Factory and Pleasant Grove communities. Dr. Priddy was born in North Carolina on March 30, 1814 
and died August 21, 1385. He married Anna Truitt of Troup County. 

Mrs Anna Truitt Priddy lived in LaGrange on Main Street following the death of her husband- 
She was 74 when she died there on Sunday, April 4, 1909. Her survivors were two sons and one 
daughter, O. T. and R. B. Priddy, of LaGrange, and Mrs. John T. Roberts, of West Point, and a sister, 
Mrs. Mattie Griggs, of Fayetteville, Georgia. 

After her funeral in LaGrange, at which the Rev, Dr. Walker Lewis officiated, she was interred 
beside her husband in the family cemetery. 

Others buried near Dr. and Mrs. Priddy are Mrs. Sarah S. Beehan, born September 10, 1300 and 
died May 3, 1879, and Claud R. Roberts, son of John T. and Dora Roberts, born May 18, 1876 and died 
June 15, 1878, There are also some unmarked graves. 

According to Floyd family descendants, other children of Benjamin Priddy were: 

2. 



L Jackson Priddy 

born in North Carolina 
died young 



Jane Priddy 
born in Newton or 
Twiggs County, Georgia 
married to Anderson Smith, 
a chair maker 

Elizabeth Priddy 5. Lorena Priddy 
born in Newton or Twiggs born in Newton or Twiggs 

County, Georgia County, Georgia 

married to Fayette Culver never married 



3, Teriliis Priddy 

born in Newton or Twiggs 
County, Georgia 
married to James Smith 



A New Troup Factory Letterhead 



j. u HoeeflTsoM. ?**!■*«»'- 



i=hErE^ 



*-2>+£S OFFICE OF *&+sZ~* 

-^TROUP FACTORY,** . 

-^2, MANUFACTURERS OF <V^- 

SHEETINGS, SHIRTINGS, DRILLS, Etc. 



$*j& 



>l€l4Zt£€ 



Ofj *J Jto&aij Me> £UUv 




zA ***£ 



^do f&aM <^SjZ 



^£ca^iu^f 




Mi, 



&W/ fa 



hi£</£*t<GO , &> 



' <t$4tdj> &</, 





TROUP FACTORY LETTERHEAD, 18S6 - The Troup Factory, formerly owned and 
operated btj Robertson, Leslie 6~ Co., was reorganized an Troup Factory, a corporation, 
in 1881 Jotiti Lemuel Robertson was president of Troup Factory m 1886. He vox 
of James Madison Creed Robertson, president of Robertson, Leslie & Co. Fqt 



he son 



the text of John Lemuel Robertsons letter, written on his 37th birthday, see pane J44. 



[399]